NVIDIA announces Titan RTX graphics card

According to the company, the NVIDIA TITAN RTX is the "world’s most powerful desktop GPU"

By Becky Cunningham, last updated Dec 3, 2018.


  1. Becky
    NVIDIA have announced a new graphics card in their line up, and it's a beast; the NVIDIA Titan RTX, also known as the 'T-Rex'. NVIDIA teased an announcement yesterday on Twitter, and there was much suspicion that a new Titan card would be revealed.



    The card will be available in the US and Europe later this month, and will cost an eye-watering £2,399 ($2,499 USD). The GPU is powered by NVIDIA's Turing architecture, and has been designed to serve AI research, data science and creative applications. In terms of performance, NVIDIA has said that the card will deliver 130 teraflops of deep learning performance and 11 GigaRays of ray-tracing performance.

    titan rtx.jpg

    According to Jensen Huang, founder and CEO of NVIDIA, “Turing is NVIDIA’s biggest advance in a decade – fusing shaders, ray tracing, and deep learning to reinvent the GPU. The introduction of T-Rex puts Turing within reach of millions of the most demanding PC users — developers, scientists and content creators.”

    Check out the full specifications here:

    • 6 x graphics processing clusters
    • 36 x texture processing clusters
    • 72 x streaming multiprocessors
    • 4608 x CUDA cores (single precision)
    • 576 x Tensor cores
    • 72 x RT cores
    • 1350 MHz base clock
    • 1770 MHz boost clock
    • 7000 MHz memory clock
    • 14 Gbps memory data rate
    • Cache Size 6144 KL2
    • 24 GDDR6 total video memory
    • 384-bit memory interface
    • 672 GB/s total memory bandwidth
    • 510 GigaTexels/sec texture rate (Bilinear)
    • 12 nm FFN fabrication process
    • 18.6 Billion transistors
    • Connectors: 3 x Display Port, 1 x HDMI, 1 x USB Type-C
    • OS certification
    • Dual slot form factor
    • 2 x 8-pin powercConnectors
    • 650 Watts recommended power supply
    • 280 Watts thermal design power (TDP)1
    • 89°C thermal threshold
    You can read more about the card on NVIDIA's website here.