Frustrated: Promise Controller won't work on motherboard


S

Sam

I got myself a new 80 pin cable. I went to remove the old cable and I
seen that the pin on the motherboard IDE slot had bent. I tried to bend
it back but in the process I broke the pin so now that IDE slot is dead.

I took my [working] Promise PCI IDE Ultra UDMA 100 controller from
another spare computer. The controller was detected without problem. I
confirmed that PCI IDE bus was enabled in the bios. However, it didnt
matter which IDE slot I installed the cable on the PCI card, my system
would attempt to boot and then I get the blue screen of death in XP
telling me to remove any new hard drives and what not.

The error message was STOP 0x0000007b
(0xf7a005528,0xc000034,0xc00000000). I changed 80 pin cables and I
still got the same error. I then used a regular 40 pin cable and
installed it on my working IDE 2 UDMA 33 slot on my MB and the hard
drive booted to XP without problem. Clearly, I don't want to run my
hard drives at 33 when they can run at 100 or 133.

I have an ECS PVMM2 MB. P4 Celeron 1.8ghz.

Is there a solution or workaround here?

Thanks

Sam
 
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D

Dave

Sam said:
I got myself a new 80 pin cable. I went to remove the old cable and I
seen that the pin on the motherboard IDE slot had bent. I tried to bend
it back but in the process I broke the pin so now that IDE slot is dead.

I took my [working] Promise PCI IDE Ultra UDMA 100 controller from
another spare computer. The controller was detected without problem. I
confirmed that PCI IDE bus was enabled in the bios.

Just guessing here, as I've never used a add-on IDE controller. However,
you would probably want the PCI IDE bus DISABLED in the BIOS, as to enable
it would likely cause a resource conflict. The PCI IDE bus in the bios
refers to the motherboard's PCI to IDE controller bridge. In otherwords,
the motherboard's OWN IDE controller is enabled. So you've got two IDE
controllers enabled. There might be a way to make that work, but it would
be better to disable the one you do not want to use. It's best to disable
everything that you do not want to use. -Dave
 
R

Rod Speed

Dave said:
I got myself a new 80 pin cable. I went to remove the old cable and
I seen that the pin on the motherboard IDE slot had bent. I tried
to bend it back but in the process I broke the pin so now that IDE
slot is dead.
I took my [working] Promise PCI IDE Ultra UDMA 100 controller from
another spare computer. The controller was detected without
problem. I confirmed that PCI IDE bus was enabled in the bios.
Just guessing here, as I've never used a add-on IDE controller. However, you would probably want
the PCI IDE bus DISABLED in the BIOS, as to enable it would likely cause a resource conflict.

No it doesnt, they work fine in addition to the onboard controller
when you want more drives than the onboard controller can support.

The problem is just that you need to do a repair install with
XP when you change the controller the boot drive is on.
The PCI IDE bus in the bios refers to the motherboard's PCI to IDE controller bridge. In
otherwords, the motherboard's OWN IDE
controller is enabled. So you've got two IDE controllers enabled.

Perfectly acceptible.
There might be a way to make that work, but it would be better to disable the one you do not want
to use. It's best to disable everything that you do not want to use.

Nope, and he uses the secondary motherboard controller anyway.
 
R

RussellS

Rod Speed said:
Dave said:
I got myself a new 80 pin cable. I went to remove the old cable and
I seen that the pin on the motherboard IDE slot had bent. I tried
to bend it back but in the process I broke the pin so now that IDE
slot is dead.
I took my [working] Promise PCI IDE Ultra UDMA 100 controller from
another spare computer. The controller was detected without
problem. I confirmed that PCI IDE bus was enabled in the bios.
Just guessing here, as I've never used a add-on IDE controller. However,
you would probably want the PCI IDE bus DISABLED in the BIOS, as to
enable it would likely cause a resource conflict.

No it doesnt, they work fine in addition to the onboard controller
when you want more drives than the onboard controller can support.

The problem is just that you need to do a repair install with
XP when you change the controller the boot drive is on.
The PCI IDE bus in the bios refers to the motherboard's PCI to IDE
controller bridge. In otherwords, the motherboard's OWN IDE
controller is enabled. So you've got two IDE controllers enabled.

Perfectly acceptible.
There might be a way to make that work, but it would be better to disable
the one you do not want to use. It's best to disable everything that you
do not want to use.

Nope, and he uses the secondary motherboard controller anyway.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
As Rod says, you'll be fine with all IDE ports enabled, but you do have to
do a repair installation of the OS since the OS hard drive partition is now
being controlled by the Promise controller card. You'll need an F6 floppy
with controller drivers to use at the beginning of the OS installation
(repair installation), or else the drive won't be detected by the
installation routine. Get the latest drivers for your card from Promise at
http://www.promise.com/support/download/download_eng.asp.

Good luck
-Russell
http://tastycomputers.com
 
S

Sam

Rod,
I tried a different experiment this evening. I installed the Promise
controller on my "bad" ECS motherboard. I connected my second hard
drive to it. I booted XP from my newly installed XP partition using
IDE2 (first drive). I got the boot prompt to select which OS to use.
Then the screen went black. I rebooted after a bit since nothing
happened
Interestingly, when the Promise controller is connected to any hard
drive on the ECS board, it doesn't work.

I removed the Promise controller and XP booted fine with that drive.
 
G

Geoff

If you want to ask him personally then send an e-mail. Stop encouraging him
to post here.

We all know rod is the smartest, most wonderful person in the world. Either
post a general question, send him e-mail, or you and him go annoy some other
newsgroup.

However, I am sure rod posted this, pretty miserable life you have rod.

-g
 
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J

JAD

Sam said:
Rod,
I tried a different experiment this evening. I installed the Promise
controller on my "bad" ECS motherboard. I connected my second hard
drive to it. I booted XP from my newly installed XP partition using
IDE2 (first drive). I got the boot prompt to select which OS to use.
Then the screen went black. I rebooted after a bit since nothing
happened
Interestingly, when the Promise controller is connected to any hard
drive on the ECS board, it doesn't work.

I removed the Promise controller and XP booted fine with that drive.

A while back I saw a bios settings that talked about recognizing a 'bios
controlled' add on card, or something along those lines. When installing
this card your at least resetting the ESCD or resetting the cmos? I don't
really consider the promise a 'major' upgrade but anything thats added to an
ECS board I would reset.
 
R

Rod Speed

Sam said:
I tried a different experiment this evening. I installed the Promise
controller on my "bad" ECS motherboard. I connected my second
hard drive to it. I booted XP from my newly installed XP partition
using IDE2 (first drive). I got the boot prompt to select which OS
to use. Then the screen went black.

That may just be because the boot.ini doesnt have the correct
data in it for the various boot alternatives in that particular config.
 
J

JAD

JAD said:
A while back I saw a bios settings that talked about recognizing a 'bios
controlled' add on card, or something along those lines. When installing
this card your at least resetting the ESCD or resetting the cmos? I don't
really consider the promise a 'major' upgrade but anything thats added to
an
ECS board I would reset.

ok ok YOU'RE damn i do that allot stupid spellchecker can't figure out
what I meant...worthless ; )
 
G

Geoff

Ok, so now post the reply that says, 'oh, you're right rod, you're so
wonderful . . . yada . . . yada . . . yada'.

How pathetic you are rodster . . .

-g
 
S

Sam

:
: > I tried a different experiment this evening. I installed the
Promise
: > controller on my "bad" ECS motherboard. I connected my second
: > hard drive to it. I booted XP from my newly installed XP
partition
: > using IDE2 (first drive). I got the boot prompt to select which
OS
: > to use. Then the screen went black.
:
: That may just be because the boot.ini doesnt have the correct
: data in it for the various boot alternatives in that particular
config.

But I am not booting from the drive on the controller, but from
another drive via the IDE2. The second drive connected to the Promise
Controller shouldnt need a boot.ini script when it's not a boot drive,
no?
 
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S

Sam

I dont know his email addy....

: If you want to ask him personally then send an e-mail. Stop
encouraging him
: to post here.
:
: We all know rod is the smartest, most wonderful person in the world.
Either
: post a general question, send him e-mail, or you and him go annoy
some other
: newsgroup.
:
: However, I am sure rod posted this, pretty miserable life you have
rod.
:
: -g
:
:
 
R

Rod Speed

But I am not booting from the drive on the controller, but from
another drive via the IDE2. The second drive connected to the Promise
Controller shouldnt need a boot.ini script when it's not a boot drive, no?

Correct if its just a data drive.

If its just a data drive, the problem may be that the system
is getting seriously confused by the bios on the promise card.
See what happens when you disable the bios on the promise card.
 
G

Geoff

I dont know his email addy....

Oh really? It is on every message he posts, but if you are rod, hi rod, go
annoy another group . . .

-g
 
J

John Doe

Geoff said:
Oh really? It is on every message he posts, but if you are rod,
hi rod,

He appears to be changing his name, but apparently that's not Rod
Speed.
 
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M

Mark

: > But I am not booting from the drive on the controller, but from
: > another drive via the IDE2. The second drive connected to the
Promise
: > Controller shouldnt need a boot.ini script when it's not a boot
drive, no?
:
: Correct if its just a data drive.
:
: If its just a data drive, the problem may be that the system
: is getting seriously confused by the bios on the promise card.
: See what happens when you disable the bios on the promise card.

Yes, it's just the data drive.
Hmm. I have never disabled the bios on the card before, I didnt know
that is possible. Any idea how?
 
S

spodosaurus

Sam said:
I got myself a new 80 pin cable. I went to remove the old cable and I
seen that the pin on the motherboard IDE slot had bent. I tried to bend
it back but in the process I broke the pin so now that IDE slot is dead.

I took my [working] Promise PCI IDE Ultra UDMA 100 controller from
another spare computer. The controller was detected without problem. I
confirmed that PCI IDE bus was enabled in the bios. However, it didnt
matter which IDE slot I installed the cable on the PCI card, my system
would attempt to boot and then I get the blue screen of death in XP
telling me to remove any new hard drives and what not.

The error message was STOP 0x0000007b
(0xf7a005528,0xc000034,0xc00000000). I changed 80 pin cables and I
still got the same error. I then used a regular 40 pin cable and
installed it on my working IDE 2 UDMA 33 slot on my MB and the hard
drive booted to XP without problem. Clearly, I don't want to run my
hard drives at 33 when they can run at 100 or 133.

I have an ECS PVMM2 MB. P4 Celeron 1.8ghz.

Is there a solution or workaround here?

Thanks

Sam

Did you install XP on IDE0 on the mainboard and then put it on the
promise controller? The OS might have a problem with that as some
controllers start at IDE2 and IDE3 (mainboard being IDE0 and IDE1).

Have you tried the PCI card in a different slot on the motherboard?

Regards,

Ari

--
spammage trappage: remove the underscores to reply
Many people around the world are waiting for a marrow transplant. Please
volunteer to be a marrow donor and literally save someone's life:
http://www.abmdr.org.au/
http://www.marrow.org/
 
S

spodosaurus

spodosaurus said:
Sam said:
I got myself a new 80 pin cable. I went to remove the old cable and I
seen that the pin on the motherboard IDE slot had bent. I tried to bend
it back but in the process I broke the pin so now that IDE slot is dead.

I took my [working] Promise PCI IDE Ultra UDMA 100 controller from
another spare computer. The controller was detected without problem. I
confirmed that PCI IDE bus was enabled in the bios. However, it didnt
matter which IDE slot I installed the cable on the PCI card, my system
would attempt to boot and then I get the blue screen of death in XP
telling me to remove any new hard drives and what not.

The error message was STOP 0x0000007b
(0xf7a005528,0xc000034,0xc00000000). I changed 80 pin cables and I
still got the same error. I then used a regular 40 pin cable and
installed it on my working IDE 2 UDMA 33 slot on my MB and the hard
drive booted to XP without problem. Clearly, I don't want to run my
hard drives at 33 when they can run at 100 or 133.

I have an ECS PVMM2 MB. P4 Celeron 1.8ghz.

Is there a solution or workaround here?

Thanks

Sam

Did you install XP on IDE0 on the mainboard and then put it on the
promise controller? The OS might have a problem with that as some
controllers start at IDE2 and IDE3 (mainboard being IDE0 and IDE1).

Have you tried the PCI card in a different slot on the motherboard?

Regards,

Ari

Also, if this XP was installed on a system using a different motherboard
you're going to have to do a repair install of XP. Different board,
different drivers...

--
spammage trappage: remove the underscores to reply
Many people around the world are waiting for a marrow transplant. Please
volunteer to be a marrow donor and literally save someone's life:
http://www.abmdr.org.au/
http://www.marrow.org/
 
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R

Rod Speed

Yes, it's just the data drive.
Hmm. I have never disabled the bios on the card before,
I didnt know that is possible. Any idea how?

Its a jumper on the Promise card. I've lost track of what card it is
now, not sure you have ever spelt out exactly which Promise it is.
 

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