Connecting a 4 pin voltage connector to the AsRock 775i65G motherboard


E

Eric

Hi,

I'm installing the AsRock 775i65G motherboard. Connecting the powersupply, a
Seasonic SS430-HB, to the motherboard turned out to be more difficult than I
thought.
First of all, I could not connect the 24 pin connector to the motherboard.
This connector actually consists of a 20 pin psu connector and 4 other pins.
The 4 other pins could be seperated easily from the rest of the connector by
cutting it off with a sharp knife. So after removing the 4 pins I ended up
with a 20 pin connector that can be connected to the motherboard, and 4
other pin with no obvious purpose to me. The colors of the wires of the 20
pin connector are, by the way, exactly the same colors of a 20 pin connector
of another psu I own - so the 20 pins should really be the 20 pin ATX
connector.

According to the manual of the motherboard a ATX 12 V plug must be connected
to a socket of 4 pins. First I thought the 4 pins I seperated had to be
connected to this socket, but this is impossible.
I then discovered a 6 pin connector of the psu. This 6 pin consists of 3
black wires of 3 yellow wires. Now here are my questions:
1) is the 6 pin connector the 12V plug?
2) what could the purpose of the 4 pins I separated (assuming it is not the
12 V plug)
3) should I really connect the 12V plug? Isn't the 20 pin connector
sufficient?

Thanks in advance!
 
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E

Eric

I have to add that the colors of the 4 pins seperated from the 24 pin
connector, are red, black, orange and yellow.
 
R

RobV

Eric said:
Hi,

I'm installing the AsRock 775i65G motherboard. Connecting the
powersupply, a Seasonic SS430-HB, to the motherboard turned out to be
more difficult than I thought.
First of all, I could not connect the 24 pin connector to the
motherboard. This connector actually consists of a 20 pin psu
connector and 4 other pins. The 4 other pins could be seperated
easily from the rest of the connector by cutting it off with a sharp
knife. So after removing the 4 pins I ended up with a 20 pin
connector that can be connected to the motherboard, and 4 other pin
with no obvious purpose to me. The colors of the wires of the 20 pin
connector are, by the way, exactly the same colors of a 20 pin
connector of another psu I own - so the 20 pins should really be the
20 pin ATX connector.
According to the manual of the motherboard a ATX 12 V plug must be
connected to a socket of 4 pins. First I thought the 4 pins I
seperated had to be connected to this socket, but this is impossible.
I then discovered a 6 pin connector of the psu. This 6 pin consists
of 3 black wires of 3 yellow wires. Now here are my questions:
1) is the 6 pin connector the 12V plug?

No, the six pin connector is a PCI-E connector for, as an example, a
video card that requires more power than it can get from the PCI-E
socket.
2) what could the purpose of the 4 pins I separated (assuming it is
not the 12 V plug)

Newer MBs require more current for certain on board devices, so the 20
pin ATX plug has been expanded to a 24 pin plug. That's what the extra
4 wires are for that you removed from the ATX plug. Since your MB
requires only a 20 pin ATX socket, 20 pins is all you need, and the
extra 4 wires are simply not used (anywhere).
3) should I really connect the 12V plug? Isn't the 20 pin connector
sufficient?

Since long ago (at least a few years), the CPU requires more current
than can be delivered from the ATX power plug (20, or 24 pin), so a
separate 4 pin connector is used to supply extra +12V to the CPU, due to
higher current demands. There should be a 4x4 connector from the PSU,
with two yellow and two black wires. This plugs into a 4x4 socket on
the MB. On your MB, the 4x4 socket is right behind the pink/red socket
at the back of the board, near the edge of the MB, sandwiched between a
bunch of capacitors and toroidal coils of wire.
Thanks in advance!

You're welcome.
 
R

RobV

RobV said:
No, the six pin connector is a PCI-E connector for, as an example, a
video card that requires more power than it can get from the PCI-E
socket.


Newer MBs require more current for certain on board devices, so the 20
pin ATX plug has been expanded to a 24 pin plug. That's what the
extra 4 wires are for that you removed from the ATX plug. Since your
MB requires only a 20 pin ATX socket, 20 pins is all you need, and the
extra 4 wires are simply not used (anywhere).


Since long ago (at least a few years), the CPU requires more current
than can be delivered from the ATX power plug (20, or 24 pin), so a
separate 4 pin connector is used to supply extra +12V to the CPU, due
to higher current demands. There should be a 4x4 connector from the
PSU, with two yellow and two black wires. This plugs into a 4x4
socket on the MB. On your MB, the 4x4 socket is right behind the
pink/red socket at the back of the board, near the edge of the MB,
sandwiched between a bunch of capacitors and toroidal coils of wire.


Sorry, that should be 2x2 (4 pin) connector (two yellow, two black
wires). The plug and socket are keyed so it will go in only one way.

Need more caffiene; sorry for the mistake.
 
E

Eric

Sorry, that should be 2x2 (4 pin) connector (two yellow, two black wires).
The plug and socket are keyed so it will go in only one way.

Need more caffiene; sorry for the mistake.
Never mind. I found the 2x2 pin connector and was able to connect it to the
motherboard easily.

Thanks a lot for the explanation, it made things a lot more clear!
 
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R

RobV

Eric said:
Never mind. I found the 2x2 pin connector and was able to connect it
to the motherboard easily.

Thanks a lot for the explanation, it made things a lot more clear!

That's great! I'm glad you could get it set up properly and you're
welcome. Have a great New Year!
 
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