ADODB on dotnet.


M

Mr. X.

Hello.

In earlier applications I did :
Dim conn As Adodb.connetion

.... in order to declare a connection string (rest is known).



When I am using dotnet (In VISUAL STUDIO 2008),

The above isn't compiled.

On the aspx page :

....

<

<%@ Page Language="vb" AutoEventWireup="false" CodeBehind="Default.aspx.vb"
Inherits="WebApplication1._Default" %>



in Default.aspx.vb :

==============

Partial Public Class _Default

Inherits System.Web.UI.Page

Dim conn As Adodb.connetion

Protected Sub LoginButton_Click(ByVal sender As Object, ByVal e As
EventArgs)

End Sub

End Class



"Dim conn As Adodb.connetion" is not the correct syntax.

What is the correct syntax ?

Is there any other way to do connection to database (fits to sql-server
2008) ?

Thanks :)
 
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M

Mr. X.

Found.

(Right click on project name + add reference + ADO)

It's a question for newbie user of Microsoft Visual Studio 2008.
(Still looking for good tutorial for M VS.2008).

Thanks anyway :)
 
K

kimiraikkonen

How can I set a reference to the library ?

Thanks :)

In Solution Explorer, right click on your project -> "Add Reference"
then choose necessary tab, in this case, from .NET tab, choose
System.Data.dll.

Hope this helps,

Onur Güzel
 
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M

Michel Posseth [MCP]

Mr X

It is clear to me that you use classic ADODB syntax while in the .Net world
we use ADO.Net

Please read a bit about the subject ADO.Net as the next thing you are going
to miss is the recordset object
now in ADO.Net we have Datasets wich can exist out of one or more DataTables
a Datatables is the modern vaiant of of recordset object
a DataTable exists out of DataRows wich in its turn exists out of
DataColumns .


Also note the Disconnected aproach of ADO.Net ,,, VS the choices you had to
choose at ADODB,,, a datareader ( the thingy that fills the dataset in
ADO.Net )
is simular to a firehose cursor in classic ADO etc etc etc etc etc etc .


I would recomend you to read a good ADO.Net Book

http://astore.amazon.com/vbdotnetcoder-20?_encoding=UTF8&node=9

Michel Posseth [MCP]
http://www.vbdotnetcoder.com
 
C

Cor Ligthert[MVP]

Hi,


Dim myConnection As New ADODB.Connection
MyConnection.ConnectionString = "Provider='sqloledb';Data
Source='MySqlServer';" & _
"Initial Catalog='Pubs';Integrated Security='SSPI';"


Cor
 
M

Michel Posseth [MCP]

Mr. X.

What i am still curious about is the following

I see all these people here giving you answers how to use "Classic" ADODB in
..Net 2008 ( wich i would sure not recomend you to do unless you have a
verry good reasson to do so

Are you aware of the fact that ADO.Net should be prefered in .Net ?

regards

Michel
 
M

Mr. X.

Hello.
If ADO.NET is better choice for modern programming,
so I shall use it.

There is also application-box - is it related to ADO.NET.

What classic thing to do is :
using adodb.connection, and open it with a connectionString.
set a recordset by some pure sql : ado.recordSet rs =
connection.ExecuteQuery( sql ...)
do some rs.getNext until rs.eof.
close rs and connection.

What may be difference between ADO.NET & ADO ?
What are the stages of ADO.NET ?

No need much answer,
because I just got confused from VS 2008, and need some practice on it.
Problem has been solved since I add reference to ADO.

Thanks :)
 
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C

Cor Ligthert[MVP]

Because probably noboby including me, wants to answer again on that dead
horse again

As it is a question about AdoDB then you don't by instance know if this is
related with Sharepoint, where was AFAIK a time written by some people like
the about the dispose method.

"It is best practise to use ADODB". About the Dispose this is changed on the
official MSDN pages, I am not aware about the status with AdoDB.

Cor
 
M

Michel Posseth [MCP]

Huh ???
Because probably noboby including me, wants to answer again on that dead
horse again

And then you start giving wrong answers ? , and i was having the impression
that his question was misunderstood by the rest of the thread answerers
that is why i gave this thread a new push with my question
As it is a question about AdoDB then you don't by instance know if this is
related with Sharepoint, where was AFAIK a time written by some people
like the about the dispose method.

"It is best practise to use ADODB". About the Dispose this is changed on
the official MSDN pages, I am not aware about the status with AdoDB.

Wel after rereading this several times , i am still not sure if i understand
you correct

but i give it a shot :
As it is a question about AdoDB then you don't by instance know if this is
related with Sharepoint,

I guess he should have posted his question then in one of the sharepoint
related groups or at least mention sharepoint or any other valid reasson for
using legacy ADODB in .Net
"It is best practise to use ADODB". About the Dispose this is changed on
the official MSDN pages, I am not aware about the status with AdoDB.

AFAIK : the prefered way in .Net languages to access data and data
services is ADO.Net and not ADODB
it as simple as ADO.Net = .Net and ADODB = legacy So if you program in
..Net wich one should be prefered ?

And Dispose why are you still talking about the Dispose thread ?
The book i quoted out was published in 2002 about the same time when VB.Net
was released to the public , so from my perspective the Dispose rule is as
old as .Net is out there .




Michel Posseth [MCP]
http://www.vbdotnetcoder.com
 
M

Michel Posseth [MCP]

Hello Mr. X

ADO.Net is the bether choice for all .Net languages unless you have a valid
reasson to stick with ADO classic
i now for a fact that some programmers still use ADO classic just because
they use the ADOX features in there programs
however the same can be acomplished with ADO.Net and some DDL SQL .

here is a good ADO.Net reference

http://msdn.microsoft.com/nl-nl/data/aa937722(en-us).aspx
What classic thing to do is :
using adodb.connection, and open it with a connectionString.
set a recordset by some pure sql : ado.recordSet rs =
connection.ExecuteQuery( sql ...)
do some rs.getNext until rs.eof.
close rs and connection.

the ADO.Net equivalant would be something like this

Imports System.Data.SqlClient

Public Class Form1

Private Sub test()

Dim mySelectQuery As String = "SELECT OrderID, CustomerID FROM Orders"

'standard : Data Source=myServerAddress;Initial Catalog=myDataBase;User
Id=myUsername;Password=myPassword;

'Trusted : Data Source=myServerAddress;Initial Catalog=myDataBase;Integrated
Security=SSPI;

Using myConnection As New SqlConnection("Data Source=myServerAddress;Initial
Catalog=myDataBase;Integrated Security=SSPI;")

Dim myReader As SqlDataReader

Using myCommand As New SqlCommand(mySelectQuery, myConnection)

myConnection.Open()

myReader = myCommand.ExecuteReader()

End Using

' Always call Read before accessing data.

While myReader.Read()

Debug.WriteLine((myReader.GetInt32(0) & ", " & myReader.GetString(1)))

End While

' always call Close when done reading.

myReader.Close()

' Close the connection when done with it.

myConnection.Close()

End Using

End Sub

End Class


What may be difference between ADO.NET & ADO ?
What are the stages of ADO.NET ?

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/904fck4k(VS.80).aspx

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ADO_vs_ADO.NET


I recomend you to read in on the subject it is not so hard , buy yourself
some good MS PRESS books


regards

Michel Posseth [MCP]
http://www.vbdotnetcoder.com
 
C

Cor Ligthert[MVP]

Michel,

First: I agree that my previous message had a lot of grammatical failures. I
corrected it to quick, while in fact I had no time at that moment (like in
fact now).

Second: As advice, buy a new book, books from 2002 where based on Beta
2002 VB, while even the not Beta VB 2002 was very bad.
In that time is often used the sentence "It is best practise
..........................", simple because the mostly VB6 writers who were
converting there books did not understand things yet. This sentence exist as
well for AdoDB, however probably that is from before the .Net time and meant
that AdoDB was better than DOA. Those best practise sentences seem to have
mostly almost an endless life.

Thirth: although I never use it, can AdoDB be a better choise to use for
application made solely for stand alone, by instance games, simply because
in those cases AdoDB is much quicker (DAO is even quicker but that is not
supported anymore).

Fourth: AdoDb has still to be supported for a while, because it is still in
Visual Studio .Net 2008, because AdoDB is used by converting VB6 programs.

Cor


Michel Posseth said:
Huh ???
Because probably noboby including me, wants to answer again on that dead
horse again

And then you start giving wrong answers ? , and i was having the
impression that his question was misunderstood by the rest of the thread
answerers
that is why i gave this thread a new push with my question
As it is a question about AdoDB then you don't by instance know if this
is related with Sharepoint, where was AFAIK a time written by some
people like the about the dispose method.

"It is best practise to use ADODB". About the Dispose this is changed on
the official MSDN pages, I am not aware about the status with AdoDB.

Wel after rereading this several times , i am still not sure if i
understand you correct

but i give it a shot :
As it is a question about AdoDB then you don't by instance know if this is
related with Sharepoint,

I guess he should have posted his question then in one of the sharepoint
related groups or at least mention sharepoint or any other valid reasson
for using legacy ADODB in .Net
"It is best practise to use ADODB". About the Dispose this is changed on
the official MSDN pages, I am not aware about the status with AdoDB.

AFAIK : the prefered way in .Net languages to access data and data
services is ADO.Net and not ADODB
it as simple as ADO.Net = .Net and ADODB = legacy So if you program in
.Net wich one should be prefered ?

And Dispose why are you still talking about the Dispose thread ?
The book i quoted out was published in 2002 about the same time when
VB.Net was released to the public , so from my perspective the Dispose
rule is as old as .Net is out there .




Michel Posseth [MCP]
http://www.vbdotnetcoder.com







Cor Ligthert said:
Because probably noboby including me, wants to answer again on that dead
horse again

As it is a question about AdoDB then you don't by instance know if this
is related with Sharepoint, where was AFAIK a time written by some
people like the about the dispose method.

"It is best practise to use ADODB". About the Dispose this is changed on
the official MSDN pages, I am not aware about the status with AdoDB.

Cor
 
M

Michel Posseth [MCP]

Cor ,
Second: As advice, buy a new book, books from 2002 where based on Beta
2002 VB, while even the not Beta VB 2002 was very bad.
In that time is often used the sentence "It is best practise
.........................", simple because the mostly VB6 writers who were
converting there books did not understand things yet. This sentence exist
as well for AdoDB, however probably that is from before the .Net time and
meant that AdoDB was better than DOA. Those best practise sentences seem
to have mostly almost an endless life.

no no no no , the book i am talking about is the core reference guide , it
is even updated today ( downloadable from the writers website ) with new
insights etc etc etc there is also a revisited 2005 version same story there
..

so you are now telling me that all official MS Press books are wrong , that
the MSDN library is wrong ,that our peers who agree are wriong , etc etc
etc you are kidding me are you ? , There is nothing beta or even
misinformation in the core reference guides you are talking about the
"Introducing " series of MS press wich this book is obviously not MS Press
has "Introducing" , "Step by Step", "Core Reference" , and "Advanced
Topics"

I only quote from Core Reference and Advanced Topics versions of the MS
press Books they are not based on beta`s and for a fact verry wel written i
can indeed not say the same for the "Introducing" and "Step by Step"Books
although they serve there purpose i comonly find flaws in them .

For the rest of your dialogue , this is really beating death horses ,talk
facts,,, simple question do you believe that it is completely normall to do
standard database stuff with ADODB in a brand new VB.net 2008 application
?? i don`t think so ,, so i guess we are on the same line again .

Cause that is where this thread was all about , not that it can and could or
whatever,,,,,, ofcourse this is a famous thing for Dutch people talking
everything straight that is bended as a curve ,,, telling a person that
black is actually white with some other color variations added to it

Not so verry long ago i was even atacked in this group by people who think
it is common practice to use DAO in brand new VB.Net apps so the long story
made short is ( i have to go to work now ) "Just because you can" ,
"doesn`t mean you should" .

regards

Michel Posseth



Cor Ligthert said:
Michel,

First: I agree that my previous message had a lot of grammatical failures.
I corrected it to quick, while in fact I had no time at that moment (like
in fact now).

Second: As advice, buy a new book, books from 2002 where based on Beta
2002 VB, while even the not Beta VB 2002 was very bad.
In that time is often used the sentence "It is best practise
.........................", simple because the mostly VB6 writers who were
converting there books did not understand things yet. This sentence exist
as well for AdoDB, however probably that is from before the .Net time and
meant that AdoDB was better than DOA. Those best practise sentences seem
to have mostly almost an endless life.

Thirth: although I never use it, can AdoDB be a better choise to use for
application made solely for stand alone, by instance games, simply because
in those cases AdoDB is much quicker (DAO is even quicker but that is not
supported anymore).

Fourth: AdoDb has still to be supported for a while, because it is still
in Visual Studio .Net 2008, because AdoDB is used by converting VB6
programs.

Cor


Michel Posseth said:
Huh ???
Because probably noboby including me, wants to answer again on that dead
horse again

And then you start giving wrong answers ? , and i was having the
impression that his question was misunderstood by the rest of the thread
answerers
that is why i gave this thread a new push with my question
As it is a question about AdoDB then you don't by instance know if this
is related with Sharepoint, where was AFAIK a time written by some
people like the about the dispose method.

"It is best practise to use ADODB". About the Dispose this is changed on
the official MSDN pages, I am not aware about the status with AdoDB.

Wel after rereading this several times , i am still not sure if i
understand you correct

but i give it a shot :
As it is a question about AdoDB then you don't by instance know if this
is related with Sharepoint,

I guess he should have posted his question then in one of the sharepoint
related groups or at least mention sharepoint or any other valid reasson
for using legacy ADODB in .Net
"It is best practise to use ADODB". About the Dispose this is changed on
the official MSDN pages, I am not aware about the status with AdoDB.

AFAIK : the prefered way in .Net languages to access data and data
services is ADO.Net and not ADODB
it as simple as ADO.Net = .Net and ADODB = legacy So if you program
in .Net wich one should be prefered ?

And Dispose why are you still talking about the Dispose thread ?
The book i quoted out was published in 2002 about the same time when
VB.Net was released to the public , so from my perspective the Dispose
rule is as old as .Net is out there .




Michel Posseth [MCP]
http://www.vbdotnetcoder.com







Cor Ligthert said:
Because probably noboby including me, wants to answer again on that dead
horse again

As it is a question about AdoDB then you don't by instance know if this
is related with Sharepoint, where was AFAIK a time written by some
people like the about the dispose method.

"It is best practise to use ADODB". About the Dispose this is changed on
the official MSDN pages, I am not aware about the status with AdoDB.

Cor


Mr. X.

What i am still curious about is the following

I see all these people here giving you answers how to use "Classic"
ADODB in .Net 2008 ( wich i would sure not recomend you to do unless
you have a verry good reasson to do so

Are you aware of the fact that ADO.Net should be prefered in .Net ?

regards

Michel



"Mr. X." <[email protected]_please.com> schreef in bericht
Hello.

In earlier applications I did :
Dim conn As Adodb.connetion

... in order to declare a connection string (rest is known).



When I am using dotnet (In VISUAL STUDIO 2008),

The above isn't compiled.

On the aspx page :

...

<

<%@ Page Language="vb" AutoEventWireup="false"
CodeBehind="Default.aspx.vb" Inherits="WebApplication1._Default" %>



in Default.aspx.vb :

==============

Partial Public Class _Default

Inherits System.Web.UI.Page

Dim conn As Adodb.connetion

Protected Sub LoginButton_Click(ByVal sender As Object, ByVal e As
EventArgs)

End Sub

End Class



"Dim conn As Adodb.connetion" is not the correct syntax.

What is the correct syntax ?

Is there any other way to do connection to database (fits to
sql-server 2008) ?

Thanks :)
 
Ad

Advertisements

C

Cor Ligthert[MVP]

Michel,

I stop this discussion, mostly we agree and I don't want to disturb that by
this kind childness discussions (for sure by me).

However, as advice don't write this, "ofcourse this is a famous thing for
Dutch people talking everything straight that is bended as a curve "

Not everybody on Internet knows that you are as well Dutch so it can be seen
as discriminating (or whatever) Dutch people, beside that, I have more than
often showed in the newsgroups that my behaviour is oposite from that.

-:)

Cor
regards

Michel Posseth



Cor Ligthert said:
Michel,

First: I agree that my previous message had a lot of grammatical
failures. I corrected it to quick, while in fact I had no time at that
moment (like in fact now).

Second: As advice, buy a new book, books from 2002 where based on Beta
2002 VB, while even the not Beta VB 2002 was very bad.
In that time is often used the sentence "It is best practise
.........................", simple because the mostly VB6 writers who
were converting there books did not understand things yet. This sentence
exist as well for AdoDB, however probably that is from before the .Net
time and meant that AdoDB was better than DOA. Those best practise
sentences seem to have mostly almost an endless life.

Thirth: although I never use it, can AdoDB be a better choise to use for
application made solely for stand alone, by instance games, simply
because in those cases AdoDB is much quicker (DAO is even quicker but
that is not supported anymore).

Fourth: AdoDb has still to be supported for a while, because it is still
in Visual Studio .Net 2008, because AdoDB is used by converting VB6
programs.

Cor


Michel Posseth said:
Huh ???

Because probably noboby including me, wants to answer again on that
dead horse again

And then you start giving wrong answers ? , and i was having the
impression that his question was misunderstood by the rest of the
thread answerers
that is why i gave this thread a new push with my question

As it is a question about AdoDB then you don't by instance know if this
is related with Sharepoint, where was AFAIK a time written by some
people like the about the dispose method.

"It is best practise to use ADODB". About the Dispose this is changed
on the official MSDN pages, I am not aware about the status with AdoDB.


Wel after rereading this several times , i am still not sure if i
understand you correct

but i give it a shot :

As it is a question about AdoDB then you don't by instance know if this
is related with Sharepoint,

I guess he should have posted his question then in one of the sharepoint
related groups or at least mention sharepoint or any other valid reasson
for using legacy ADODB in .Net

"It is best practise to use ADODB". About the Dispose this is changed on
the official MSDN pages, I am not aware about the status with AdoDB.

AFAIK : the prefered way in .Net languages to access data and data
services is ADO.Net and not ADODB
it as simple as ADO.Net = .Net and ADODB = legacy So if you program
in .Net wich one should be prefered ?

And Dispose why are you still talking about the Dispose thread ?
The book i quoted out was published in 2002 about the same time when
VB.Net was released to the public , so from my perspective the Dispose
rule is as old as .Net is out there .




Michel Posseth [MCP]
http://www.vbdotnetcoder.com







"Cor Ligthert[MVP]" <[email protected]> schreef in bericht
Because probably noboby including me, wants to answer again on that
dead horse again

As it is a question about AdoDB then you don't by instance know if this
is related with Sharepoint, where was AFAIK a time written by some
people like the about the dispose method.

"It is best practise to use ADODB". About the Dispose this is changed
on the official MSDN pages, I am not aware about the status with AdoDB.

Cor


Mr. X.

What i am still curious about is the following

I see all these people here giving you answers how to use "Classic"
ADODB in .Net 2008 ( wich i would sure not recomend you to do unless
you have a verry good reasson to do so

Are you aware of the fact that ADO.Net should be prefered in .Net ?

regards

Michel



"Mr. X." <[email protected]_please.com> schreef in bericht
Hello.

In earlier applications I did :
Dim conn As Adodb.connetion

... in order to declare a connection string (rest is known).



When I am using dotnet (In VISUAL STUDIO 2008),

The above isn't compiled.

On the aspx page :

...

<

<%@ Page Language="vb" AutoEventWireup="false"
CodeBehind="Default.aspx.vb" Inherits="WebApplication1._Default" %>



in Default.aspx.vb :

==============

Partial Public Class _Default

Inherits System.Web.UI.Page

Dim conn As Adodb.connetion

Protected Sub LoginButton_Click(ByVal sender As Object, ByVal e As
EventArgs)

End Sub

End Class



"Dim conn As Adodb.connetion" is not the correct syntax.

What is the correct syntax ?

Is there any other way to do connection to database (fits to
sql-server 2008) ?

Thanks :)
 
Ad

Advertisements

M

Michel Posseth [MCP]

Cor ,

"We all come in different SHAPES and SIZES.
We all have STRENGTHS and weaknesses.

What's right for one person may not be right for another.
There are things that are important to me, that you don't care about at
all!
And sometimes your behavior doesn't make any sense to me.

But I want for us to understand each other, and communicate well,
because we live together in the same world.

I know I can't expect you to want the same things that I want.
We are not the same person, so we will not always see things the same way.

I have my own Thoughts and my own Ideas,
that may or may not fit into your vision of who I should be. "

Above is copied and pasted from a personalitypage but it reflects my
feelings regarding discussions like this
i believe that with a litle inmagination to reflect it on this group it
says it all .



Regards
Michel Posseth [MCP]
http://www.vbdotnetcoder.com




Cor Ligthert said:
Michel,

I stop this discussion, mostly we agree and I don't want to disturb that
by this kind childness discussions (for sure by me).

However, as advice don't write this, "ofcourse this is a famous thing for
Dutch people talking everything straight that is bended as a curve "

Not everybody on Internet knows that you are as well Dutch so it can be
seen as discriminating (or whatever) Dutch people, beside that, I have
more than often showed in the newsgroups that my behaviour is oposite from
that.

-:)

Cor
regards

Michel Posseth



Cor Ligthert said:
Michel,

First: I agree that my previous message had a lot of grammatical
failures. I corrected it to quick, while in fact I had no time at that
moment (like in fact now).

Second: As advice, buy a new book, books from 2002 where based on Beta
2002 VB, while even the not Beta VB 2002 was very bad.
In that time is often used the sentence "It is best practise
.........................", simple because the mostly VB6 writers who
were converting there books did not understand things yet. This sentence
exist as well for AdoDB, however probably that is from before the .Net
time and meant that AdoDB was better than DOA. Those best practise
sentences seem to have mostly almost an endless life.

Thirth: although I never use it, can AdoDB be a better choise to use
for application made solely for stand alone, by instance games, simply
because in those cases AdoDB is much quicker (DAO is even quicker but
that is not supported anymore).

Fourth: AdoDb has still to be supported for a while, because it is still
in Visual Studio .Net 2008, because AdoDB is used by converting VB6
programs.

Cor


Huh ???

Because probably noboby including me, wants to answer again on that
dead horse again

And then you start giving wrong answers ? , and i was having the
impression that his question was misunderstood by the rest of the
thread answerers
that is why i gave this thread a new push with my question

As it is a question about AdoDB then you don't by instance know if
this is related with Sharepoint, where was AFAIK a time written by
some people like the about the dispose method.

"It is best practise to use ADODB". About the Dispose this is changed
on the official MSDN pages, I am not aware about the status with
AdoDB.


Wel after rereading this several times , i am still not sure if i
understand you correct

but i give it a shot :

As it is a question about AdoDB then you don't by instance know if this
is related with Sharepoint,

I guess he should have posted his question then in one of the
sharepoint related groups or at least mention sharepoint or any other
valid reasson for using legacy ADODB in .Net

"It is best practise to use ADODB". About the Dispose this is changed
on the official MSDN pages, I am not aware about the status with AdoDB.

AFAIK : the prefered way in .Net languages to access data and data
services is ADO.Net and not ADODB
it as simple as ADO.Net = .Net and ADODB = legacy So if you program
in .Net wich one should be prefered ?

And Dispose why are you still talking about the Dispose thread ?
The book i quoted out was published in 2002 about the same time when
VB.Net was released to the public , so from my perspective the Dispose
rule is as old as .Net is out there .




Michel Posseth [MCP]
http://www.vbdotnetcoder.com







"Cor Ligthert[MVP]" <[email protected]> schreef in bericht
Because probably noboby including me, wants to answer again on that
dead horse again

As it is a question about AdoDB then you don't by instance know if
this is related with Sharepoint, where was AFAIK a time written by
some people like the about the dispose method.

"It is best practise to use ADODB". About the Dispose this is changed
on the official MSDN pages, I am not aware about the status with
AdoDB.

Cor


Mr. X.

What i am still curious about is the following

I see all these people here giving you answers how to use "Classic"
ADODB in .Net 2008 ( wich i would sure not recomend you to do
unless you have a verry good reasson to do so

Are you aware of the fact that ADO.Net should be prefered in .Net ?

regards

Michel



"Mr. X." <[email protected]_please.com> schreef in bericht
Hello.

In earlier applications I did :
Dim conn As Adodb.connetion

... in order to declare a connection string (rest is known).



When I am using dotnet (In VISUAL STUDIO 2008),

The above isn't compiled.

On the aspx page :

...

<

<%@ Page Language="vb" AutoEventWireup="false"
CodeBehind="Default.aspx.vb" Inherits="WebApplication1._Default" %>



in Default.aspx.vb :

==============

Partial Public Class _Default

Inherits System.Web.UI.Page

Dim conn As Adodb.connetion

Protected Sub LoginButton_Click(ByVal sender As Object, ByVal e As
EventArgs)

End Sub

End Class



"Dim conn As Adodb.connetion" is not the correct syntax.

What is the correct syntax ?

Is there any other way to do connection to database (fits to
sql-server 2008) ?

Thanks :)
 

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