Does XP Pro and XP Home use the same SP3 Upgrade file?


C

casey.o

Thanks to all who replied about my question about whether or not to
reinstall XP. However, no one answered the question about the upgrade
to Sp3. Since I have dialup internet, I cant upgrade online. I got the
SP3 upgrade file from a WIFI site and saved the 300+ meg .exe file to my
laptop. I got it from microsoft.com. But it did not specify if it's
for XP Pro, or XP Home. Is it for BOTH?

One other thing, can I just copy this to a USB flash drive and run it,
or do I need to burn to a CD? I'd prefer the flash drive.

Thanks
 
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G

Good Guy

Thanks to all who replied about my question about whether or not to
reinstall XP. However, no one answered the question about the upgrade
to Sp3. Since I have dialup internet, I cant upgrade online. I got the
SP3 upgrade file from a WIFI site and saved the 300+ meg .exe file to my
laptop. I got it from microsoft.com. But it did not specify if it's
for XP Pro, or XP Home. Is it for BOTH?

One other thing, can I just copy this to a USB flash drive and run it,
or do I need to burn to a CD? I'd prefer the flash drive.

Thanks
If you have the big fat SP3 file then it is for both versions. SP files
are all identical for all systems.

No you don't need to burn it on a CD because it is an executable file.
Just insert your flash drive and double click on the file and wait for
about 30 minutes for it to upgrade the system.

You can slipstream it but this might take longer for you to create a CD
for both: -- Original XP + SP3.
 
P

Paul

Good said:
If you have the big fat SP3 file then it is for both versions. SP files
are all identical for all systems.

No you don't need to burn it on a CD because it is an executable file.
Just insert your flash drive and double click on the file and wait for
about 30 minutes for it to upgrade the system.

You can slipstream it but this might take longer for you to create a CD
for both: -- Original XP + SP3.

There are valid reasons for making a slipstreamed version.
For example, if your original WinXP installer CD is very old,
there might be limitations on initial disk drive size, or
a limitation on a built-in driver. (Can be tricking adding
the OS as a dual boot, fitting it to a partition located
on the high end of the disk, and so on.)

I did slipstreaming for that reason on Win2K, and made myself
a Win2K SP4 CD so I would be ready for anything. It would accept
drives over 137GB, no problem.

My purchased WinXP CD was already at SP3, so I didn't need to
slipstream that one.

*******
The SP3 file should be for both Home and Pro, judging by the
pre-requisite requirements listed on the download page.

WindowsXP-KB936929-SP3-x86-ENU.exe 331,805,736 bytes = 316.4MB

"System Requirements
Supported Operating System

Windows XP Home Edition , Windows XP Professional Edition,
Windows XP Service Pack 1, Windows XP Service Pack 2"

HTH,
Paul
 
P

Paul

Bill said:
I thought somebody already answered that, and said it was the same for both.


If I were you, I'd do neither. I'd copy it to the hard drive of the
computer you want to install it on, and run it *there* on the local hard
drive.

Also, why not simply clone the existing drive (as a backup option), and then
try it out firsthand, since that way you'd have nothing to lose and will
find out for a fact if you're "good to go", rather than rely on some
opinions. And in the event it doesn't work, you can simply put back your
old drive.

Agree on the backup idea.

If you only have the one computer, you need a "Plan B" if
something goes wrong.

I did a transition on a system once, took some hardware apart,
and had just the one computer on hand. And ran into problems.
I had to get out the screwdriver and undo all my work again,
to be able to recover and make forward progress. I learned
a lesson from that, about expecting trouble, and having
an easy means to start over again.

If you have just the one computer, are attempting an OS
re-installation, you should have some means of "going back"
if you run into a problem. In my current situation, with
quite a few spare hard drives sitting in a pile, it's just
easier to start with a blank one, do a test install to that,
then, if things are broken, install the original drive in
the machine and do whatever needs doing on the Internet.
Then try again later with the blank drive, until I
get it working.

And in terms of "worst case" bad luck, I've managed to
break two computers while working on them, requiring a
third computer to do some Google searches for solutions.

In Casey's case, the problem is the dialup connection,
and the limitations that presents for tool choices. For
example, getting a copy of Macrium Reflect Free, is over
100MB of download. And that means a trip to the Wifi site.
And if Casey happened to know something of Linux, and making
a Linux LiveCD for various computer repair issues, that can
be 800MB of download. There are things out there that are
free, but the download is still a nuisance factor.

Without a large cache of "tools" downloaded for the job, the
next best thing might be a separate drive to install the
new OS on. Once the OS is working half decent, then connect
up the other drive and transfer some stuff over.

Paul
 
B

BillW50

Good Guy wrote:
There are valid reasons for making a slipstreamed version.
For example, if your original WinXP installer CD is very old,
there might be limitations on initial disk drive size, or
a limitation on a built-in driver. (Can be tricking adding
the OS as a dual boot, fitting it to a partition located
on the high end of the disk, and so on.)

Great idea if you plan on installing it on other machines. Although if
we are talking about just one machine, backup and recovery does even
better. As not only do you have the latest SP, but also all of the
latest security patches, installed applications, all necessarily
drivers, etc.

The sad thing about backup and recovery method, is it's hard to test to
see if the recovery actually works. What I like even better is cloning
drives for backing up. Thus after cloning, I use the cloned one and put
the original away for safe keeping.
I did slipstreaming for that reason on Win2K, and made myself
a Win2K SP4 CD so I would be ready for anything. It would accept
drives over 137GB, no problem.

I am surprised you didn't include the Unofficial SP5 for Windows 2000
too. That includes all patches that was released after SP4.
 
P

Paul

BillW50 said:
Great idea if you plan on installing it on other machines. Although if
we are talking about just one machine, backup and recovery does even
better. As not only do you have the latest SP, but also all of the
latest security patches, installed applications, all necessarily
drivers, etc.

The sad thing about backup and recovery method, is it's hard to test to
see if the recovery actually works. What I like even better is cloning
drives for backing up. Thus after cloning, I use the cloned one and put
the original away for safe keeping.


I am surprised you didn't include the Unofficial SP5 for Windows 2000
too. That includes all patches that was released after SP4.

Is the Rollup in a format suited to slipstreaming ? Or is your
"SP5" different than the Rollup ? AFAIK, the Rollup doesn't
materially change the Win2K OS, in terms of installation issues.
Your install would work as well, if only SP4, and then you
could run the Rollup .exe after that.

*******

Slipstreaming is for cases where the behavior of the initial
installation is potentially improved. Nobody wants to spend
their day using an old installer CD, and reading crap like this.

"EnableBigLba"
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/303013

It's just easier to use a slipstreamed installer CD, to
get past that point.

Paul
 
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B

BillW50

Is the Rollup in a format suited to slipstreaming ? Or is your
"SP5" different than the Rollup ? AFAIK, the Rollup doesn't
materially change the Win2K OS, in terms of installation issues.
Your install would work as well, if only SP4, and then you
could run the Rollup .exe after that.

I thought it was ok for slipstreaming. As I looked for my Windows 2000
discs and mine I wrote "Windows 2000 SP4" on them. I must have created
them before SP5 was available.
*******

Slipstreaming is for cases where the behavior of the initial
installation is potentially improved. Nobody wants to spend
their day using an old installer CD, and reading crap like this.

"EnableBigLba"
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/303013

It's just easier to use a slipstreamed installer CD, to
get past that point.

Oh yes, indeed. I couldn't use Windows 2000 SP0 to install on my netbook
since netbooks doesn't have CD drives. But they work with USB optical
drives. Although Windows 2000 won't install from an USB optical drive
unless it is Windows 2000 SP4.

Same is true of Windows XP. As you need either SP2 or SP3 before it will
work. Well most of the time. I have one Alienware that had somebody
elses crap on it. I knew the optical drive wasn't working. So I used an
USB optical drive instead to install Alienware's XP SP2. It worked until
the final step and then the BSOD popped up. Well I was going to replace
the internal optical drive later, but later turned to now to get XP to
install.
 

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