Investigatory Powers Bill will become law


Becky

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The UK Government has passed the Investigatory Powers Bill, and it just awaits Royal Assent before becoming law. The new law, also known as the 'Snoopers Charter' forces internet service providers to keep browsing records for each internet user, and permits the Police / intelligence agencies to hack computers and other devices in certain circumstances.

Despite criticism from almost every major technology and internet company – including usually reticent ones like Apple – and from senior parliamentary committees the legislation has received little opposition in parliament. Early on, the only amendment that the bill received from MPs was a measure that stopped themselves being spied on, and while Labour has raised objections to the sweeping spying powers it has not voted against the bill.

Those opposing the bill argue that it has been hastily written and is being pushed through parliament too quickly to ensure that it doesn't receive full scrutiny. That has led to the bill including measures that are still undefined and so could be used by the government to force companies to do almost anything, tech firms have argued.


Read the full article here: The Independent
 
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nivrip

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More erosion of freedom. :(

But, maybe we have to have this sort of thing with all the potential terrorism going on around us. If it prevents just one terrorist attack then I will feel happy.

I certainly have nothing to hide. :)
 
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nivrip

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Speaking of Trojan Horses..........................


Trojan.JPG






:D
 

Becky

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I don't feel that I have anything to hide either, but that is a lot of data and if the government gains open access to it then that would be quite concerning. Particularly from a social engineering perspective. Also I read that they amended the bill so that MPs couldn't be spied on... :mad:
 

nivrip

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Also I read that they amended the bill so that MPs couldn't be spied on... :mad:

That's an absolute disgrace. :mad: Why should they be any different to anyone else?

It doesn't do anything for MP's image.
 

Becky

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That's an absolute disgrace. :mad: Why should they be any different to anyone else?

It doesn't do anything for MP's image.

Nothing different to normal I'm afraid. There are often special provisions in legislation for MPs etc, it's nothing new. I used to have to spend a lot of time reading through tax legislation and there are so many special provisions relating to MPs - notably when it comes to expenses :rolleyes:
 
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floppybootstomp

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The next thing is they will be monitoring out mobile and home telephone calls as well.

They already are.

Now we know why there have been so many cutbacks from the Government...... funding a multi-million strong army of snoopers don't come cheap ;)
 
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Land of the free and freedom of speech has just gone out the window then, perhaps it went out the window long ago, but now they are just letting us know officially.:mad::mad::cry::cry::cry:
 
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I don't feel that I have anything to hide either, but that is a lot of data and if the government gains open access to it then that would be quite concerning. Particularly from a social engineering perspective. Also I read that they amended the bill so that MPs couldn't be spied on... :mad:

MP's should in that respect have the no different treatment as the general public, as history has shown they are the same as the average person and can make stupid mistakes and personal decisions.
 
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Becky

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EU's highest court delivers blow to UK snooper's charter

“General and indiscriminate retention” of emails and electronic communications by governments is illegal, the EU’s highest court has ruled, in a judgment that could trigger challenges against the UK’s new Investigatory Powers Act – the so-called snooper’s charter.

Only targeted interception of traffic and location data in order to combat serious crime - including terrorism - is justified, according to a long-awaited decision by the European court of justice (ECJ) in Luxembourg.

:thumb:
 
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