how do i type isotopes in Word 2007?

Discussion in 'Microsoft Word Document Management' started by H Newsholme, Nov 16, 2008.

  1. H Newsholme

    H Newsholme Guest

    Please could someone tell me how to type isotopes in Word 2007
    many thanks
     
    H Newsholme, Nov 16, 2008
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. H Newsholme

    JoAnn Paules Guest

    Use superscrpt numbers or visit: http://www.albuquerquebaseball.com/

    --

    JoAnn Paules
    MVP Microsoft [Publisher]
    Tech Editor for "Microsoft Publisher 2007 For Dummies"



    "H Newsholme" <H > wrote in message
    news:...
    > Please could someone tell me how to type isotopes in Word 2007
    > many thanks
    >
     
    JoAnn Paules, Nov 16, 2008
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. H Newsholme

    Jay Freedman Guest

    On Sun, 16 Nov 2008 09:46:04 -0800, H Newsholme <H
    > wrote:

    >Please could someone tell me how to type isotopes in Word 2007
    >many thanks


    There are several ways.

    Probably the easiest is to use the new equation editor. Press Alt+= to open an
    editor box -- this can be in a new paragraph or inside regular text -- and also
    to display the Equation Tools ribbon. In the Structures group on the ribbon,
    click Script and choose the picture that has boxes for superscript and subscript
    to the left of the main box. Type the atomic mass in the superscript
    placeholder, the atomic number in the subscript, and the element symbol in the
    main box. Because the editor assumes the main box is a math variable, you have
    to select it and press Ctrl+I to turn off the italics.

    The one drawback of the new editor is that it can only use one font, Cambria
    Math. That may change in the future.

    Another way is to use the EQ field with the \a switch, which is mean for making
    arrays. Press Ctrl+F9 to insert field braces. Inside the braces, type

    eq \a \ar (A,N)

    but replace A with the atomic mass and N with the atomic number. Format the
    whole thing in a smaller font size -- for example, 8 pt to go with 12 pt regular
    text. Press F9 to update the field. Then type the element symbol to the right of
    the numbers.

    A third way, similar to the first, is to use the same Microsoft Equation 3.0
    that was available in previous versions. Click Insert > Object > Create New >
    Microsoft Equation 3.0. (If that choice isn't in the list, you'll have to go
    through the Office installer, choose "Add or Remove Features", and choose
    Equation Editor under Office Tools.) On the editor's toolbar, click the
    superscript/subscript group and choose the layout with superscript and subscript
    to the left of the main box. To remove the italics on the element symbol, click
    the Style menu and choose Text.

    After using any of these methods, it would be a good idea to select the whole
    thing and make an AutoCorrect entry of it so you can quickly use it again.

    --
    Regards,
    Jay Freedman
    Microsoft Word MVP FAQ: http://word.mvps.org
    Email cannot be acknowledged; please post all follow-ups to the newsgroup so all may benefit.
     
    Jay Freedman, Nov 16, 2008
    #3
  4. H Newsholme

    H Newsholme Guest

    many thanks for your help
    H Newsholme

    "JoAnn Paules" wrote:

    > Use superscrpt numbers or visit: http://www.albuquerquebaseball.com/
    >
    > --
    >
    > JoAnn Paules
    > MVP Microsoft [Publisher]
    > Tech Editor for "Microsoft Publisher 2007 For Dummies"
    >
    >
    >
    > "H Newsholme" <H > wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Please could someone tell me how to type isotopes in Word 2007
    > > many thanks
    > >

    >
    >
     
    H Newsholme, Nov 16, 2008
    #4
  5. H Newsholme

    H Newsholme Guest

    Many thanks for your help. I will try the methods explained.
    best wishes
    Heather Newsholme

    "Jay Freedman" wrote:

    > On Sun, 16 Nov 2008 09:46:04 -0800, H Newsholme <H
    > > wrote:
    >
    > >Please could someone tell me how to type isotopes in Word 2007
    > >many thanks

    >
    > There are several ways.
    >
    > Probably the easiest is to use the new equation editor. Press Alt+= to open an
    > editor box -- this can be in a new paragraph or inside regular text -- and also
    > to display the Equation Tools ribbon. In the Structures group on the ribbon,
    > click Script and choose the picture that has boxes for superscript and subscript
    > to the left of the main box. Type the atomic mass in the superscript
    > placeholder, the atomic number in the subscript, and the element symbol in the
    > main box. Because the editor assumes the main box is a math variable, you have
    > to select it and press Ctrl+I to turn off the italics.
    >
    > The one drawback of the new editor is that it can only use one font, Cambria
    > Math. That may change in the future.
    >
    > Another way is to use the EQ field with the \a switch, which is mean for making
    > arrays. Press Ctrl+F9 to insert field braces. Inside the braces, type
    >
    > eq \a \ar (A,N)
    >
    > but replace A with the atomic mass and N with the atomic number. Format the
    > whole thing in a smaller font size -- for example, 8 pt to go with 12 pt regular
    > text. Press F9 to update the field. Then type the element symbol to the right of
    > the numbers.
    >
    > A third way, similar to the first, is to use the same Microsoft Equation 3.0
    > that was available in previous versions. Click Insert > Object > Create New >
    > Microsoft Equation 3.0. (If that choice isn't in the list, you'll have to go
    > through the Office installer, choose "Add or Remove Features", and choose
    > Equation Editor under Office Tools.) On the editor's toolbar, click the
    > superscript/subscript group and choose the layout with superscript and subscript
    > to the left of the main box. To remove the italics on the element symbol, click
    > the Style menu and choose Text.
    >
    > After using any of these methods, it would be a good idea to select the whole
    > thing and make an AutoCorrect entry of it so you can quickly use it again.
    >
    > --
    > Regards,
    > Jay Freedman
    > Microsoft Word MVP FAQ: http://word.mvps.org
    > Email cannot be acknowledged; please post all follow-ups to the newsgroup so all may benefit.
    >
     
    H Newsholme, Nov 16, 2008
    #5
  6. H Newsholme

    OfficeJunk

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2012
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Left subscript, superscript, isotopes, chemistry, word 2007
    This question was hard to me for a while. But as always for hard questions easy anwsers.
    So I use equation editor for this (pressing LeftALT and = together), then in formula bar write "(^233_98)U" without quotes then press space and watch :)
     
    OfficeJunk, Apr 7, 2012
    #6
    1. Advertisements

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Guest

    how do i open word docs created in 2007 beta with word 2007?

    Guest, Feb 22, 2007, in forum: Microsoft Word Document Management
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    278
    Guest
    Feb 22, 2007
  2. jasonfahy

    Formatting isotopes in Word

    jasonfahy, Jan 2, 2008, in forum: Microsoft Word Document Management
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    300
    jasonfahy
    Jan 3, 2008
  3. BCP

    Clicking .doc file in explorer opens Word 2007 not word 2007

    BCP, Oct 20, 2008, in forum: Microsoft Word Document Management
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    427
  4. Robert T

    Feature different in Word 2007 Standard and Word 2007 Home and Stu

    Robert T, Oct 24, 2008, in forum: Microsoft Word Document Management
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    186
    grammatim
    Oct 24, 2008
  5. Dale H.

    In Word 2003, I type @, but “ appears. I type *, but ( appears.

    Dale H., Oct 4, 2009, in forum: Microsoft Word Document Management
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    1,100
    Dale H.
    Oct 4, 2009
Loading...

Share This Page