Comments on a Netbook?


J

JD

Hi Experts :)

I am thinking of buying a Netbook, as a substitute
for Internet Radio, and for taking with me while
traveling. Costco recently had a Samsung N150 that
was priced at $280 and they sold out quickly. This
(2010) June issue of Consumer Reports rated about
28 models and the Samsung came first. The price
they quoted was $350.

If anyone has had experience of this Netbook I
would appreciate some comments.
In particular, how "gutted" is version the Windows 7?

This is the manufacturer's URL:

http://www.samsung.com/us/consumer/...JA01US/index.idx?pagetype=prd_detail&tab=spec

TIA


The following is a list of the "specs."

Operating System Operating System Genuine
Windows® 7 Starter
Processor Processor Intel® ATOM™ Processor N450
(1.66 GHz, 667 MHz, 512 KB)
Memory System Memory 1 GB (DDR2 / 1 GB x 1)
Display LCD 10.1" WSVGA (1,024 x 600),
Non-Gloss, LED Back Light
Graphic Graphic Processor Intel GMA3150 (Int.
Graphic)
Multimedia Sound HD (High Definition) Audio
Sound Effect SRS 3D Sound Effect
Multimedia Player No
Speaker 3 W Stereo Speaker (1.5 W x 2)
Integrated Camera Web Camera
Storage HDD 160 GB (5,400 rpm S-ATA)
ODD No
Communication Wired Ethernet LAN 10 / 100 LAN
Wireless LAN 802.11 bg / n
Bluetooth No
I/O Port VGA Yes
HDMI No
Headphone-out Headphone-out
Mic-in Yes
Internal Mic Yes
PC CardBus Slot No
USB (Chargable USB included)
3 x USB 2.0
Multi Card Slot 3-in-1 (SD, SDHC, MMC)
Dock Port No
RJ11 (Modem) No
RJ45 (LAN) Yes
DC-In (Power Port) Yes
Input Keyboard Type 83 Key
Touch Pad, Touch Screen Touch Pad (Scroll Scope,
Flat Type)
Power AC Adapter 40 Watt
Standard Battery 6 Cell
Dimensions Dimension (W x D x H inches) 10.4" x
7.4" x 0.97" ~ 1.37"
Weight (lb) 2.73 lbs
 
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R

Roy

Hi Experts  :)

I am thinking of buying a Netbook, as a substitute
for Internet Radio, and for taking with me while
traveling. Costco recently had a Samsung N150 that
was priced at $280 and they sold out quickly. This
(2010) June issue of Consumer Reports rated about
28 models and the Samsung came first. The price
they quoted was $350.

If anyone has had experience of this Netbook I
would appreciate some comments.
In particular, how "gutted" is version the Windows 7?

This is the manufacturer's URL:

http://www.samsung.com/us/consumer/office/mobile-computing/netbooks/N...

TIA

The following is a list of the "specs."

Operating System  Operating System  Genuine
Windows® 7 Starter
Processor  Processor  Intel® ATOM™ Processor N450
(1.66 GHz, 667 MHz, 512 KB)
Memory  System Memory  1 GB (DDR2 / 1 GB x 1)
Display  LCD  10.1" WSVGA (1,024 x 600),
Non-Gloss, LED Back Light
Graphic  Graphic Processor  Intel GMA3150 (Int.
Graphic)
Multimedia  Sound  HD (High Definition) Audio
Sound Effect  SRS 3D Sound Effect
Multimedia Player  No
Speaker  3 W Stereo Speaker (1.5 W x 2)
Integrated Camera  Web Camera
Storage  HDD  160 GB (5,400 rpm S-ATA)
ODD  No
Communication  Wired Ethernet LAN  10 / 100 LAN
Wireless LAN  802.11 bg / n
Bluetooth  No
I/O Port  VGA  Yes
HDMI  No
Headphone-out  Headphone-out
Mic-in  Yes
Internal Mic  Yes
PC CardBus Slot  No
USB  (Chargable USB included)
3 x USB 2.0
Multi Card Slot  3-in-1 (SD, SDHC, MMC)
Dock Port  No
RJ11 (Modem)  No
RJ45 (LAN)  Yes
DC-In (Power Port)  Yes
Input  Keyboard Type  83 Key
Touch Pad, Touch Screen  Touch Pad (Scroll Scope,
Flat Type)
Power  AC Adapter  40 Watt
Standard Battery  6 Cell
Dimensions  Dimension (W x D x H inches)  10.4" x
7.4" x 0.97" ~ 1.37"
Weight (lb)  2.73 lbs

Window Xp home is much better OS than seven starter for netbooks ,,,I
had an acquintance who did it and was much pleased with it
 
J

JD

Roy said:
Window Xp home is much better OS than seven starter for netbooks ,,,I
had an acquintance who did it and was much pleased with it

Thanks Roy. I still use Win2K and might try it. Xp
Home is probably a bit faster
and more efficient and I'll certainly consider it.
 
J

J G Miller

I still use Win2K and might try it. Xp Home is probably a bit faster
and more efficient and I'll certainly consider it.

If you switched to Mint Linux or Ubuntu or openSUSE you would find those
even more effecient and you would not have to worry about all those
anti-virus and spyware programs that you have to keep loaded to protect
your MS system from becoming part of a Botnet.
 
J

JD

J said:
If you switched to Mint Linux or Ubuntu or openSUSE you would find those
even more effecient and you would not have to worry about all those
anti-virus and spyware programs that you have to keep loaded to protect
your MS system from becoming part of a Botnet.

Thank you JGM.

Probably true, but what about the learning curve?
I might consider installing a Windows
OS first and a Linux on a different partition
until I get it (the Linux ) running smoothly.
I'll chew on that one for a bit.
 
J

J G Miller

Probably true, but what about the learning curve?

Well nowadays, GNU/Linux systems can effectively be used at two levels.

1) The desktop point and click.

2) Working on and exploiting the system underneath.

If you are just being a "user" using things like a browser,
e-mail, writing documents, then the (1) scenario above is
pretty much the same style of operation as MS Windoze, just
learning where the items you want are on the menu.
I might consider installing a Windows
OS first and a Linux on a different partition until I get it (the Linux
) running smoothly. I'll chew on that one for a bit.

Yes by all means create a dual boot system, then if you need to use
some Windoze specific software (eg games) you can be certain you
will be able to run it natively, but for the serious stuff and
any network activity (browsing, e-mail etc) just use Linux because
it is so much safer and in the end, easier and more versatile.

So do your Windoze install on a limited portion of the disk,
then go to your local bookstore and pick up a Linux magazine
with a live DVD and try it out, and if you like it, install
it on the rest of the disk.
 
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J

JD

J said:
Well nowadays, GNU/Linux systems can effectively be used at two levels.

1) The desktop point and click.

2) Working on and exploiting the system underneath.

If you are just being a "user" using things like a browser,
e-mail, writing documents, then the (1) scenario above is
pretty much the same style of operation as MS Windoze, just
learning where the items you want are on the menu.


Yes by all means create a dual boot system, then if you need to use
some Windoze specific software (eg games) you can be certain you
will be able to run it natively, but for the serious stuff and
any network activity (browsing, e-mail etc) just use Linux because
it is so much safer and in the end, easier and more versatile.

So do your Windoze install on a limited portion of the disk,
then go to your local bookstore and pick up a Linux magazine
with a live DVD and try it out, and if you like it, install
it on the rest of the disk.
Thank you JGM - good advice!

I had an interesting experience about 18 months
ago when I
started up my Windows program and found that the
hard drives
were missing.
By sheer accident I had on my desk a Mepis Linux
that I had received
a few weeks earlier. I popped it in the CDR and
restarted my box.
To my astonishment Linux started up and loaded.
This was my first ever
experience of a Linux. I played around with it for
about an hour and I
actually succeeded in going online and browsed
away for an hour or so.
Then I opened up my computer, re-set the
appropriate connections, and
after a restart it ran ok. I still have that
Linux CD but I'll now need an
upgrade for the Netbook.
 
T

Tim Mastrogiacomo

Hi Experts  :)

I am thinking of buying a Netbook, as a substitute
for Internet Radio, and for taking with me while
traveling. Costco recently had a Samsung N150 that
was priced at $280 and they sold out quickly. This
(2010) June issue of Consumer Reports rated about
28 models and the Samsung came first. The price
they quoted was $350.

If anyone has had experience of this Netbook I
would appreciate some comments.
In particular, how "gutted" is version the Windows 7?

This is the manufacturer's URL:

http://www.samsung.com/us/consumer/office/mobile-computing/netbooks/N...

TIA

The following is a list of the "specs."

If you're not looking to buy something immediately, you might want to
keep an eye on netbooks coming out with the new Google OS. I just read
that Acer announced one today:
http://www.newsfactor.com/news/Acer...story.xhtml?story_id=0320011M35Y8&full_skip=1


Tim Mastrogiacomo
 
G

Gorby

Hi Experts :)

I am thinking of buying a Netbook, as a substitute for Internet Radio,
and for taking with me while traveling. Costco recently had a Samsung
N150 that was priced at $280 and they sold out quickly. This (2010) June
issue of Consumer Reports rated about 28 models and the Samsung came
first. The price they quoted was $350.

If anyone has had experience of this Netbook I would appreciate some
comments.
In particular, how "gutted" is version the Windows 7?

This is the manufacturer's URL:

http://www.samsung.com/us/consumer/...JA01US/index.idx?pagetype=prd_detail&tab=spec


TIA


The following is a list of the "specs."

Operating System Operating System Genuine Windows® 7 Starter
Processor Processor Intel® ATOM™ Processor N450 (1.66 GHz, 667 MHz, 512 KB)
Memory System Memory 1 GB (DDR2 / 1 GB x 1)
Display LCD 10.1" WSVGA (1,024 x 600), Non-Gloss, LED Back Light
Graphic Graphic Processor Intel GMA3150 (Int. Graphic)
Multimedia Sound HD (High Definition) Audio
Sound Effect SRS 3D Sound Effect
Multimedia Player No
Speaker 3 W Stereo Speaker (1.5 W x 2)
Integrated Camera Web Camera
Storage HDD 160 GB (5,400 rpm S-ATA)
ODD No
Communication Wired Ethernet LAN 10 / 100 LAN
Wireless LAN 802.11 bg / n
Bluetooth No
I/O Port VGA Yes
HDMI No
Headphone-out Headphone-out
Mic-in Yes
Internal Mic Yes
PC CardBus Slot No
USB (Chargable USB included)
3 x USB 2.0
Multi Card Slot 3-in-1 (SD, SDHC, MMC)
Dock Port No
RJ11 (Modem) No
RJ45 (LAN) Yes
DC-In (Power Port) Yes
Input Keyboard Type 83 Key
Touch Pad, Touch Screen Touch Pad (Scroll Scope, Flat Type)
Power AC Adapter 40 Watt
Standard Battery 6 Cell
Dimensions Dimension (W x D x H inches) 10.4" x 7.4" x 0.97" ~ 1.37"
Weight (lb) 2.73 lbs
Comments regarding Windows or Linux on Netbooks.

As people won't really want to play the high powered 3d games on a
netbook, the need for Windows OS becomes very small.

I purchased an EeePC Netbook with WinXP, last year before going on an
overseas vacation. I found I had a learning curve as the small screen
meant I had to be careful opening windows. Managing the space.

So I thought "I'm really noticing the difference in using this PC! Let's
try Linux!"

First, let's just be sure what we are going to do on this thing:
1)Web Browsing - and this includes Gmail.
2)Storing digital photos.
3)Skype.
4) Accessing my email.
5) being able to open attachments in email.
6) a bit of word processing.

Linux (Ububtu - I'm a bit new so don't know many distros- I've since
heard there are better distros for Netbooks) turned out to be fine. It
did not hog as much screen real estate as windows.

I used Open Office for Word Processing, Firefox for browsing and
Thunderbird for email, and Skype.

It all worked! It was quick. It was easy. I didn't use any command-line.
I simply used the Netbook on my vacation.

I don't use it at home as I have my Workstation (Windows 7, Office 2007,
etc).

I would have to say I found the Netbook better with Linux than WinXP.
Windows 7 is better than XP (in my opinion), but the small amount of
screen space really matters on Netbooks. I think Linux gave me more
space to play with.
 
J

JD

Gorby said:
Comments regarding Windows or Linux on Netbooks.

As people won't really want to play the high powered 3d games on a
netbook, the need for Windows OS becomes very small.

I purchased an EeePC Netbook with WinXP, last year before going on an
overseas vacation. I found I had a learning curve as the small screen
meant I had to be careful opening windows. Managing the space.

So I thought "I'm really noticing the difference in using this PC! Let's
try Linux!"

First, let's just be sure what we are going to do on this thing:
1)Web Browsing - and this includes Gmail.
2)Storing digital photos.
3)Skype.
4) Accessing my email.
5) being able to open attachments in email.
6) a bit of word processing.

Linux (Ububtu - I'm a bit new so don't know many distros- I've since
heard there are better distros for Netbooks) turned out to be fine. It
did not hog as much screen real estate as windows.

I used Open Office for Word Processing, Firefox for browsing and
Thunderbird for email, and Skype.

It all worked! It was quick. It was easy. I didn't use any command-line.
I simply used the Netbook on my vacation.

I don't use it at home as I have my Workstation (Windows 7, Office 2007,
etc).

I would have to say I found the Netbook better with Linux than WinXP.
Windows 7 is better than XP (in my opinion), but the small amount of
screen space really matters on Netbooks. I think Linux gave me more
space to play with.

Thank you Gorby,

That was a considerable help. I am not planning to
travel for another 3 months and, from what you
say, I think it would be a good idea to install
the Linux and play with it for a while. Is it easy
to find reasonably recent versions of Open Office,
Firefox and TBird?
I'm familiar with all 3 in Windows, so that aspect
would make things easier for me.

Yesterday I visited Pricewatch.com and found that
Amazon had the best prices but I had some bad
deals from it in the past. I visited it last night
and found that the only way I could ask questions
about the Netbook was to buy it first. Then I
visited TigerDirect and, although they cost
another $20 or more there + shipping. The wierd
thing is that the red and blue colored Samsung
N150s cost $300 and the black costs $330.

Back again soon and you, have a great week ahead :)
 
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J

Joel

JD said:
Thank you Gorby,

That was a considerable help. I am not planning to
travel for another 3 months and, from what you
say, I think it would be a good idea to install
the Linux and play with it for a while. Is it easy
to find reasonably recent versions of Open Office,
Firefox and TBird?
I'm familiar with all 3 in Windows, so that aspect
would make things easier for me.

Yesterday I visited Pricewatch.com and found that
Amazon had the best prices but I had some bad
deals from it in the past. I visited it last night
and found that the only way I could ask questions
about the Netbook was to buy it first. Then I
visited TigerDirect and, although they cost
another $20 or more there + shipping. The wierd
thing is that the red and blue colored Samsung
N150s cost $300 and the black costs $330.

Back again soon and you, have a great week ahead :)

Me? I would say forget about Linux or similar. Unless you don't want to
use your laptop for anything else but staring at the Linux.

Or if Linux is that great then most people would dump Windows for free
Linux years ago. So to me, Linux may be ok and could be great choice if
there is no better choice. I have never looked at Linux, but I started with
Unix, CP/M, DOS, OS/2 etc.. so I think Linux probably similar to either Unix
or CP/M (or may be it has GUI interface now?)
 
J

J G Miller

So to me, Linux may be ok and could be great choice if
there is no better choice.

How do you know whether it may be "ok", when you next write
I have never looked at Linux

And then you ask
(or may be it has GUI interface now?)

which proves how totally clueless any advice you have to offer really is.

So your statement

"I would say forget about Linux or similar."

is totally worthless and should be completely ignored.
 
G

Gorby

How do you know whether it may be "ok", when you next write


And then you ask


which proves how totally clueless any advice you have to offer really is.

So your statement

"I would say forget about Linux or similar."

is totally worthless and should be completely ignored.

I think Microsoft would like to kill the Netbook.

Netbooks are small, both in power, capacity and physical size.
Windows does not neatly fit in a Netbook. Netbooks have a smaller amount
of RAM and slower, single threaded, CPUs. Vista does not run well on a
Netbook.

Secondly, Netbooks have a smaller screen. Windows easily gets cluttered
in small real estate.

Anything that threatens MS dominance in PC OS's is usually dealt with
very quickly, and harshly, by MS.

I like Netbooks for what they are! Small, easily used temporary light
weight PCs. And they do it well! You don't do your daily work on a
Netbook. You use the work PC or home PC. I used my Netbook on vacation
and it did everything I wanted it to do.

I updated my Facebook page so people could see where we were. Added
photos. Used Skype to talk to family and friends. Cranked out a letter
on Word (actually Open Office). Looked up our itinerary that was stored
on Excel (Open Office again). Booked Hotels, cars and tours via the
internet.

I did not tend to open a lot of windows. As I said there is not a lot of
space on a Netbook.

It made me rethink the way I use my PCs. At home I tend to keep a lot of
windows open at the same time. There is no real need to. I don't use
even a quarter of the features that MS Office has.

I have not given Linux much thought before. I tried it once a few years
ago, but found it too finicky. Windows is not a good fit on Netbooks. I
have a Windows 6.1 based cellphone. And I don't think that is a good OS
for a phone, either. If it wasn't for Windows 7 (which I think is good),
I would look more seriously at Linux on my home PC. I'm not upgrading my
MS Office until it becomes totally unsupported. Maybe then going Open
Office, as MS Office is expensive, when I don't use most of the features.

Oops! A bit of a rant there. Sorry.

Cra
 
J

Joel

J G Miller said:
How do you know whether it may be "ok", when you next write

If it's okay then it is ok.
And then you ask

No need
which proves how totally clueless any advice you have to offer really is.

I agree, and welcome to the club.
So your statement

"I would say forget about Linux or similar."

is totally worthless and should be completely ignored.

Again, I too agree with you that it's worthless.
 
J

Joel

kony said:
Linux makes a lot of sense on a netbook. Consider:

1) Most people aren't trying to use the netbook with ALL
the apps they might want on their desktop, it's mainly for
one purpose, and/or surfing and email, maybe a bit of light
office work, all of which is fine on Linux if, as the prior
reply indicated, the user is already familiar with the same
apps on windows.

2) Netbooks at low price have Win7 starter version, a
castrated OS with only one goal - to try to encourage people
to pay a premium for yet another upgraded Win7 license which
is WAY too expensive, far too high a % of the total cost of
a netbook.

3) Netbooks have slower CPU, usually less memory and
storage. If win98 had contemporary hardware and app support
(and was stable), it would be the ideal netbook OS.
Unfortunately it doesn't, and XP also falling out of support
so there is no Windows OS remaining that is fit for a
netbook. Sure you can run Win7, and make what could have
been a snappy system for the intended purposes, run like a
snail instead.

Main point is, no netbook should ship with Win7 starter, if
someone wants a slug of a netbook then a higher Win7
version, or Linux install as the default OS then let people
buy Win7 without the Win7 starter version tax already paid
as part of the netbook price.

Some company give buyer the option to buy notebook without OS. And for
me, and I am real sure most people use notebook more than Linux has to
offer.
 
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J

J G Miller

On what evidence do you base this conlusion?

.... this con*c*lusion?

Especially since you have already declared

"I have never looked at Linux"

and therefore have no knowledge of what GNU/Linux does have to offer.
 
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G

Gorby

Base on a handful of people just learned the idea.
I *have* used a Netbook with Windows and Linux.
Netbooks can't do a lot in Windows, because the are low powered CPUs and
small amounts of RAM. And, more importantly, they have small screens.
You do a lot of scrolling just to see stuff, on a netbook. Bit of a pain
if you are using an inbuilt touch pad.

I found using Office2007 with its ribbon interface took even more screen
real estate.

As I said before Netbooks are great for doing things that you can't do
on your smartphone. I can see no need for one other than intermittent,
casual use while travelling. If you have real work then use your laptop
or work/home PC.

I noticed that Netbooks originally were sold with Linux, but quickly
changed to Windows, as that is better known. I think that was a mistake.

I have played around with my EeePC Netbook, with Windows XP, Windows 7
and Linux (Ubuntu - I've heard that there are better distributions for
Netbooks). Windows XP was usable, Windows 7 was better, yet Linux seemed
the best for what I wanted (but not by much - Better screen real estate)
 

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