AMD-ATI Radeon "HD 2000" series - R600 has 320 Stream Processors, 512-bit memory interface


A

AirRaid Mach 2.5

ATI Releases More "R600" Details


http://www.dailytech.com/article.aspx?newsid=6903

http://images.dailytech.com/nimage/4445_large_4434_large_r600_2.jpg


"R600" OEM image courtesy of PCinlife
320-stream processors, named ATI Radeon HD 2900

AMD has named the rest of its upcoming ATI Radeon DirectX 10 product
lineup. The new DirectX 10 product family received the ATI Radeon HD
2000-series moniker. For the new product generation, AMD has tagged HD
to the product name to designate the entire lineup's Avivo HD
technology. AMD has also removed the X-prefix on its product models.

At the top of the DirectX 10 chain, is the ATI Radeon HD 2900 XT. The
AMD ATI Radeon HD 2900-series features 320 stream processors, over
twice as many as NVIDIA's GeForce 8800 GTX. AMD couples the 320 stream
processors with a 512-bit memory interface with eight channels.
CrossFire support is now natively supported by the AMD ATI Radeon HD
2900-series; the external CrossFire dongle is a thing of the past.

The R600-based ATI Radeon HD 2900-series products also support 128-bit
HDR rendering. AMD has also upped the ante on anti-aliasing support.
The ATI Radeon HD 2900-series supports up to 24x anti-aliasing.
NVIDIA's GeForce 8800-series only supports up to 16x anti-aliasing.
AMD's ATI Radeon HD 2900-series also possesses physics processing.

New to the ATI Radeon HD 2900-series are integrated HDMI output
capabilities with 5.1 surround sound. However, early images of AMD's
OEM R600 reveal dual dual-link DVI outputs, rendering the audio
functions useless.

AMD's RV630-based products will carry the ATI Radeon HD 2600 moniker
with Pro and XT models. The value-targeted RV610-based products will
carry the ATI Radeon HD 2400 name with Pro and XT models as well.

The entire AMD ATI Radeon HD 2000-family features the latest Avivo HD
technology. AMD's upgraded Avivo with a new Universal Video Decoder,
also known as UVD, and the new Advanced Video Processor, or AVP. UVD
previously made its debut in the OEM-exclusive RV550 GPU core. UVD
provides hardware acceleration of H.264 and VC-1 high definition video
formats used by Blu-ray and HD DVD. The AVP allows the GPU to apply
hardware acceleration and video processing functions while keeping
power consumption low.

Expect AMD to launch the ATI Radeon HD 2000-family in the upcoming
weeks, if AMD doesn't push back the launch dates further.
 
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A

Air Raid

the subject should've said "Radeon HD 2900" not "Radeon HD 2000",
sorry.
 
H

HockeyTownUSA

AirRaid Mach 2.5 said:
ATI Releases More "R600" Details


http://www.dailytech.com/article.aspx?newsid=6903

http://images.dailytech.com/nimage/4445_large_4434_large_r600_2.jpg


"R600" OEM image courtesy of PCinlife
320-stream processors, named ATI Radeon HD 2900

AMD has named the rest of its upcoming ATI Radeon DirectX 10 product
lineup. The new DirectX 10 product family received the ATI Radeon HD
2000-series moniker. For the new product generation, AMD has tagged HD
to the product name to designate the entire lineup's Avivo HD
technology. AMD has also removed the X-prefix on its product models.

At the top of the DirectX 10 chain, is the ATI Radeon HD 2900 XT. The
AMD ATI Radeon HD 2900-series features 320 stream processors, over
twice as many as NVIDIA's GeForce 8800 GTX. AMD couples the 320 stream
processors with a 512-bit memory interface with eight channels.
CrossFire support is now natively supported by the AMD ATI Radeon HD
2900-series; the external CrossFire dongle is a thing of the past.

The R600-based ATI Radeon HD 2900-series products also support 128-bit
HDR rendering. AMD has also upped the ante on anti-aliasing support.
The ATI Radeon HD 2900-series supports up to 24x anti-aliasing.
NVIDIA's GeForce 8800-series only supports up to 16x anti-aliasing.
AMD's ATI Radeon HD 2900-series also possesses physics processing.

New to the ATI Radeon HD 2900-series are integrated HDMI output
capabilities with 5.1 surround sound. However, early images of AMD's
OEM R600 reveal dual dual-link DVI outputs, rendering the audio
functions useless.

AMD's RV630-based products will carry the ATI Radeon HD 2600 moniker
with Pro and XT models. The value-targeted RV610-based products will
carry the ATI Radeon HD 2400 name with Pro and XT models as well.

The entire AMD ATI Radeon HD 2000-family features the latest Avivo HD
technology. AMD's upgraded Avivo with a new Universal Video Decoder,
also known as UVD, and the new Advanced Video Processor, or AVP. UVD
previously made its debut in the OEM-exclusive RV550 GPU core. UVD
provides hardware acceleration of H.264 and VC-1 high definition video
formats used by Blu-ray and HD DVD. The AVP allows the GPU to apply
hardware acceleration and video processing functions while keeping
power consumption low.

Expect AMD to launch the ATI Radeon HD 2000-family in the upcoming
weeks, if AMD doesn't push back the launch dates further.
Why the need for 24x Anti-Aliasing? First of all, these suckers can probably
run pretty much anything DirectX 10 at 1600x1200 (or 1680x1050) full tilt.
At that resolution, jaggies are almost already eliminated. Just add 4x or 6x
and it'll be pretty much gone altogether. What they really need is a smarter
algorithm that just compensates for jaggies where it needs it on the fly
without being 4x, 8x or whatever factor.
 
N

noman

Why the need for 24x Anti-Aliasing? First of all, these suckers can probably
run pretty much anything DirectX 10 at 1600x1200 (or 1680x1050) full tilt.
At that resolution, jaggies are almost already eliminated. Just add 4x or 6x
and it'll be pretty much gone altogether. What they really need is a smarter
algorithm that just compensates for jaggies where it needs it on the fly
without being 4x, 8x or whatever factor.
One of the features in DX10.1 is that developers can pick the aliasing
pattern they want based on the rendered scene. So instead of, let's
say, a box pattern, with corners averaged onto the centre of the box,
one can pick all four samples in a straight line.

Of course, this will require support from the hardware. As far as I
know, the sampling patterns for multi-sampling in the current graphic
chipsets are all hard-coded, instead of being programmable.
 
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F

First of One

The sampling patterns in ATi cards from the Radeon 9500 and up are
programmable. In fact, "temporal AA" works by employing two different
sampling patterns every other frame to create the illusion of greater line
smoothness. When nVidia introduced transparency AA on the Geforce7, ATi
brought forth Adaptive AA in a driver update, but made it retroactive on all
the 9x00 cards.

ATi may very well claim DX10.1 compliance when the HD 2900 launches, much
like it claimed DX8.1 compliance with the Radeon 8500. (It gave the 8500 a
paper advantage over the DX8.0-compliant Geforce3, with no developer support
except from Futuremark.)
 

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