Upcoming Windows 7

Discussion in 'Microsoft Word New Users' started by Octavio, Sep 2, 2009.

  1. Octavio

    Octavio Guest

    When the new Windows 7 is expected to be on the retail stores for sale? Any
    idea of the retail prices?

    Will the Office Professional 2007 programs work well with it (I bet it will,
    since they are from the same company. Any anticipated problems? Slowness
    in old computers?)
     
    Octavio, Sep 2, 2009
    #1
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  2. Octavio

    JoAnn Paules Guest

    The first part of you question may be answered by searching Microsoft's
    website. Please note I said *may* and not *will*. All we can do is
    speculate.

    Second part: Almost certainly. As for anticipated problems, almost
    certainly.

    --

    JoAnn Paules
    MVP Microsoft [Publisher]
    Tech Editor for "Microsoft Publisher 2007 For Dummies"


    "Octavio" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > When the new Windows 7 is expected to be on the retail stores for sale?
    > Any
    > idea of the retail prices?
    >
    > Will the Office Professional 2007 programs work well with it (I bet it
    > will,
    > since they are from the same company. Any anticipated problems?
    > Slowness
    > in old computers?)
    >
    >
    >
     
    JoAnn Paules, Sep 2, 2009
    #2
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  3. Octavio

    Gordon Guest

    "Octavio" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    >
    > Will the Office Professional 2007 programs work well with it (I bet it
    > will,
    > since they are from the same company. Any anticipated problems?
    > Slowness
    > in old computers?)
    >
    >
    >


    No problems here so far - running on a Toshiba L40 Satellite with 2GB RAM
    and dual core 1.6 GHz processor...
     
    Gordon, Sep 2, 2009
    #3
  4. Octavio

    Jay Freedman Guest

    Octavio wrote:
    > When the new Windows 7 is expected to be on the retail stores for
    > sale? Any idea of the retail prices?


    A simple Google search for "windows 7 release date" gets the official answer
    at http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/products/home?os=nonwin7 --
    "Windows 7 will be available on October 22." That's the retail release date;
    people with MSDN or TechNet subscriptions can download it now.

    A link on that page leads to
    http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/products/compare-editions that
    shows estimated retail prices for three editions. Amazon.com shows the same
    prices at
    http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss?url=search-alias=aps&field-keywords=windows+7&x=0&y=0
    although you may find other prices elsewhere.

    > Will the Office Professional 2007 programs work well with it (I bet
    > it will, since they are from the same company. Any anticipated
    > problems? Slowness in old computers?)


    In my experience, both Office 2007 and Office 2003 work perfectly well on
    Windows 7, on both a 2-year-old desktop and a 4-year-old laptop. In fact, I
    think they work better on Windows 7 than they did on Windows Vista. But if
    your computer is old enough and slow enough, or has too little RAM, no
    version of Windows or Office is going to be satisfactory.

    --
    Regards,
    Jay Freedman
    Microsoft Word MVP FAQ: http://word.mvps.org
    Email cannot be acknowledged; please post all follow-ups to the newsgroup so
    all may benefit.
     
    Jay Freedman, Sep 2, 2009
    #4
  5. Octavio

    Daddy Guest

    For whatever it's worth: I have been using the 2007 versions of Word, Excel
    and Outlook on the Windows 7 Release Candidate without problems.

    Daddy

    "Octavio" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > When the new Windows 7 is expected to be on the retail stores for sale?
    > Any
    > idea of the retail prices?
    >
    > Will the Office Professional 2007 programs work well with it (I bet it
    > will,
    > since they are from the same company. Any anticipated problems?
    > Slowness
    > in old computers?)
    >
    >
    >
     
    Daddy, Sep 2, 2009
    #5
  6. I agree. I'm running Office 2007 in the RTM version of Windows 7, and it
    runs with fewer problems than it did under Vista--I haven't done speed
    tests, but it seems like it's faster under Windows 7, as well.

    --

    Herb Tyson MS MVP
    Author of the Word 2007 Bible
    Blog: http://word2007bible.herbtyson.com
    Web: http://www.herbtyson.com


    "Jay Freedman" <> wrote in message
    > In my experience, both Office 2007 and Office 2003 work perfectly well on
    > Windows 7, on both a 2-year-old desktop and a 4-year-old laptop. In fact,
    > I think they work better on Windows 7 than they did on Windows Vista. But
    > if your computer is old enough and slow enough, or has too little RAM, no
    > version of Windows or Office is going to be satisfactory.
     
    Herb Tyson [MVP], Sep 3, 2009
    #6
  7. Octavio

    jaws Guest

    Does Windows7 ALLOW you to use a default mail other than WindowsMail, as
    Vista forces? Still trying to believe not only did Vista force this, but
    gave no other options, and no work-arounds for it. As someone who's has had
    more than one computer crash, WHY would I want my mail to download on my
    computer, take up precious hard-drive space, AND be lost if computer were
    lost/stolen/broken????? ... I would love to meet the brilliant mind that
    came up with that ... and the brilliant one that decided customers would want
    no other options ... gotta love a mind-reader.

    "Octavio" wrote:

    > When the new Windows 7 is expected to be on the retail stores for sale? Any
    > idea of the retail prices?
    >
    > Will the Office Professional 2007 programs work well with it (I bet it will,
    > since they are from the same company. Any anticipated problems? Slowness
    > in old computers?)
    >
    >
    >
    >
     
    jaws, Sep 7, 2009
    #7
  8. Octavio

    Jay Freedman Guest

    As Terry Farrell replied to your other spew in this newsgroup,
    "Rubbish." Neither Vista nor Windows 7 forces the default mail client
    to anything.


    On Mon, 7 Sep 2009 14:55:01 -0700, jaws
    <> wrote:

    >Does Windows7 ALLOW you to use a default mail other than WindowsMail, as
    >Vista forces? Still trying to believe not only did Vista force this, but
    >gave no other options, and no work-arounds for it. As someone who's has had
    >more than one computer crash, WHY would I want my mail to download on my
    >computer, take up precious hard-drive space, AND be lost if computer were
    >lost/stolen/broken????? ... I would love to meet the brilliant mind that
    >came up with that ... and the brilliant one that decided customers would want
    >no other options ... gotta love a mind-reader.
    >
    >"Octavio" wrote:
    >
    >> When the new Windows 7 is expected to be on the retail stores for sale? Any
    >> idea of the retail prices?
    >>
    >> Will the Office Professional 2007 programs work well with it (I bet it will,
    >> since they are from the same company. Any anticipated problems? Slowness
    >> in old computers?)
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
     
    Jay Freedman, Sep 7, 2009
    #8
  9. "jaws" <> wrote:

    > Does Windows 7 ALLOW you to use a default mail other than WindowsMail, as
    > Vista forces? Still trying to believe not only did Vista force this, but
    > gave no other options, and no work-arounds for it.


    Windows 7 does not come with any default mail handler. You can add one if
    you wish. Windows Mail is not included with Windows 7. I'm currently using
    Outlook 2007, which works quite well for my needs.

    Vista *does* provide other options. I used Outlook 2007 in Vista as my
    default mail handler. Vista did not force Windows Mail, and allows you to
    choose any MAPI compliant program. I don't know where you got your
    information, but if you paid someone for it, you should demand a refund,
    because it's just plain wrong.

    Herb Tyson MS MVP
    Author of the Word 2007 Bible
    Blog: http://word2007bible.herbtyson.com
    Web: http://www.herbtyson.com
     
    Herb Tyson [MVP], Sep 8, 2009
    #9
  10. Octavio

    Gordon Guest

    "jaws" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    > WHY would I want my mail to download on my
    > computer, take up precious hard-drive space,


    Err ALL email clients "download" email to the HDD.........what makes you
    think they don't? (And BTW, accessing email through a web browser is NOT
    using an email client...)
     
    Gordon, Sep 8, 2009
    #10
  11. Not necessarily. When you use IMAP instead of POP, the mail downloads so you
    can look at it on your computer, but the decision to store messages on your
    own computer is entirely up to you. Email is stored on the server unless you
    explicitly remove/purge it, and so it does not "take up precious hard-drive
    space". Outlook, Windows Mail, Windows Live Mail, and Outlook Express are
    all mail clients that can do IMAP... to name just a few.


    Herb Tyson MS MVP
    Author of the Word 2007 Bible
    Blog: http://word2007bible.herbtyson.com
    Web: http://www.herbtyson.com


    "Gordon" <> wrote in message
    news:#...
    >
    > "jaws" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    >> WHY would I want my mail to download on my
    >> computer, take up precious hard-drive space,

    >
    > Err ALL email clients "download" email to the HDD.........what makes you
    > think they don't? (And BTW, accessing email through a web browser is NOT
    > using an email client...)
    >
    >
     
    Herb Tyson [MVP], Sep 11, 2009
    #11
  12. Octavio

    Gordon Guest

    "Herb Tyson [MVP]" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Not necessarily. When you use IMAP instead of POP, the mail downloads so
    > you can look at it on your computer, but the decision to store messages on
    > your own computer is entirely up to you.


    IMAP accounts in Outlook use a pst file - so the difference between
    "storing" and "viewing" is rather academic don't you think?
     
    Gordon, Sep 11, 2009
    #12
  13. Octavio

    Octavio Guest

    What is exactly the definition of "mail client"?
    I am the "mail client" , or who is, or what is? (please clarify this for
    me).
    Thanks in advance.




    "Herb Tyson [MVP]" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Not necessarily. When you use IMAP instead of POP, the mail downloads so
    > you can look at it on your computer, but the decision to store messages on
    > your own computer is entirely up to you. Email is stored on the server
    > unless you explicitly remove/purge it, and so it does not "take up
    > precious hard-drive space". Outlook, Windows Mail, Windows Live Mail, and
    > Outlook Express are all mail clients that can do IMAP... to name just a
    > few.
    >
    >
    > Herb Tyson MS MVP
    > Author of the Word 2007 Bible
    > Blog: http://word2007bible.herbtyson.com
    > Web: http://www.herbtyson.com
    >
    >
    > "Gordon" <> wrote in message
    > news:#...
    >>
    >> "jaws" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>
    >>> WHY would I want my mail to download on my
    >>> computer, take up precious hard-drive space,

    >>
    >> Err ALL email clients "download" email to the HDD.........what makes you
    >> think they don't? (And BTW, accessing email through a web browser is NOT
    >> using an email client...)
    >>
    >>
     
    Octavio, Sep 11, 2009
    #13
  14. Octavio

    Tom Willett Guest

    A mail client is the program used to send/receive mail, such as Outlook,
    Outlook Express, Thunderbird, etc.

    "Octavio" <> wrote in message
    news:%...
    : What is exactly the definition of "mail client"?
    : I am the "mail client" , or who is, or what is? (please clarify this for
    : me).
    : Thanks in advance.
    :
    :
    :
    :
    : "Herb Tyson [MVP]" <> wrote in message
    : news:...
    : > Not necessarily. When you use IMAP instead of POP, the mail downloads so
    : > you can look at it on your computer, but the decision to store messages
    on
    : > your own computer is entirely up to you. Email is stored on the server
    : > unless you explicitly remove/purge it, and so it does not "take up
    : > precious hard-drive space". Outlook, Windows Mail, Windows Live Mail,
    and
    : > Outlook Express are all mail clients that can do IMAP... to name just a
    : > few.
    : >
    : >
    : > Herb Tyson MS MVP
    : > Author of the Word 2007 Bible
    : > Blog: http://word2007bible.herbtyson.com
    : > Web: http://www.herbtyson.com
    : >
    : >
    : > "Gordon" <> wrote in message
    : > news:#...
    : >>
    : >> "jaws" <> wrote in message
    : >> news:...
    : >>
    : >>> WHY would I want my mail to download on my
    : >>> computer, take up precious hard-drive space,
    : >>
    : >> Err ALL email clients "download" email to the HDD.........what makes
    you
    : >> think they don't? (And BTW, accessing email through a web browser is
    NOT
    : >> using an email client...)
    : >>
    : >>
     
    Tom Willett, Sep 11, 2009
    #14
  15. The .pst for my POP account is over 2GB. The one for my IMAP account is
    265K. You might call that academic, I call it a substantial difference. The
    structure is there so you can read and manage email that resides on the
    server.


    Herb Tyson MS MVP
    Author of the Word 2007 Bible
    Blog: http://word2007bible.herbtyson.com
    Web: http://www.herbtyson.com


    "Gordon" <> wrote in message
    news:eFYql$...

    > IMAP accounts in Outlook use a pst file - so the difference between
    > "storing" and "viewing" is rather academic don't you think?
     
    Herb Tyson [MVP], Sep 12, 2009
    #15
  16. Octavio

    Gordon Guest

    "Herb Tyson [MVP]" <> wrote in message
    news:#...
    > The .pst for my POP account is over 2GB. The one for my IMAP account is
    > 265K. You might call that academic, I call it a substantial difference.
    > The structure is there so you can read and manage email that resides on
    > the server.
    >


    Did you count the OST file as well?
     
    Gordon, Sep 12, 2009
    #16
  17. An .ost file is an offline storage file where you CAN (but don't have to)
    store messages offline when working with an Exchange Server. I don't use
    Exchange, hence, I have no .ost file(s).

    Note that IMAP is similar in some ways to Exchange, but it is not the same.

    I have two .pst files currently in use. One is where POP delivery occurs (if
    I have POP accounts) and also where local item storage occurs.

    The second is the structure used for IMAP. Mail is not stored locally (i.e.,
    on my computer) in this second .pst file.

    When I receive an email on the IMAP server, it shows up in my IMAP .pst
    file. If I want to be able to see that message offline, I would need to copy
    it to a local folder. When I'm disconnected from the internet, nothing shows
    up in my IMAP .pst file.

    It is entirely possible to use IMAP and keep email exclusively on the
    server, with minimal local overhead in terms of disk space used.

    It's also possible to use POP and IMAP in parallel--this can be useful if
    you retrieve email using multiple computers (e.g., a laptop and a desktop),
    and want to use IMAP access to manage what's on the server, rather than as a
    way to read email.

    But, this has nothing to so with Word, so I'm not sure why it's here. In any
    case, for more detailed information about these intriguing topics, you might
    try one of the Outlook, Windows Mail, or Exchange newsgroups.

    --

    Herb Tyson MS MVP
    Author of the Word 2007 Bible
    Blog: http://word2007bible.herbtyson.com
    Web: http://www.herbtyson.com


    "Gordon" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > "Herb Tyson [MVP]" <> wrote in message
    > news:#...
    >> The .pst for my POP account is over 2GB. The one for my IMAP account is
    >> 265K. You might call that academic, I call it a substantial difference.
    >> The structure is there so you can read and manage email that resides on
    >> the server.
    >>

    >
    > Did you count the OST file as well?
     
    Herb Tyson [MVP], Sep 12, 2009
    #17
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