Hibernate/Sleep Issues Vista Ultimate 64bit


G

Guest

I am having problems getting my machine to sleep. After placing my computer
in sleep mode, the computer powers off as if it is sleeping, but it
immediately resumes back to the login screen. Also, I can not find any
option for Hibernation. I have tried everything I can in Power Options and
the option for Hibernation is not even there.

My ACPI in my BIOS is set to S3.

System Info:
Abit AW8D Mobo
Intel(R) Pentium(R) D CPU 3.40GHz, 1700 MHz, 2 Core(s), 2 Logical Processor(s)
BIOS Version/Date Phoenix Technologies, LTD 6.00 PG, 6/7/2006
Vista Ultimate 64 Bit
4GB OCZ Gold Ram
Radeon X1600 Series
 
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A

Andre Da Costa[ActiveWin]

Have set your Power Plan to Balanced? It also depends on how long after you
set you computer to sleep, for instance, the Display might be set to turn
off in 5 minutes when idle, and the Computer is set to go to sleep after 15
mins. Its likely that you could be waking the computer before it is even
near the specified time at which it should be sleeping.
 
G

Guest

My monitor is set to go off in 45 min and the system to sleep in an hour.
Even when I select Sleep from the shutdown menu does this occure. And where
is my hibernate option?
 
A

Andre Da Costa[ActiveWin]

1. Click Start, All Programs, and then right click on "Command Prompt".
2. From the context menu click on "Run as administrator".
3. If User Account Control prompts you to allow the action, click on
Continue.
4. In the command prompt window, type "powercfg -h off" (or "on" without
the
quotes) followed by Enter button.
4. Close the Command Prompt
 
J

Jim Michaels

Noochie said:
I issued the command with off. Was that what you wanted?



in XP, hibernation can be found by pressing the shift key. shift-H.
this is in the XP turn-off-box. normally you see standby, turn-off,
restart.

--

------------------------------------
Jim Michaels
for email, edit the address

"Because we do not understand the brain very well we are constantly
tempted to use the latest technology as a model for trying to understand
it. In my childhood we were always assured that the brain was a
telephone switchboard. ('What else could it be?') I was amused to see
that Sherrington, the great British neuroscientist, thought that the
brain worked like a telegraph system. Freud often compared the brain to
hydraulic and electro-magnetic systems. Leibniz compared it to a mill,
and I am told some of the ancient Greeks thought the brain functions
like a catapult. At present, obviously, the metaphor is the digital
computer." - John R Searls.
 
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J

Jim Michaels

Noochie said:
I issued the command with off. Was that what you wanted?


my XP system does not sleep anymore either, ever since I installed >1GB
RAM. this is a known microsoft bug. pulling the RAM out didn't fix it
either...

Hibernation mode is much better for long term turn-offs - the system
stays off (at least mine does) but the system state is saved for next
startup. so it starts up quick. give it time for the disk chattering
to settle though. it still must reactivate your network card(s), etc.


--

------------------------------------
Jim Michaels
for email, edit the address

"Because we do not understand the brain very well we are constantly
tempted to use the latest technology as a model for trying to understand
it. In my childhood we were always assured that the brain was a
telephone switchboard. ('What else could it be?') I was amused to see
that Sherrington, the great British neuroscientist, thought that the
brain worked like a telegraph system. Freud often compared the brain to
hydraulic and electro-magnetic systems. Leibniz compared it to a mill,
and I am told some of the ancient Greeks thought the brain functions
like a catapult. At present, obviously, the metaphor is the digital
computer." - John R Searls.
 
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M

McG.

"Because we do not understand the brain very well we are constantly
tempted to use the latest technology as a model for trying to understand
it. In my childhood we were always assured that the brain was a telephone
switchboard. ('What else could it be?') I was amused to see that
Sherrington, the great British neuroscientist, thought that the brain
worked like a telegraph system. Freud often compared the brain to
hydraulic and electro-magnetic systems. Leibniz compared it to a mill, and
I am told some of the ancient Greeks thought the brain functions like a
catapult. At present, obviously, the metaphor is the digital
puter." - John R Searls.

We simply play with the best toys in the store on any given day.
 

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