Advice request: do I plug my cases' fans on mobo or case's connectors ?


C

Castor Nageur

Hi all,

I am going to order the Thermaltake Element V for my new Asus mobo:

http://www.thermaltakeusa.com/Product.aspx?C=1420&ID=1900#Tab0

My new mobo will be the Asus M4A89TD PRO USB3:

http://www.asus.com/Motherboards/AMD_AM3/M4A89TD_PROUSB3

The mobo manual specify the following fans' connectors:

CPU_FAN: CPU fan connector
PWR_FAN: PSU fan connector
CHA_FAN1: chassis fan 1
CHA_FAN2: chassis fan 2

I get confused because the case's manual specify that all the case's
fans should be connected to a centralized power controlled by a fan
speed button which is part of the case with no communication with the
mobo.

I suppose that I can use the CHA_FAN1 and CHA_FAN2 to connect 2 of the
5 fans provided with the Thermaltake Element V case so I can monitor
the fan speeds.

* But should I really do this ?
* Does the mobo provide enough powers for the big fans ?

Thanks in advance for helping me.
 
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N

Nobody > (Revisited)

Hi all,

I am going to order the Thermaltake Element V for my new Asus mobo:

http://www.thermaltakeusa.com/Product.aspx?C=1420&ID=1900#Tab0

My new mobo will be the Asus M4A89TD PRO USB3:

http://www.asus.com/Motherboards/AMD_AM3/M4A89TD_PROUSB3

The mobo manual specify the following fans' connectors:

CPU_FAN: CPU fan connector
PWR_FAN: PSU fan connector
CHA_FAN1: chassis fan 1
CHA_FAN2: chassis fan 2

I get confused because the case's manual specify that all the case's
fans should be connected to a centralized power controlled by a fan
speed button which is part of the case with no communication with the
mobo.

That's because the case mfr (TT) want's to push their "feature". It's
not necessary. "Enthusiast" cases have lots of these things.

If you use the mobo connectors instead, you don't get to use "their'
feature (the fan-speed controller). No biggie, either method works fine.
If you later choose to use the controller (noise special cooling needs,
etc, it's easy to change to their system.

The main advantage with using the mobo connectors is that you can have
BIOS warn you if a fan stalls. I don't think TT's system does that.
I suppose that I can use the CHA_FAN1 and CHA_FAN2 to connect 2 of the
5 fans provided with the Thermaltake Element V case so I can monitor
the fan speeds.

This sounds like a good balance. Keep the "more critical" fans on the
mobo connectors, and put the others on the TT controller.
* But should I really do this ?

It's really just a choice. Both systems (or a mix) should work, but
(like any new build or major upgrade) you have to do monitoring of all
critical temps to see if it works well.
* Does the mobo provide enough powers for the big fans ?
Yes.

Thanks in advance for helping me.


--
"Shit this is it, all the pieces do fit.
We're like that crazy old man jumping
out of the alleyway with a baseball bat,
saying, "Remember me motherfucker?"
Jim “Dandy” Mangrum
 
P

Paul

Castor said:
Hi all,

I am going to order the Thermaltake Element V for my new Asus mobo:

http://www.thermaltakeusa.com/Product.aspx?C=1420&ID=1900#Tab0

My new mobo will be the Asus M4A89TD PRO USB3:

http://www.asus.com/Motherboards/AMD_AM3/M4A89TD_PROUSB3

The mobo manual specify the following fans' connectors:

CPU_FAN: CPU fan connector
PWR_FAN: PSU fan connector
CHA_FAN1: chassis fan 1
CHA_FAN2: chassis fan 2

I get confused because the case's manual specify that all the case's
fans should be connected to a centralized power controlled by a fan
speed button which is part of the case with no communication with the
mobo.

I suppose that I can use the CHA_FAN1 and CHA_FAN2 to connect 2 of the
5 fans provided with the Thermaltake Element V case so I can monitor
the fan speeds.

* But should I really do this ?
* Does the mobo provide enough powers for the big fans ?

Thanks in advance for helping me.

http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/Thermaltake/Element_V/images/instmb.jpg

It looks like there is a Molex power connector, for running the adjustable
fan speed knob at the top front of the case. Running it the way Thermaltake
intended, ensures no damage to the motherboard by the fan loading.

Whether the fans can be run directly from the motherboard, would depend on
whether there is the proper three hole connector on the end of each fan cable.

On some of the older Asus motherboards, the manual gave a rating for the
fan headers, in terms of amperes of current, but the statements never made
a lot of sense to me. The 12V distribution to the fans, is not protected
by a fuse, so if you draw too much current, and the copper track cannot
handle it, the track will burn out. I would think somewhere around 2 amps
total for that track, is a typical limit. And perhaps 350mA per header
or so.

The Thermaltake case has a couple 200mm fans, so those probably
draw a bit more current than a regular fan. I would check the current
rating printed on the hub of the fan. I have one case fan here, which
draws 1 ampere, and I would not connect that to a motherboard header.

Whether it is worthwhile connecting the fans to the motherboard,
would depend on whether the fans are "three wire" and one of the wires
is the RPM signal. Without an RPM signal, there is no point connecting
the fan to the motherboard, as you can't monitor it. And Asus is typically
not that generous with voltage-based fan adjustments, so you don't find
any speed adjustment in the BIOS for all fan headers. The CPU fan header
naturally supports speed control (four hole fan connector) by virtue of
AMD and Intel's input in the matter. So you're likely to find a PWM controlled
fan header for the CPU, which can be adjusted. But for the other headers,
they're less likely to be adjustable.

I notice that CHA_FAN1 has a four pin PWM based connector, so speed control is
available and is similar to CPU fan speed control. But PWM controlled fans aren't
that common. The Thermaltake case probably doesn't have four wire fans with
a small four hole connector on the end. Most computer cases have three wire
(or two wire) fans, and lack a fourth (PWM) wire.

The solution provided by Thermaltake, means less messy wiring running
around the case, and I would use it in this situation. You will still be
able to monitor the CPU fan speed, as the CPU fan is independent of the
computer case wiring.

Paul
 
C

Castor Nageur

If you use the mobo connectors instead, you don't get to use "their'
feature (the fan-speed controller). No biggie, either method works fine.
If you later choose to use the controller (noise special cooling needs,
etc, it's easy to change to their system.

OK, so I have the choice of manually setting the fans' speed with the
case's potentiometer or let the mobo adjusting the speed (of 2 of my
fans) using the measured temps feedback.
The main advantage with using the mobo connectors is that you can have
BIOS warn you if a fan stalls. I don't think TT's system does that.

OK, the most important temp is the CPU which is always managed by the
mobo (the video card generally has its own cooling system). I think if
the CPU is correctly cooled, I should not have any warns from the
case.
This sounds like a good balance. Keep the "more critical" fans on the
mobo connectors, and put the others on the TT controller.

OK, I am going to think of this. I am afraid like Paul suggested that
the big 20cm fans ask too much power so it can damage the mobo : I am
going to look for the fans' power specs.

Thanks for your help.
 
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C

Castor Nageur

The 12V distribution to the fans, is not protected
by a fuse, so if you draw too much current, and the copper track cannot
handle it, the track will burn out.
The Thermaltake case has a couple 200mm fans, so those probably
draw a bit more current than a regular fan.

I will not take the risk to burn a brand new expensive motherboard.
Most computer cases have three wire (or two wire) fans, and lack a fourth (PWM) wire.

Good argument.
The solution provided by Thermaltake, means less messy wiring running
around the case, and I would use it in this situation. You will still be
able to monitor the CPU fan speed, as the CPU fan is independent of the
computer case wiring.

Absolutely, to me, the CPU temp is the most important. Moreover, I
suppose the mobo has a temp sensor built-in the motherboard (I did not
check this yet) so I have a good idea of the temp and can get some
warnings from it.
Consequently, I will use the Thermaltake solution and my mobo will
warn me if something is going wrong.

Thanks for your help.
 

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