Burned out Maxtor hard drive


W

winelover

I have a Maxtor one touch 250 gig hard drive. By mistake, I plugged a
digital camera adapter into the back of it. The camera was a 5.0 volt
adapter and the Maxtor is a 3.0 volt adapter. The hard drive will not
power up. Does anyone have any experience with something like this?
Do you think I can get a new exterior enclosure and it would work? I
have a feeling the drive is still good but the wiring is burned out.
Thanks for the help.

Rion
 
Ad

Advertisements

R

Rod Speed

winelover said:
I have a Maxtor one touch 250 gig hard drive. By mistake, I plugged a
digital camera adapter into the back of it. The camera was a 5.0 volt
adapter and the Maxtor is a 3.0 volt adapter.
You sure its 3V ?
The hard drive will not power up. Does anyone have any experience with
something like this? Do you think I can get a new exterior enclosure
Unlikely.

and it would work?
Probably, but it isnt certain.
I have a feeling the drive is still good but the wiring is burned out.
Its not the wiring, its what turns the alleged 3V into what the drive needs, 5V and 12V.
 
A

Arno Wagner

Previously winelover said:
I have a Maxtor one touch 250 gig hard drive. By mistake, I plugged a
digital camera adapter into the back of it. The camera was a 5.0 volt
adapter and the Maxtor is a 3.0 volt adapter. The hard drive will not
power up. Does anyone have any experience with something like this?
Do you think I can get a new exterior enclosure and it would work? I
have a feeling the drive is still good but the wiring is burned out.
Thanks for the help.
That does not sound right. Alternatively, the 3V has its polarity
reversed. In that case, the drive is very likely toast and only
professional data recovery can help, since the read amplifier
(inside the case) has very likely been damaged as well and in
addition may have filled the interiour with smoke.

Arno
 
D

Dave

I have a Maxtor one touch 250 gig hard drive. By mistake, I plugged a
digital camera adapter into the back of it. The camera was a 5.0 volt
adapter and the Maxtor is a 3.0 volt adapter. The hard drive will not
power up. Does anyone have any experience with something like this?
Do you think I can get a new exterior enclosure and it would work? I
have a feeling the drive is still good but the wiring is burned out.
Thanks for the help.

Rion
I'm not as knowledgeable as Rod and Arno, but I've got to think that
the drive is smoked with such a scenario. Semiconductors will fail,
not wiring.
Dave
 
A

Arno Wagner

Previously Dave said:
On 26 Feb 2007 09:20:24 -0800, "winelover" <Rlobrutto@gmail.com>
wrote:
I'm not as knowledgeable as Rod and Arno, but I've got to think that
the drive is smoked with such a scenario. Semiconductors will fail,
not wiring.
Dave
You are definitely right on this: Wires can take a lot more abuse than
most semiconductors can.

Arno
 
F

Folkert Rienstra

I'm not as knowledgeable as Rod and Arno,
In which case you must be downright stupid.
but I've got to think that the drive is smoked with such a scenario.
Semiconductors will fail, not wiring.
By wiring he obviously meant the electrical innards of the enclosure, besides the harddrive.

Just as poorly worded as your "drive is smoked".

What is "smoked" may simply be a fuse.
 
O

Odie Ferrous

Folkert said:
In which case you must be downright stupid.
Bad day, Folkert? Judging on your recent posts. Shame - I'd help if I
could. Get better soon.


Odie
 
R

Rod Speed

Bad day, Folkert? Judging on your recent posts.
Shame - I'd help if I could. Get better soon.
The only viable approach would be a bullet in the back of the neck.
 
D

Dave

I'm not as knowledgeable as Rod and Arno,
In which case you must be downright stupid.



By wiring he obviously meant the electrical innards of the enclosure, besides the harddrive.
Yes--I think you're right upon re-reading.
Just as poorly worded as your "drive is smoked". The meaning is clear.
What is "smoked" may simply be a fuse.
Interesting--Did not know drives are fused. I hpe this is the case
for the OP. Perhaps a new exterior enclosure will fix that.
Dave
 
A

Arno Wagner

Previously Dave said:
Yes--I think you're right upon re-reading.
Interesting--Did not know drives are fused. I hpe this is the case
for the OP. Perhaps a new exterior enclosure will fix that.
Hdds often have fuses. They just don't look like fuses anymore and
need SMD-soldering skills to replace.

Arno
 
D

Dave

Hdds often have fuses. They just don't look like fuses anymore and
need SMD-soldering skills to replace.

Arno
Interesting. Not sure why they would chose SMD style fusing. If the
OP's drive is critical, maybe it's worth a shot to have a local tech
check it out.
 
A

Arno Wagner

Interesting. Not sure why they would chose SMD style fusing.
Very simple: Height. There is no space for conventional fuses. They
are at least 5mm in height. A second argument is that mounting
non-SMD componens on mainly SMD boards is typically done manually
and expensive.
If the
OP's drive is critical, maybe it's worth a shot to have a local tech
check it out.
If the OP can find a competent tech, definitely. The first step wpuld
be to check whether the fuses are actually blown.

Arno
 
D

Dave

Very simple: Height. There is no space for conventional fuses. They
are at least 5mm in height. A second argument is that mounting
non-SMD componens on mainly SMD boards is typically done manually
and expensive.
I considered size, but not manual mounting. I see.
Dave
 
O

Odie Ferrous

Arno said:
Very simple: Height. There is no space for conventional fuses. They
are at least 5mm in height. A second argument is that mounting
non-SMD componens on mainly SMD boards is typically done manually
and expensive.


If the OP can find a competent tech, definitely. The first step wpuld
be to check whether the fuses are actually blown.

Arno
If you can spew forth the actual part number of the drive, I will be
able to tell you if there is a fuse present.

If so, for data recovery purposes, the connection can generally be
shorted in order that data can be recovered.

Bear in mind, though, that most drives do not have fuses and that the
problem can point to something far more serious.


Odie
 
F

Folkert Rienstra

Dave said:
Yes--I think you're right upon re-reading.
The meaning is clear.
About as clear as what you first misunderstood. Yeah, right.
Interesting--Did not know drives are fused.
Some are and some not. But who said anything about disk drive fuses.
The topic is obviously the drive cabinet.
I hope this is the case for the OP.
If we are talking drive cabinet, then yes.
Perhaps a new exterior enclosure will fix that.
Right.
Or replace the fuse in the drive cabinet if it is self protecting.

So how come you went along with the babblebot who was
obviously talking about disk drive fuses, not cabinet fuses.
 
F

Folkert Rienstra

No, they don't.

Because they don't expect repair?

Very simple: Height. There is no space for conventional fuses.
They are at least 5mm in height.
The babblebot git obviously never heard of PICO fuses.
A second argument is that mounting non-SMD componens on
mainly SMD boards is typically done manually and expensive.
It's more likely that SMD fuse holders are relatively expensive
and therefor not widely used.

Also, a fuse is to prevent a malfunctioning device to start problems
elsewhere. So if a fuse blows, the device malfunctioned.
One shouldn't simply replace the fuse without reverting the cause.

Unless a drive is overvoltage protected by blowing the fuse, one should
expect that overvoltage killed (fused) the electronics and that that in
turn blew the fuse.
If the OP can find a competent tech, definitely. The first step
would be to check whether the fuses are actually blown.
Who said anything about drive fuses.
 
A

Arno Wagner

If you can spew forth the actual part number of the drive, I will be
able to tell you if there is a fuse present.
You have a database? Cool!
If so, for data recovery purposes, the connection can generally be
shorted in order that data can be recovered.
Indeed.

Bear in mind, though, that most drives do not have fuses and that the
problem can point to something far more serious.
As destroyed electronics. Even with fuses there is a risk
of that.

Arno
 
Ad

Advertisements


Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top