Fixing a DELL Dimension 3000

  • Thread starter jamesjaddah1755
  • Start date

J

jamesjaddah1755

I picked up a DELL Dimension 3000 someone threw out. It's a 2.66GHz, and had a non-working DVD player, along with an 80G hard drive with a corrupted version of Windows that would only give me a blue screen.

After getting the typically poorly designed DELL case open, I managed to reformat and install a fresh copy of Windows XP using a spare DVD/CD player Ihave, which unfortunately doesn't open when the face of the case is in place. (But thanks to Murphy's Law, all of my pcs for over a decade have been "open" one way or another, because I've learned that screwing and closing everything up nice and neat only invites trouble).

A) This machine will apparently only allow a single drive. (That would be physically in the case and also software wise).
B) Booting time is terrible and it takes 10 minutes to reach the desktop. And opening and closing virtually any program is a sluggish endeavor.
C) I cannot get a decent screen resolution. But I managed it on a differentdrive that I plugged into the machine and installed Windows XP on. (So I assume the problem is not the paltry 512mb ram stick the machine has in one of it's two slots).
D) It will not see my card reader, which plugs into the USB pins on the motherboard. But after re-plugging in the cable from the USB ports on the front of the case my Flash drive works. (It also works in the four "Embedded" USB ports on the back of the case).
E) And there is no audio whatsoever. Not from the front or rear of the case.. And not from the audio card I installed.

I found a page with drivers:
ftp://ftp.dell.com/Pages/Drivers/dimension-3000.html
http://www.dell.com/support/drivers/us/en/19/product/dimension-3000

But I’d appreciate ideas on where to begin.

Thanks.

Darren Harris
Staten Island, New York.
 
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P

Paul

I picked up a DELL Dimension 3000 someone threw out. It's a 2.66GHz, and had a non-working DVD player, along with an 80G hard drive with a corrupted version of Windows that would only give me a blue screen.

After getting the typically poorly designed DELL case open, I managed to reformat and install a fresh copy of Windows XP using a spare DVD/CD player I have, which unfortunately doesn't open when the face of the case is in place. (But thanks to Murphy's Law, all of my pcs for over a decade have been "open" one way or another, because I've learned that screwing and closing everything up nice and neat only invites trouble).

A) This machine will apparently only allow a single drive. (That would be physically in the case and also software wise).
B) Booting time is terrible and it takes 10 minutes to reach the desktop. And opening and closing virtually any program is a sluggish endeavor.
C) I cannot get a decent screen resolution. But I managed it on a different drive that I plugged into the machine and installed Windows XP on. (So I assume the problem is not the paltry 512mb ram stick the machine has in one of it's two slots).
D) It will not see my card reader, which plugs into the USB pins on the motherboard. But after re-plugging in the cable from the USB ports on the front of the case my Flash drive works. (It also works in the four "Embedded" USB ports on the back of the case).
E) And there is no audio whatsoever. Not from the front or rear of the case. And not from the audio card I installed.

I found a page with drivers:
ftp://ftp.dell.com/Pages/Drivers/dimension-3000.html
http://www.dell.com/support/drivers/us/en/19/product/dimension-3000

But I’d appreciate ideas on where to begin.

Thanks.

Darren Harris
Staten Island, New York.

If you install the video driver, you'll get more resolutions.
The motherboard uses 865G, so there should be a video connector
that is "part of the box". You need the 865G video driver, and
after a reboot, you'll get say, up to 1600x1200 or the like.
If the machine had a separate video card, then that may have
been added later, and would have its own driver, not on
the Dell page.

(Use the first of the two listed video drivers.)
http://www.dell.com/support/drivers/us/en/19/product/dimension-3000

Slow boot speed, could be a lot of reallocated sectors on the
hard drive.

Slow general disk operation, could come from PIO mode versus
DMA mode. The OS switches from DMA mode to PIO mode, if
there are too many CRC errors. If the errors were caused
by a bad cable, you could try another IDE cable. Preferably
one with 80 wires and not 40 wires.

The 80 wire cables, the wires look "thinner". While the
40 wire cables work fine for CD drives, I'd rather hook
up a minimal system with CD and HDD using an 80 wire cable
and the two connectors on the end. Of course, setting
the jumpers for master for one device, slave for the
other, or Cable Select setting for both devices.

The 80 wire cable supports Cable Select, and that's
the way assemblers at Dell would put them together.
They love Cable Select, because it means not having
to waste a few seconds with Master/Slave jumpers.

While there may be some way to limit the modes the
BIOS can run the drive in at startup, I doubt a
Dell supports that. Like, force the drive to run
only the slowest PIO mode. (Once the OS boots, it
gets to pick the modes after that.) All my systems
here, they stay at "Auto" in the BIOS, and the BIOS
usually runs the drives at max speed on the cable.
I really haven't had a reason to modify any
setting like that.

While a bad hard drive might be the highest
probability of fault, it can also be a cabling
problem.

*******

For audio, you'll need an audio driver. Install
the driver first, and maybe the audio will
magically appear, and none of the following
will apply.

On page 38 here, make sure the J9C2 connector,
is connected to the front panel audio. If you
don't have it connected, then that could
cause the lime colored Line Out connector
on the back of the computer from working.
The front audio cable provides a continuity
path that you need.

http://downloads.dell.com/Manuals/a...ervice manual_en-us.pdf?c=us&l=en&cs=19&s=dhs

Paul
 
M

Mike Tomlinson

But I’d appreciate ideas on where to begin.

Put it back in the dumpster and go buy a new one from a shop, with a
support package and a copy of PCs for Dummies.
 
M

Michael Black

Put it back in the dumpster and go buy a new one from a shop, with a
support package and a copy of PCs for Dummies.
The Dell 3000 I found on the sidewalk (actually, the garage sale was just
closing up, so I wasn't even sure if they had tossed it or were still
hoping to sell it) last year works fine, I soon had Windows erased and
Linux on it. The problem was the RAM was the wrong kind, too slow for the
computer. SInce I didn't actually need the computer, I just put it in
storage until I actually did find the needed RAM.

It's nothing special, but it's still useful. Indeed, the reason I'm not
suing it is that I already had a computer about the same specs.

Michael
 
J

jamesjaddah1755

If you install the video driver, you'll get more resolutions.

The motherboard uses 865G, so there should be a video connector

that is "part of the box". You need the 865G video driver, and

after a reboot, you'll get say, up to 1600x1200 or the like.

If the machine had a separate video card, then that may have

been added later, and would have its own driver, not on

the Dell page.



(Use the first of the two listed video drivers.)

http://www.dell.com/support/drivers/us/en/19/product/dimension-3000



Slow boot speed, could be a lot of reallocated sectors on the

hard drive.



Slow general disk operation, could come from PIO mode versus

DMA mode. The OS switches from DMA mode to PIO mode, if

there are too many CRC errors. If the errors were caused

by a bad cable, you could try another IDE cable. Preferably

one with 80 wires and not 40 wires.



The 80 wire cables, the wires look "thinner". While the

40 wire cables work fine for CD drives, I'd rather hook

up a minimal system with CD and HDD using an 80 wire cable

and the two connectors on the end. Of course, setting

the jumpers for master for one device, slave for the

other, or Cable Select setting for both devices.



The 80 wire cable supports Cable Select, and that's

the way assemblers at Dell would put them together.

They love Cable Select, because it means not having

to waste a few seconds with Master/Slave jumpers.



While there may be some way to limit the modes the

BIOS can run the drive in at startup, I doubt a

Dell supports that. Like, force the drive to run

only the slowest PIO mode. (Once the OS boots, it

gets to pick the modes after that.) All my systems

here, they stay at "Auto" in the BIOS, and the BIOS

usually runs the drives at max speed on the cable.

I really haven't had a reason to modify any

setting like that.



While a bad hard drive might be the highest

probability of fault, it can also be a cabling

problem.



*******



For audio, you'll need an audio driver. Install

the driver first, and maybe the audio will

magically appear, and none of the following

will apply.



On page 38 here, make sure the J9C2 connector,

is connected to the front panel audio. If you

don't have it connected, then that could

cause the lime colored Line Out connector

on the back of the computer from working.

The front audio cable provides a continuity

path that you need.



http://downloads.dell.com/Manuals/a...ervice manual_en-us.pdf?c=us&l=en&cs=19&s=dhs



Paul

Well, I'm actually having the same basic difficulties with two different drives I plugged into the machine before reformatting and installing Windows XP.

The original 80Gb drive that was in the pc and alsoa 40Gb drive. But not atthe same time of course, beacuse as I said, I can't find a way to get thissystem to see two hard drives at the same time. I tried Master/Slave on a single cable, cable select, and also Master for both drives on the primary IDE and secondary IDE respectively.

80Gb drive:
***********
A) Takes several minutes to get to the desktop.
B) As per your recommendation I installed the 865G video driver which immediately corrected any video resolution problems after booting up.
C) Installed the audio driver, but the audio still doesn't work.


40GB drive:
***********
A) Takes a couple minutes to get to the desktop.
B) I didn't install the 865G video driver because the system notified me that it was an earlier version than what was already in use. ?!?
C) Installed the audio driver, but the audio still doesn't work.


A weird thing is that when I boot using either hard drive I am gien the option of booting into the Professional version or Home version of Windows XP.Only one works of course, but I don't know why there is that option, sinceI've never had that happen on any of the other system I've installed this copy of Windows XP on. (But then again, I don't think I've ever had an identical install on even a single system/hard drive out of all the times 've installed XP).

As for the audio that doesn't work, regardless of which of the two hard drives I boot with. The cable from the front panel is connected to the J9C2 connector, and the cable for CD/DVD player audio is connected to the appropriate motherboard connector. (I took out the audio card I put in).

Another weird problem is that even though the system detects the CD/DVD player, regardless of which of the two drives I'm using, no inserted disk willbe seen, so the media players(GOM or VLC) will not open the disks. If I attempt to do anything more than highlight the CD/DVD player in "My Computer"the system will freeze followed by the crashing of any open window, folderor file. The same happens if I attempt to play file using a media player.

At this point it doesn't seem like installing Windows XP to a third hard drive in this system will fix anything. :-(

Thanks.

Darren Harris
Staten Island, New York.
 
P

Paul

Well, I'm actually having the same basic difficulties with two different drives I plugged into the machine before reformatting and installing Windows XP.

The original 80Gb drive that was in the pc and alsoa 40Gb drive. But not at the same time of course, beacuse as I said, I can't find a way to get this system to see two hard drives at the same time. I tried Master/Slave on a single cable, cable select, and also Master for both drives on the primary IDE and secondary IDE respectively.

80Gb drive:
***********
A) Takes several minutes to get to the desktop.
B) As per your recommendation I installed the 865G video driver which immediately corrected any video resolution problems after booting up.
C) Installed the audio driver, but the audio still doesn't work.


40GB drive:
***********
A) Takes a couple minutes to get to the desktop.
B) I didn't install the 865G video driver because the system notified me that it was an earlier version than what was already in use. ?!?
C) Installed the audio driver, but the audio still doesn't work.


A weird thing is that when I boot using either hard drive I am gien the option of booting into the Professional version or Home version of Windows XP. Only one works of course, but I don't know why there is that option, since I've never had that happen on any of the other system I've installed this copy of Windows XP on. (But then again, I don't think I've ever had an identical install on even a single system/hard drive out of all the times 've installed XP).

As for the audio that doesn't work, regardless of which of the two hard drives I boot with. The cable from the front panel is connected to the J9C2 connector, and the cable for CD/DVD player audio is connected to the appropriate motherboard connector. (I took out the audio card I put in).

Another weird problem is that even though the system detects the CD/DVD player, regardless of which of the two drives I'm using, no inserted disk will be seen, so the media players(GOM or VLC) will not open the disks. If I attempt to do anything more than highlight the CD/DVD player in "My Computer" the system will freeze followed by the crashing of any open window, folder or file. The same happens if I attempt to play file using a media player.

At this point it doesn't seem like installing Windows XP to a third hard drive in this system will fix anything. :-(

Thanks.

Darren Harris
Staten Island, New York.

I looked in the user manual, and I don't see any useful
options in the BIOS.

It sounds like there is some problem with the IDE interface,
as it takes a couple minutes to recognize one drive, and two
drives won't work. That's a head scratcher.

I would check the power rails (with a multimeter). But I
wouldn't really know where to go from there.

To bypass the pesky Southbridge IDE ports, I'd install
my trusty PCI IDE card. Like a Promise Ultra133 TX2.
Then connect the drives to that. Using that, requires drivers.
You need an F6 floppy for a fresh install. If the OS is
already installed, you install the Promise driver while
the system is still using the Southbridge port. Then,
move the drive over to the Promise IDE interface, and it
should be able to boot. I have at least one machine here,
that I run that way all the time (use the Promise card,
rather than the Southbridge). I think I have three of the
cards here. At one time, when you bought a Maxtor retail
hard drive, a Promise IDE card came in the box with it.
If I had more of a head on my shoulders, I should have
bought more of them. The Promise card was more valuable
than the (easy come easy go) Maxtor. I've had several Maxtor
drives die. But those cards continue to work.

Paul
 
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J

jamesjaddah1755

I've been using the PC (with it's long boot time) without any major issue outside of the regular audio issues I get when I try to watch DVD movies.

The problem now is that I can no longer reach the desktop without it re-booting. It goes as far as the "Microsoft Corporation" screen with the green bar that goes across in intervals and then it resets.

Could that be the hard drive. Perhaps Windows XP is corrupted?

When I try Safe Mode I can only get as far as this screen before it reboots: http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Computer/SafeMode1_zps1884ec4f.jpg

Thanks.

Darren Harris
Staten Island, New York.
 
P

Paul

I've been using the PC (with it's long boot time) without any major issue outside of the regular audio issues I get when I try to watch DVD movies.

The problem now is that I can no longer reach the desktop without it re-booting. It goes as far as the "Microsoft Corporation" screen with the green bar that goes across in intervals and then it resets.

Could that be the hard drive. Perhaps Windows XP is corrupted?

When I try Safe Mode I can only get as far as this screen before it reboots: http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Computer/SafeMode1_zps1884ec4f.jpg

Thanks.

Darren Harris
Staten Island, New York.

You can cable up the hard drive to another working computer.

Both Seagate and Western Digital have diagnostics. There is
a "DOS" style diagnostic, that fits on a CD, and is self-booting.
And it can test an internal hard drive for you. For my Seagate
drive, it might have been around a 10MB download for "Seatools for
DOS", which I then put on a CD (using Imgburn).

Using another computer, you can also check the SMART statistics
on the drive. HDTune has a tab for that. Reallocated sector
count is one of the indicators I use.

http://www.hdtune.com/files/hdtune_255.exe

These are examples collected over three different days, on
a disk with a growing reallocated sector count. These are
sectors the drive has replaced with spare working sectors.
When the spare sectors are used up, and error scan of the
disk will start showing CRC errors. You can do the error scan
from HDTune as well.

Current Worst Threshold Data Status
Reallocated Sector Count 100 100 36 0 OK
Reallocated Sector Count 100 100 36 57 OK
Reallocated Sector Count 98 98 36 104 OK

*******

Hardware specs for your machine are here, and it's
pretty stripped down. I thought the Southbridge on an
865 could handle six disks, but it looks like yours
has two IDE cables for a maximum of four drives (two
drives per cable).

https://web.archive.org/web/2004121...support/edocs/systems/dim3000/en/SM/specs.htm

Paul
 
F

Flasherly

Could that be the hard drive. Perhaps Windows XP is corrupted?

I make it a practice to run a binary backup during the OS install,
critically watching each stage of subsequent installs ontop of the OS
for compliance and integrity, whereupon they'll merit another binary
backup.

When finished it's largely a discretionary call to how many binary
images there are and what gets kept and discarded.

Invaluable, though, as you've also noticed. Just last evening I was
having trouble with SpeedFan hanging at the loading, whereupon a
system shutdown with a movie playing evoked an OS event error.

Crossed the line and a little too much to take. Pulled a binary OS
backup image, restored the partition via a DOS partition and problem
solved. Back to home base, just as slick as silk.

I've absolutely no patience for Windows' changes, whims or later
discretionary behavior, either it works as an initial state or it
doesn't and gets promptly blown off.

Of course, I'm not alluding to a hardware event error, in which case
the binary image OS restoration would not solve an initial issue.

Besides, you really have no choice;- It's now or later. And either
way, it really won't matter, because nothing changes: a BACK UP is
the First Rule to operating a computer.
 
J

jamesjaddah1755

Thaks everyone.

I just picked up a working DELL 8300, so I'll test the drive in that.

BTW. Every back-up option I've had over the last 15 years either wouldn't work or failed just before I needed it. (Jaz drives, cloning/imaging software, secondary hard drive, secondary systems, etc.). Sigh...

Darren Harris
Staten Island, New York.
 
P

Paul

Thaks everyone.

I just picked up a working DELL 8300, so I'll test the drive in that.

BTW. Every back-up option I've had over the last 15 years either wouldn't work or failed just before I needed it. (Jaz drives, cloning/imaging software, secondary hard drive, secondary systems, etc.). Sigh...

Darren Harris
Staten Island, New York.

I've had to go back as far as two years in my archives,
to get myself out of a mess. Things not working is... normal.

Paul
 
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F

Flasherly

Every back-up option I've had over the last 15 years either wouldn't
work or failed just before I needed it. (Jaz drives, cloning/imaging
software, secondary hard drive, secondary systems, etc.). Sigh...

--
Tried Ghost?

I got it free, Norton Ghost, as an "incentive" for the purchase of a
slotted AMD-processor MB, Athlon 750Mhz, I think, just before the
everlasting, seemingly, AMD Athlon XP lineup (Bartow 2500Mhz was its
pinnacle).

Well, anyway, that Biostar MB was a godawful nightmare, (wouldn't
touch another Biostar with your 10-ft. bargepole), so couldn't have
been happier to find an excuse to update into a socketed AMD processor
with a "for real" MB (became a diehard, one-model MSI MB fan, at that
point, for quite awhile).

As for Ghost and that software imaging package, I've been using it for
15 years (well, updated to Enterprise but only for the same purpose --
off a multi-boot to get into DOS7 and run it on another primary
partition). Once upon a time. . .Peter Norton was un-fat before the
Wicked Ferries inhabited NeverNever Land of Symantec.

I really haven't much sympathy, either, for running inside of the
Microsoft Scheme of Things when it comes to hardware

(EASEUS Data Recovery will run on its own "OS," as well Partition
Master, as do others of a latter ilk. Easeus are the only exceptions
I Do Not run in DOS for general system builds or the occasional
"big-time" glitch. I've a token NTFS partition in case of a +/=4G
file, although, needless to mention, FAT32 is my main-squeeze and goto
mantra.)

In the same sense, you might vaguely extrapolate, I've been running
the same version of Windows XP/SP1, I installed from 10+plus years
ago.

(I keep 3 Norton binary images, sequentially dated back, as times fly
by a world spinning up, FWIW, on new soft and hardware additions. Why
don't you tell me about Windows7 sometime. . .).
 
J

jamesjaddah1755

I've had to go back as far as two years in my archives,

to get myself out of a mess. Things not working is... normal.



Paul

Yes, but I find it difficult to fathom that anyone can have the bad luck that I've always had with PCs.

Case in point. that DELL 8300 that I picked up to test the drive from the DELL Dimension 3000. I got it via Craigslist from these PC repair guys that I had previously gotten that DELL 2600 server(which I'm getting back to working on after 6 months).

The 8300 booted to the desktop find when I picked it up Friday. But when I got it home I realized that there was no audio. Not when XP boots up and not when I open a media player. In fact, attempting to play a DVD or MP3 using any media player causes the computer to stop communicating with the monitor and the screen goes black. (It also did this once while booting up).

I then have to re-boot, which is difficult, because the power supply and processor fans start to turn and then stop after about a second. Then when I try a second time they continue, except that the monitor will still have a black screen. I have to pull the computer AC plug and plug it back in aftera few seconds and then press the "on" button to get the computer to start sending a monitor signal. Sometimes I have to do this several times to get the monitor working again. (There is no on/off switch for the power supply at the rear of the case).

Attempting to play an MP3 file or a DVD movie with Windows Media Player, Real Player, or KMPlayer will immediaately stop the computer from communicating with the monitor. (And VLC Player causes this to happen just during it'sinstallation, so I can't install it).

http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/...mputer/ComputerProfileSummary_zps8f873f40.jpg

Anyway, the hard drive from the Dimension 3000 works. (At least as a slave in the 8300). So I'll have to through that PC in the trash.

Thanks.

Darren Harris
Staten Island, New York.
 
P

Paul

Yes, but I find it difficult to fathom that anyone can have the bad luck that I've always had with PCs.

Case in point. that DELL 8300 that I picked up to test the drive from the DELL Dimension 3000. I got it via Craigslist from these PC repair guys that I had previously gotten that DELL 2600 server(which I'm getting back to working on after 6 months).

The 8300 booted to the desktop find when I picked it up Friday. But when I got it home I realized that there was no audio. Not when XP boots up and not when I open a media player. In fact, attempting to play a DVD or MP3 using any media player causes the computer to stop communicating with the monitor and the screen goes black. (It also did this once while booting up).

I then have to re-boot, which is difficult, because the power supply and processor fans start to turn and then stop after about a second. Then when I try a second time they continue, except that the monitor will still have a black screen. I have to pull the computer AC plug and plug it back in after a few seconds and then press the "on" button to get the computer to start sending a monitor signal. Sometimes I have to do this several times to get the monitor working again. (There is no on/off switch for the power supply at the rear of the case).

Attempting to play an MP3 file or a DVD movie with Windows Media Player, Real Player, or KMPlayer will immediaately stop the computer from communicating with the monitor. (And VLC Player causes this to happen just during it's installation, so I can't install it).

http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/...mputer/ComputerProfileSummary_zps8f873f40.jpg

Anyway, the hard drive from the Dimension 3000 works. (At least as a slave in the 8300). So I'll have to through that PC in the trash.

Thanks.

Darren Harris
Staten Island, New York.

So you think there is a video problem with the 8300 ?

When I get a computer, I go through the same set of
tests each time, to "prove it is a computer". No
matter how shiny a computer is, you have to test it.

I use memtest86+ to prove the memory has no stuck-at faults.

Prime95 Torture Test, which exercises processor and memory.
And in some cases, if there is a power supply problem,
the screen would go black as soon as you start the Prime95
run.

By using Prime95, it doesn't do any appreciable video, so
that's a way to tell a difference between a CPU or power
problem, and a video card problem.

For video (Direct3D), I might use an old copy of
3DMark. If some driver file isn't installed, sometimes
that will tell me I didn't do part of it right.

You can also use the built-in "dxdiag" to review the
availability of acceleration on the video card.

There are a few things like that you can methodically work
through.

For the audio, I start with Device Manager, and see
if any drivers are missing. Look for the yellow marks.
A Dell probably doesn't have a BIOS setting to disable
the audio, but you could check that setting in the BIOS
as well.

*******

Some of your Dells have a four LED diagnostic display.
And if the box crashes early in POST, the LED display
has some combination of yellow or green colors.
And you can look up those codes to see what has
happened.

*******

You like the Dells, but not all models of Dell are
winners. Some had a high incidence of the "bad capacitor"
problem, and with those models, really *no* instance
of the machine is safe. If the seller can tell you
the motherboard was "re-capped" and all the caps were
replaced, then it would be worth buying.

On a couple years worth of Dells, the power supply
connector does not follow the accepted standard.
If you replace a power supply on those, you have to be
careful to compare the cable harness colors (on the 20 pin
main cable), and see whether the original supply is a
"standard" type, or the Dell screwup type. Dell eventually
stopped doing that. Making your own power supply
standard, really doesn't do you any good at all.
PowerPCandCooling company, used to make pin compatible
replacements, but they were bought by OCZTechnology, and
OCZ went bankrupt and it's hard to say whether there
is a business unit any more making those Dell supplies.
You'd be at the mercy of some random Chinese supplier now,
or have to build your own adapter cable, to convert from
"standard ATX" to "Dell". The later Dells are all standard.

You can find all sorts of web sites, with the
standard power supply wire colors shown. Just a
matter of figuring out where pin 1 is.

http://pinouts.ru/Power/atxpower_pinout.shtml

Paul
 
F

Flasherly

Attempting
to play an MP3 file or a DVD movie with Windows Media Player, Real
Player, or KMPlayer will immediaately stop the computer from
communicating with the monitor. (And VLC Player causes this to happen
just during it's installation, so I can't install it).

--
Get the MB driver support files and reinstall Windows to verify the
audio in fact will take. Had a MB with a bad audio chip (never could
get it to come up) -- they're mostly all the same, probably RealTek
drivers -- and had to put in a PCI soundboard (much better sound,
anyway, and not much getting around when using a microphone and
computer for calling out to telephone/cell units, as my soundboard
does it better than anything generic on a MB I've yet run into).
 
J

jamesjaddah1755

(e-mail address removed) wrote: > On Friday, May 9, 2014 8:08:05 PM UTC-4, Paul wrote: >> (e-mail address removed) wrote: >> >>> Thaks everyone. >>> I just picked up a working DELL 8300, so I'll test the drive in that. >>> BTW. Every back-up option I've had over the last 15 years either wouldn'twork or failed just before I needed it. (Jaz drives, cloning/imaging software, secondary hard drive, secondary systems, etc.). Sigh... >>> Darren Harris >>> Staten Island, New York. >> >> >> I've had to go back as far as twoyears in my archives, >> >> to get myself out of a mess. Things not working is... normal. >> >> >> >> Paul > > Yes, but I find it difficult to fathomthat anyone can have the bad luck that I've always had with PCs. > > Case in point. that DELL 8300 that I picked up to test the drive from the DELL Dimension 3000. I got it via Craigslist from these PC repair guys that I hadpreviously gotten that DELL 2600 server(which I'm getting back to working on after 6 months). > > The 8300 booted to the desktop find when I picked it up Friday. But when I got it home I realized that there was no audio. Notwhen XP boots up and not when I open a media player. In fact, attempting to play a DVD or MP3 using any media player causes the computer to stop communicating with the monitor and the screen goes black. (It also did this once while booting up). > > I then have to re-boot, which is difficult, because the power supply and processor fans start to turn and then stop after about a second. Then when I try a second time they continue, except that the monitor will still have a black screen. I have to pull the computer AC plug and plug it back in after a few seconds and then press the "on" button to get the computer to start sending a monitor signal. Sometimes I have to do this several times to get the monitor working again. (There is no on/off switch for the power supply at the rear of the case). > > Attempting to play an MP3 file or a DVD movie with Windows Media Player, Real Player, or KMPlayer will immediaately stop the computer from communicating with the monitor.(And VLC Player causes this to happen just during it's installation, so I can't install it). > > http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/...mputer/ComputerProfileSummary_zps8f873f40.jpg > > Anyway, the hard drive from the Dimension 3000 works. (At least as a slave in the 8300). So I'll have to through that PC in the trash. > > Thanks. > > Darren Harris > Staten Island, New York. So you think there is a video problem with the 8300 ? When I get a computer, I go through the same set of tests each time, to "prove it is a computer". No matter how shiny a computer is, you have to test it. I use memtest86+ to prove the memory has no stuck-at faults. Prime95 Torture Test, which exercises processor and memory. And in some cases, if there is a power supply problem, the screen would go black as soon as you start the Prime95 run. By using Prime95, it doesn't do any appreciable video,so that's a way to tell a difference between a CPU or power problem, and avideo card problem. For video (Direct3D), I might use an old copy of 3DMark. If some driver file isn't installed, sometimes that will tell me I didn't do part of it right. You can also use the built-in "dxdiag" to review theavailability of acceleration on the video card. There are a few things like that you can methodically work through. For the audio, I start with Device Manager, and see if any drivers are missing. Look for the yellow marks. ADell probably doesn't have a BIOS setting to disable the audio, but you could check that setting in the BIOS as well. ******* Some of your Dells havea four LED diagnostic display. And if the box crashes early in POST, the LED display has some combination of yellow or green colors. And you can lookup those codes to see what has happened. ******* You like the Dells, but not all models of Dell are winners. Some had a high incidence of the "bad capacitor" problem, and with those models, really *no* instance of the machine is safe. If the seller can tell you the motherboard was "re-capped" and all the caps were replaced, then it would be worth buying. On a couple yearsworth of Dells, the power supply connector does not follow the accepted standard. If you replace a power supply on those, you have to be careful to compare the cable harness colors (on the 20 pin main cable), and see whetherthe original supply is a "standard" type, or the Dell screwup type. Dell eventually stopped doing that. Making your own power supply standard, reallydoesn't do you any good at all. PowerPCandCooling company, used to make pin compatible replacements, but they were bought by OCZTechnology, and OCZ went bankrupt and it's hard to say whether there is a business unit any moremaking those Dell supplies. You'd be at the mercy of some random Chinese supplier now, or have to build your own adapter cable, to convert from "standard ATX" to "Dell". The later Dells are all standard. You can find all sorts of web sites, with the standard power supply wire colors shown. Just a matter of figuring out where pin 1 is. http://pinouts.ru/Power/atxpower_pinout.shtml Paul

Nothing under video or audio in Device manager has a yellow question mark.

And attempting any video or audio test in "dxdiag" results in the monitor going black.

I beleive there are four diagnostic lights near the mouse and keyboard inputs at the rear that eventually setting sown after booting to all green or green for "A", "B", & "C", with "D" being yellow.
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Computer/8300Diaglights_zps1ea4ef57.jpg

No, I don't like DELLS. They just happen to be the last three desktops I got. All but one of the rest of about a dozen PCs going back 15 years were other brands. (HP, Compaq, homebuilt, etc).

Anyway, I've changed the power supply, used different ram, swapped around cables to hard drives and DVD drives, and reformatted and installed XP again.. I don't know anything about the PCI audio card or the PCI ideo card whichhad twin monitor connections. But I'm thinking that the problem may not beeither card since attempting to play audio or video will result in the monitor going black. So it's probably something they have in common.

As for drivers. Any idea what I may try downloading from here?
http://www.dell.com/support/drivers/us/en/04/Product/dimension-8300
http://ftp.dell.com/Pages/Drivers/dimension-8300.html
(I can't remember ever installing standalone drivers exept off of a CD so I'll have to look up how this is done).

Thanks a lot.

Darren Harris
Staten Island, New York.
 
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P

Paul

nths). > > The 8300 booted to the desktop find when I picked it up Friday. But when I got it home I realized that there was no audio. Not when XP boots up and not when I open a media player. In fact, attempting to play a DVD or MP3 using any media player causes the computer to stop communicating with the monitor and the screen goes black. (It also did this once while booting up). > > I then have to re-boot, which is difficult, because the power supply and processor fans start to turn and then stop after about a second. Then when I try a second time they continue, except that the monitor will still have a black screen. I have to pull the computer AC plug and plug it back in after a few seconds and then press the "on" button to get the computer to start sending a monitor signal. Sometimes I have to do this several times to get the monitor working again. (There is no on/off switch for the power supply at the rear of the case). > > Attempting to play an MP3 file or a DVD movie wi
th Windows Media Player, Real Player, or KMPlayer will immediaately stop the computer from communicating with the monitor. (And VLC Player causes this to happen just during it's installation, so I can't install it). > > http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/...mputer/ComputerProfileSummary_zps8f873f40.jpg > > Anyway, the hard drive from the Dimension 3000 works. (At least as a slave in the 8300). So I'll have to through that PC in the trash. > > Thanks. > > Darren Harris > Staten Island, New York. So you think there is a video problem with the 8300 ? When I get a computer, I go through the same set of tests each time, to "prove it is a computer". No matter how shiny a computer is, you have to test it. I use memtest86+ to prove the memory has no stuck-at faults. Prime95 Torture Test, which exercises processor and memory. And in some cases, if there is a power supply problem, the screen would go black as soon as you start the Prime95 run. By using Prime95, it d
oesn't do any appreciable video, so that's a way to tell a difference between a CPU or power problem, and a video card problem. For video (Direct3D), I might use an old copy of 3DMark. If some driver file isn't installed, sometimes that will tell me I didn't do part of it right. You can also use the built-in "dxdiag" to review the availability of acceleration on the video card. There are a few things like that you can methodically work through. For the audio, I start with Device Manager, and see if any drivers are missing. Look for the yellow marks. A Dell probably doesn't have a BIOS setting to disable the audio, but you could check that setting in the BIOS as well. ******* Some of your Dells have a four LED diagnostic display. And if the box crashes early in POST, the LED display has some combination of yellow or green colors. And you can look up those codes to see what has happened. ******* You like the Dells, but not all models of Dell are winners. Some had a high inciden
ce of the "bad capacitor" problem, and with those models, really *no* instance of the machine is safe. If the seller can tell you the motherboard was "re-capped" and all the caps were replaced, then it would be worth buying. On a couple years worth of Dells, the power supply connector does not follow the accepted standard. If you replace a power supply on those, you have to be careful to compare the cable harness colors (on the 20 pin main cable), and see whether the original supply is a "standard" type, or the Dell screwup type. Dell eventually stopped doing that. Making your own power supply standard, really doesn't do you any good at all. PowerPCandCooling company, used to make pin compatible replacements, but they were bought by OCZTechnology, and OCZ went bankrupt and it's hard to say whether there is a business unit any more making those Dell supplies. You'd be at the mercy of some random Chinese supplier now, or have to build your own adapter cable, to convert from "st
andard ATX" to "Dell". The later Dells are all standard. You can find all sorts of web sites, with the standard power supply wire colors shown. Just a matter of figuring out where pin 1 is. http://pinouts.ru/Power/atxpower_pinout.shtml Paul
Nothing under video or audio in Device manager has a yellow question mark.

And attempting any video or audio test in "dxdiag" results in the monitor going black.

I beleive there are four diagnostic lights near the mouse and keyboard inputs at the rear that eventually setting sown after booting to all green or green for "A", "B", & "C", with "D" being yellow.
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Computer/8300Diaglights_zps1ea4ef57.jpg

No, I don't like DELLS. They just happen to be the last three desktops I got. All but one of the rest of about a dozen PCs going back 15 years were other brands. (HP, Compaq, homebuilt, etc).

Anyway, I've changed the power supply, used different ram, swapped around cables to hard drives and DVD drives, and reformatted and installed XP again. I don't know anything about the PCI audio card or the PCI ideo card which had twin monitor connections. But I'm thinking that the problem may not be either card since attempting to play audio or video will result in the monitor going black. So it's probably something they have in common.

As for drivers. Any idea what I may try downloading from here?
http://www.dell.com/support/drivers/us/en/04/Product/dimension-8300
http://ftp.dell.com/Pages/Drivers/dimension-8300.html
(I can't remember ever installing standalone drivers exept off of a CD so I'll have to look up how this is done).

Thanks a lot.

Darren Harris
Staten Island, New York.

The diagnostic LED table here here. Four green LEDs
indicates a "normal start". You have one yellow LED
that I could see in your picture. Check the table to
see what code you've got.

(See page 2)

http://downloads.dell.com/Manuals/a...ktops/dimension-8300_service manual_en-us.pdf

The chipset on your system is 875P (I have one of those).
(There are two chips, 875P Northbridge, ICH5 Southbridge.)
The ICH5 chip has a problem with USB ports. The chip
is large, and normally doesn't have a heatsink on top.
The Northbridge has a heatsink (but doesn't fail),
whereas the ICH5 Southbridge has no heatsink. Sometimes,
the USB ports go into latchup from static electricity,
and the bond wires supplying 5V to the Southbridge,
they burn out. On some systems, the computer is dead at
that point. This would be what the chip looks like on
a totally dead system. (Some systems don't die totally,
and just the USB ports no longer accept plugged in
devices - no USB keyboard or mouse would work.)

http://i.onfinite.com/TFG42bkgd.jpg

So that's the biggest concern with 865/875 family,
is the ICH5 or ICH5R Southbridge. I have read postings
from around 20 different people with that problem.
One poster lost a total of five motherboards with
ICH5 chips on them. For some reason, mine is still
intact and works fine. Just luck.

*******

You can check Event Viewer in Windows, to see if
the black screen causes any events to be recorded.

If the OS has a problem, it has two choices. It
can BSOD and present a blue screen with an error number
on the screen. But, by default, on a BSOD, the OS is set
to restart Windows, and the BSOD doesn't stay on the screen.
You can adjust the system settings, so the computer does
not restart on a BSOD. And then you can write down the error.

IF the screen goes black, that could be a video card or
video driver error. The symptoms could be the result
of the output port removing sync signal - some monitors
will report "loss of signal" depending on what signal
has gone missing. Or, they report "out of range", if a
multisync monitor is driven with a sync signal which
is outside the acceptable frequency range.

*******

The Dell download site has three audio drivers. Two are for
SoundBlaster PCI cards. You would look in the PCI slot area,
for a sound card with three or more audio connectors on the
faceplate. The OEM Soundblaster, worth around $40, has four
audio connectors on it. Some flavor of that one, can be
bundled with a Dell. More expensive SB cards might have
a few more connectors (even some with gold plating on them).

If you no longer have a PCI sound card present, no faceplate
with 1/8" jacks in the PCI slot area, then next you look to
the I/O plate area provided by the motherboard itselt. The
sound chip there is SoundMax (Analog Devices) AD1980 AC'97.
Because it is AC'97, you won't be having any problems with
Microsoft UAA driver. But you still need to download the
SoundMax package to get your sound working.

On some motherboards (like mine), you can go into the
BIOS setup screen at startup time, and turn off the
motherboard audio. That would prevent the driver package
from installing.

I have a SoundMax which is only slightly newer than yours.
And these are the things I see. Mine is HDAudio instead of
AC'97, so the driver file names won't be the same. It's just
to illustrate what it would look like with a driver installed.
The Dell Audio section on that web page you showed, has
an AD198x driver suitable for that purpose.

http://i61.tinypic.com/2jcc0gi.gif

The ICH5 problem either causes the USB ports to be unresponsive,
or the computer dies altogether (will no longer boot). I don't
remember anyone having trouble with AC'97 because of one
of those failures. But examine the top of the chip, for
burn marks or discoloration.

Paul
 
F

Flasherly

I've changed the power supply, used different ram, swapped around
cables to hard drives and DVD drives, and reformatted and installed XP
again. I don't know anything about the PCI audio card or the PCI ideo
card which had twin monitor connections. But I'm thinking that the
problem may not be either card since attempting to play audio or video
will result in the monitor going black. So it's probably something
they have in common.
As for drivers. Any idea what I may try downloading from here?
http://www.dell.com/support/drivers/us/en/04/Product/dimension-8300
http://ftp.dell.com/Pages/Drivers/dimension-8300.html
(I can't remember ever installing standalone drivers exept off of a CD so I'll have to look up how this is done).


A generic XP install, say as opposed to and if included, Dell's XP
disc might be interesting.

Don't get fancy but get your video/audio up and running first. Bunch
of ATI drivers...

....cool card btw, ran with them in PCI slots from the ATI 7500 to 98xx
series -- then went native MB-included chipsets, as most/many
popularly now offer. ATI at points garnered the onus of being
notorously difficult to remove embedded driver/kernel additions once
installed, though. Great boards otherwise.

Try and do, though, exactly match the recommended driver to the
specific ID packaging for the system build (and it's exactly
identified videochip).

ADI Onboard Sound Driver Multiple System appears the indicated course
for soundchip driver support.


past that. . .

CHIPSET driver is essential
(Promise SATA controller may/might/possibly as well be required. Not
sure.)

Thing is to first address the problem. ATI should be their own
convoluted install, multiple reboots possibly to get it down pat and
take. Best let them do it if such is the provided course.

Leave off and wait.

The soundchip drivers, then, may also be self-installing. Go ahead
with it.

(The other method is to identify the driver files notably an included
INF whereupon to get into XP's Administrative Tools/Computer
Management/Device Drivers -- find the device and drill down to change
out or point to the location of desired/updated drivers. A side
mention for a bit of an "artform" among technical means and computer
assembly at times.)

Get FooBar and PotPlayer, now, for your media players - MP3/Video
respectively. Don't screw, ever, with Microsoft (the European
Commonwealth sued Microsoft, successfully, a few years back over a
tradition of its "dicking practises" when messing with multimedia).

PP movie player is Chinese, excellent, for minorly complicated, and
FooBar is the go-to for kick ass in any dictionary under MP3. Both
freeware, but of course.

Make a binary image of roughly a 3G primary partition XP install,
(from a DOS7 primary partition under 1G), don't deviate from FAT32
during the partition creation, and use Ghost under DOS7 for the image
mechanics. The XP will reduce to approximately 800M-1G image size (45
seconds to reinitiate a clean XP image from platter to my SSD boot,
and like 20 seconds then to come up.)

Get the rest of Dell's stuff and experiment once you're butt's covered
with a backup strategy, getting back to what you know works and is
right.
 
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F

Flasherly

So that's the biggest concern with 865/875 family,
is the ICH5 or ICH5R Southbridge. I have read postings
from around 20 different people with that problem.
One poster lost a total of five motherboards with
ICH5 chips on them. For some reason, mine is still
intact and works fine. Just luck.

I've also had and recognize that chip. Never really had a problem
with any MB chipset, tho - including a present MB Nvidia chip that
runs --really likes to-- at 130F, while a MB support chip hits 120F
(closer, actually, to temps off a x2-4000 AMD dualcore/Gigabyte MB,
all being "sensor-generating" chips). Knock on wood and praise
relatively newer, new-bought MBs -- it's very hot where I live, not
terribly far from the equator.

(Intel G41 EagleLake ICH7/Gigabyte on this one, an early PentiumD 805
dualcore, which runs comparitively like an iceberg to the AMD. Apart
from dog performance, HDs generate the most in the way of heat from
it.)
 
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