Unauthorized Password Deletion

Discussion in 'Windows XP Help' started by Guest, May 1, 2006.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest

    parent of a couple of cagey and savvy teenagers; in order to prevent late
    night usage of the family PC, I deleted the Guest Account and password
    protected the only other User account (mine). I would log off in the evening
    and everything was fine until a couple of weeks ago when I noticed that my
    password had been deleted and anyone could log on as me and use the computer.

    Changed the password three times in a row, even using brand new random ones,
    and within a couple of days, someone had deleted the password.

    So that I don't have to keep taking the mouse and keyboard away each night,
    anyone know how one of my teenagers is managing to pull this off? I don't
    notice any unusual software, so I am at a loss.

    Help!
     
    Guest, May 1, 2006
    #1
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  2. Guest

    Vanguard Guest

    "Confounded in KC" <Confounded in > wrote in
    message news:...
    > parent of a couple of cagey and savvy teenagers; in order to prevent
    > late
    > night usage of the family PC, I deleted the Guest Account and password
    > protected the only other User account (mine). I would log off in the
    > evening
    > and everything was fine until a couple of weeks ago when I noticed
    > that my
    > password had been deleted and anyone could log on as me and use the
    > computer.


    <snip>

    Did you ever give the Administrator account a password?

    --
    __________________________________________________
    Post replies to the newsgroup. Share with others.
    For e-mail: Remove "NIX" and add "#VN" to Subject.
    __________________________________________________
     
    Vanguard, May 1, 2006
    #2
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  3. Guest

    Kevin Guest

    "Confounded in KC" <Confounded in > wrote in
    message news:...
    > parent of a couple of cagey and savvy teenagers; in order to prevent late
    > night usage of the family PC, I deleted the Guest Account and password
    > protected the only other User account (mine). I would log off in the
    > evening
    > and everything was fine until a couple of weeks ago when I noticed that my
    > password had been deleted and anyone could log on as me and use the
    > computer.
    >
    > Changed the password three times in a row, even using brand new random
    > ones,
    > and within a couple of days, someone had deleted the password.
    >
    > So that I don't have to keep taking the mouse and keyboard away each
    > night,
    > anyone know how one of my teenagers is managing to pull this off? I don't
    > notice any unusual software, so I am at a loss.
    >
    > Help!


    Have you actually asked one of the little darlings if they were doing this?
    Point out that lying will bring about dread circumstances and dire times for
    them, not to mention the complete loss of all rights, privileges and
    freedom. And no computer.
     
    Kevin, May 1, 2006
    #3
  4. Guest

    David Candy Guest

    You are a great big wimp. Tie the kids to the clothesline. Give em a bowl of water though.

    --
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    How to lose a war in Iraq
    http://webdiary.com.au/cms/?q=node/1335#comment-48641
    =================================================
    "Kevin" <> wrote in message news:%...
    >
    > "Confounded in KC" <Confounded in > wrote in
    > message news:...
    >> parent of a couple of cagey and savvy teenagers; in order to prevent late
    >> night usage of the family PC, I deleted the Guest Account and password
    >> protected the only other User account (mine). I would log off in the
    >> evening
    >> and everything was fine until a couple of weeks ago when I noticed that my
    >> password had been deleted and anyone could log on as me and use the
    >> computer.
    >>
    >> Changed the password three times in a row, even using brand new random
    >> ones,
    >> and within a couple of days, someone had deleted the password.
    >>
    >> So that I don't have to keep taking the mouse and keyboard away each
    >> night,
    >> anyone know how one of my teenagers is managing to pull this off? I don't
    >> notice any unusual software, so I am at a loss.
    >>
    >> Help!

    >
    > Have you actually asked one of the little darlings if they were doing this?
    > Point out that lying will bring about dread circumstances and dire times for
    > them, not to mention the complete loss of all rights, privileges and
    > freedom. And no computer.
    >
    >
     
    David Candy, May 1, 2006
    #4
  5. 10 Immutable Laws of Security
    http://www.microsoft.com/technet/archive/community/columns/security/essays/10imlaws.mspx

    Microsoft Shared Computer Toolkit for Windows XP
    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/sharedaccess/default.mspx

    --
    Carey Frisch
    Microsoft MVP
    Windows - Shell/User
    Microsoft Community Newsgroups
    news://msnews.microsoft.com/

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------­----------------

    "Confounded in KC" wrote:

    | parent of a couple of cagey and savvy teenagers; in order to prevent late
    | night usage of the family PC, I deleted the Guest Account and password
    | protected the only other User account (mine). I would log off in the evening
    | and everything was fine until a couple of weeks ago when I noticed that my
    | password had been deleted and anyone could log on as me and use the computer.
    |
    | Changed the password three times in a row, even using brand new random ones,
    | and within a couple of days, someone had deleted the password.
    |
    | So that I don't have to keep taking the mouse and keyboard away each night,
    | anyone know how one of my teenagers is managing to pull this off? I don't
    | notice any unusual software, so I am at a loss.
    |
    | Help!
     
    Carey Frisch [MVP], May 1, 2006
    #5
  6. Guest

    Guest Guest

    The only user account that I have set up is mine and yes, it is the
    administrator account that we are talking about.

    "Vanguard" wrote:

    > "Confounded in KC" <Confounded in > wrote in
    > message news:...
    > > parent of a couple of cagey and savvy teenagers; in order to prevent
    > > late
    > > night usage of the family PC, I deleted the Guest Account and password
    > > protected the only other User account (mine). I would log off in the
    > > evening
    > > and everything was fine until a couple of weeks ago when I noticed
    > > that my
    > > password had been deleted and anyone could log on as me and use the
    > > computer.

    >
    > <snip>
    >
    > Did you ever give the Administrator account a password?
    >
    > --
    > __________________________________________________
    > Post replies to the newsgroup. Share with others.
    > For e-mail: Remove "NIX" and add "#VN" to Subject.
    > __________________________________________________
    >
    >
     
    Guest, May 1, 2006
    #6
  7. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Actually, I have four kids and the two oldest (the most likely candidates)
    have friends over often. All the kids deny doing this, and the two youngest,
    though computer users, are probably not the problem. But I am trying to find
    a solution that will give me back control of the use of the computer so as to
    not unfairly punish whichever one (or their friends) that is doing this.

    Figured there must be some hack program or routine that allows someone to
    delete a Windows password even if you don't know the original one, or
    something else that is remembering my password so they can go in and delete
    it in an authorized mode.

    "Kevin" wrote:

    >
    > "Confounded in KC" <Confounded in > wrote in
    > message news:...
    > > parent of a couple of cagey and savvy teenagers; in order to prevent late
    > > night usage of the family PC, I deleted the Guest Account and password
    > > protected the only other User account (mine). I would log off in the
    > > evening
    > > and everything was fine until a couple of weeks ago when I noticed that my
    > > password had been deleted and anyone could log on as me and use the
    > > computer.
    > >
    > > Changed the password three times in a row, even using brand new random
    > > ones,
    > > and within a couple of days, someone had deleted the password.
    > >
    > > So that I don't have to keep taking the mouse and keyboard away each
    > > night,
    > > anyone know how one of my teenagers is managing to pull this off? I don't
    > > notice any unusual software, so I am at a loss.
    > >
    > > Help!

    >
    > Have you actually asked one of the little darlings if they were doing this?
    > Point out that lying will bring about dread circumstances and dire times for
    > them, not to mention the complete loss of all rights, privileges and
    > freedom. And no computer.
    >
    >
    >
     
    Guest, May 1, 2006
    #7
  8. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Not a whole lot help are we David? Figured that in lieu of continuing to
    take the computer access away from all of the kids, someone in this newsgroup
    might be aware of a hacking program or technique that would allow me to short
    circuit the offender.

    "David Candy" wrote:

    > You are a great big wimp. Tie the kids to the clothesline. Give em a bowl of water though.
    >
    > --
    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    > How to lose a war in Iraq
    > http://webdiary.com.au/cms/?q=node/1335#comment-48641
    > =================================================
    > "Kevin" <> wrote in message news:%...
    > >
    > > "Confounded in KC" <Confounded in > wrote in
    > > message news:...
    > >> parent of a couple of cagey and savvy teenagers; in order to prevent late
    > >> night usage of the family PC, I deleted the Guest Account and password
    > >> protected the only other User account (mine). I would log off in the
    > >> evening
    > >> and everything was fine until a couple of weeks ago when I noticed that my
    > >> password had been deleted and anyone could log on as me and use the
    > >> computer.
    > >>
    > >> Changed the password three times in a row, even using brand new random
    > >> ones,
    > >> and within a couple of days, someone had deleted the password.
    > >>
    > >> So that I don't have to keep taking the mouse and keyboard away each
    > >> night,
    > >> anyone know how one of my teenagers is managing to pull this off? I don't
    > >> notice any unusual software, so I am at a loss.
    > >>
    > >> Help!

    > >
    > > Have you actually asked one of the little darlings if they were doing this?
    > > Point out that lying will bring about dread circumstances and dire times for
    > > them, not to mention the complete loss of all rights, privileges and
    > > freedom. And no computer.
    > >
    > >

    >
     
    Guest, May 1, 2006
    #8
  9. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Carey, thanks for the tips. I pretty much follow all the "10" tips, and I
    will check out the Shared Toolkit idea.

    Was just curious if anyone out there knew of a hack program or technique
    that could be used to steal my password so that they could delete it, or a
    hole in the system that would allow someone to delete the password even if
    they didn't know it.

    I have changed the password several times and only written it down on my PDA
    which my kids do not have access to (and is also password protected).
    Figured there was some way they were getting around the Windows password
    thing and I wanted to see if I could 1) stop it, and 2) find out who is doing
    it.

    "Carey Frisch [MVP]" wrote:

    > 10 Immutable Laws of Security
    > http://www.microsoft.com/technet/archive/community/columns/security/essays/10imlaws.mspx
    >
    > Microsoft Shared Computer Toolkit for Windows XP
    > http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/sharedaccess/default.mspx
    >
    > --
    > Carey Frisch
    > Microsoft MVP
    > Windows - Shell/User
    > Microsoft Community Newsgroups
    > news://msnews.microsoft.com/
    >
    > ---------------------------------------------------------------------------­----------------
    >
    > "Confounded in KC" wrote:
    >
    > | parent of a couple of cagey and savvy teenagers; in order to prevent late
    > | night usage of the family PC, I deleted the Guest Account and password
    > | protected the only other User account (mine). I would log off in the evening
    > | and everything was fine until a couple of weeks ago when I noticed that my
    > | password had been deleted and anyone could log on as me and use the computer.
    > |
    > | Changed the password three times in a row, even using brand new random ones,
    > | and within a couple of days, someone had deleted the password.
    > |
    > | So that I don't have to keep taking the mouse and keyboard away each night,
    > | anyone know how one of my teenagers is managing to pull this off? I don't
    > | notice any unusual software, so I am at a loss.
    > |
    > | Help!
    >
    >
     
    Guest, May 1, 2006
    #9
  10. Guest

    Ricky Guest

    In XP Home there is a administer account that is only seen when you boot in
    safe mode. If this is not password protected you can use it to change
    passwords in other accounts.

    "Confounded in KC" <> wrote in
    message news:...
    > Actually, I have four kids and the two oldest (the most likely candidates)
    > have friends over often. All the kids deny doing this, and the two
    > youngest,
    > though computer users, are probably not the problem. But I am trying to
    > find
    > a solution that will give me back control of the use of the computer so as
    > to
    > not unfairly punish whichever one (or their friends) that is doing this.
    >
    > Figured there must be some hack program or routine that allows someone to
    > delete a Windows password even if you don't know the original one, or
    > something else that is remembering my password so they can go in and
    > delete
    > it in an authorized mode.
    >
    > "Kevin" wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> "Confounded in KC" <Confounded in > wrote in
    >> message news:...
    >> > parent of a couple of cagey and savvy teenagers; in order to prevent
    >> > late
    >> > night usage of the family PC, I deleted the Guest Account and password
    >> > protected the only other User account (mine). I would log off in the
    >> > evening
    >> > and everything was fine until a couple of weeks ago when I noticed that
    >> > my
    >> > password had been deleted and anyone could log on as me and use the
    >> > computer.
    >> >
    >> > Changed the password three times in a row, even using brand new random
    >> > ones,
    >> > and within a couple of days, someone had deleted the password.
    >> >
    >> > So that I don't have to keep taking the mouse and keyboard away each
    >> > night,
    >> > anyone know how one of my teenagers is managing to pull this off? I
    >> > don't
    >> > notice any unusual software, so I am at a loss.
    >> >
    >> > Help!

    >>
    >> Have you actually asked one of the little darlings if they were doing
    >> this?
    >> Point out that lying will bring about dread circumstances and dire times
    >> for
    >> them, not to mention the complete loss of all rights, privileges and
    >> freedom. And no computer.
    >>
    >>
    >>
     
    Ricky, May 1, 2006
    #10
  11. Guest

    David Candy Guest

    Vanguard answered you with the most likely cause.

    --
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    How to lose a war in Iraq
    http://webdiary.com.au/cms/?q=node/1335#comment-48641
    =================================================
    "Confounded in KC" <> wrote in message news:...
    > Not a whole lot help are we David? Figured that in lieu of continuing to
    > take the computer access away from all of the kids, someone in this newsgroup
    > might be aware of a hacking program or technique that would allow me to short
    > circuit the offender.
    >
    > "David Candy" wrote:
    >
    >> You are a great big wimp. Tie the kids to the clothesline. Give em a bowl of water though.
    >>
    >> --
    >> --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    >> How to lose a war in Iraq
    >> http://webdiary.com.au/cms/?q=node/1335#comment-48641
    >> =================================================
    >> "Kevin" <> wrote in message news:%...
    >> >
    >> > "Confounded in KC" <Confounded in > wrote in
    >> > message news:...
    >> >> parent of a couple of cagey and savvy teenagers; in order to prevent late
    >> >> night usage of the family PC, I deleted the Guest Account and password
    >> >> protected the only other User account (mine). I would log off in the
    >> >> evening
    >> >> and everything was fine until a couple of weeks ago when I noticed that my
    >> >> password had been deleted and anyone could log on as me and use the
    >> >> computer.
    >> >>
    >> >> Changed the password three times in a row, even using brand new random
    >> >> ones,
    >> >> and within a couple of days, someone had deleted the password.
    >> >>
    >> >> So that I don't have to keep taking the mouse and keyboard away each
    >> >> night,
    >> >> anyone know how one of my teenagers is managing to pull this off? I don't
    >> >> notice any unusual software, so I am at a loss.
    >> >>
    >> >> Help!
    >> >
    >> > Have you actually asked one of the little darlings if they were doing this?
    >> > Point out that lying will bring about dread circumstances and dire times for
    >> > them, not to mention the complete loss of all rights, privileges and
    >> > freedom. And no computer.
    >> >
    >> >

    >>
     
    David Candy, May 1, 2006
    #11
  12. Guest

    Lisa K Guest

    Everybody's right about logging into safe mode and password protecting the
    Administrator account. Another, more intense and less likely to be reversed
    method would be to password protect the computer on startup which is done in
    the bios. Not recommended if you're unsure of what you're doing. ;-) good
    luck! I have teenagers too! very scary!!


    "Confounded in KC" <> wrote in
    message news:...
    > Carey, thanks for the tips. I pretty much follow all the "10" tips, and I
    > will check out the Shared Toolkit idea.
    >
    > Was just curious if anyone out there knew of a hack program or technique
    > that could be used to steal my password so that they could delete it, or a
    > hole in the system that would allow someone to delete the password even if
    > they didn't know it.
    >
    > I have changed the password several times and only written it down on my
    > PDA
    > which my kids do not have access to (and is also password protected).
    > Figured there was some way they were getting around the Windows password
    > thing and I wanted to see if I could 1) stop it, and 2) find out who is
    > doing
    > it.
    >
    > "Carey Frisch [MVP]" wrote:
    >
    >> 10 Immutable Laws of Security
    >> http://www.microsoft.com/technet/archive/community/columns/security/essays/10imlaws.mspx
    >>
    >> Microsoft Shared Computer Toolkit for Windows XP
    >> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/sharedaccess/default.mspx
    >>
    >> --
    >> Carey Frisch
    >> Microsoft MVP
    >> Windows - Shell/User
    >> Microsoft Community Newsgroups
    >> news://msnews.microsoft.com/
    >>
    >> ---------------------------------------------------------------------------­----------------
    >>
    >> "Confounded in KC" wrote:
    >>
    >> | parent of a couple of cagey and savvy teenagers; in order to prevent
    >> late
    >> | night usage of the family PC, I deleted the Guest Account and password
    >> | protected the only other User account (mine). I would log off in the
    >> evening
    >> | and everything was fine until a couple of weeks ago when I noticed that
    >> my
    >> | password had been deleted and anyone could log on as me and use the
    >> computer.
    >> |
    >> | Changed the password three times in a row, even using brand new random
    >> ones,
    >> | and within a couple of days, someone had deleted the password.
    >> |
    >> | So that I don't have to keep taking the mouse and keyboard away each
    >> night,
    >> | anyone know how one of my teenagers is managing to pull this off? I
    >> don't
    >> | notice any unusual software, so I am at a loss.
    >> |
    >> | Help!
    >>
    >>
     
    Lisa K, May 1, 2006
    #12
  13. Guest

    Vanguard Guest

    "Confounded in KC" <> wrote in
    message news:...
    > The only user account that I have set up is mine and yes, it is the
    > administrator account that we are talking about.



    You don't have to "setup" the Administrator account. Sounds like you
    created *another* account with admin privileges but it is not the
    Administrator account. What is the account name under which you login
    and that you think is the only admin-level account?

    Have you used any anti-malware software to check for a keylogger? You
    could change the password but the pests, er, kids would simply use the
    keylogger to find out what changes you made.

    Are you using a SECURE password? Is it a strong password? Or are you
    using one of your names (first, last, middle, nickname), your spouse
    name, a pet's name, a house address, or some other information that the
    pest can easily guess at? What happens when you try a jumbled mess of
    characters? I use an algorithm that lets me remember passwords but
    provides a different password for every host or site on which I login.
    For example, use the last 2 digits of your birthyear, a couple digits
    from a fixed position in your driver's license, your initials in reverse
    order, and a few characters of the domain or site to create a unique
    password. You know the algorithm and you know the host or site so you
    can reconstruct what is your password, but it looks like a mess to
    anyone else.

    So why not simply put the computer in your bedroom or den and lock the
    door? Obviously the pests have decided they don't need to comply with
    your rules, so punish them by physically removing access to the
    computer. Did they pay for it? Whose computer is it really? So far,
    they have been training you rather than you training them. Whose the
    parent?
     
    Vanguard, May 1, 2006
    #13
  14. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Well, I don't pretend to be too techno-savvy, but maybe this will answer your
    question. There is just one User Account - me, and it has administrator
    rights. When I start up the computer and Windows loads, you end up at the
    blue welcome screen with my name as the only account. You have to enter my
    password to get in.

    And yes, I do use lenghty and pretty secure passwords and there really isn't
    a way one of the kids could "guess" it.

    As far as anti-spyware/malware, I rountinely run Microsoft's AntiSpyware,
    Norton Antivirus, Spyware Doctor, Spybot Search & Destroy and Ad-Aware to
    clean things up, but unless the deviant is reloading the program each time, I
    haven't found anything with any of these that looks like a key-logger (though
    I don't profess to know the names of common key-logger programs).

    Do you know of any other anti program you'd recommend that could check for
    key-logger programs in particular?



    "Vanguard" wrote:

    > "Confounded in KC" <> wrote in
    > message news:...
    > > The only user account that I have set up is mine and yes, it is the
    > > administrator account that we are talking about.

    >
    >
    > You don't have to "setup" the Administrator account. Sounds like you
    > created *another* account with admin privileges but it is not the
    > Administrator account. What is the account name under which you login
    > and that you think is the only admin-level account?
    >
    > Have you used any anti-malware software to check for a keylogger? You
    > could change the password but the pests, er, kids would simply use the
    > keylogger to find out what changes you made.
    >
    > Are you using a SECURE password? Is it a strong password? Or are you
    > using one of your names (first, last, middle, nickname), your spouse
    > name, a pet's name, a house address, or some other information that the
    > pest can easily guess at? What happens when you try a jumbled mess of
    > characters? I use an algorithm that lets me remember passwords but
    > provides a different password for every host or site on which I login.
    > For example, use the last 2 digits of your birthyear, a couple digits
    > from a fixed position in your driver's license, your initials in reverse
    > order, and a few characters of the domain or site to create a unique
    > password. You know the algorithm and you know the host or site so you
    > can reconstruct what is your password, but it looks like a mess to
    > anyone else.
    >
    > So why not simply put the computer in your bedroom or den and lock the
    > door? Obviously the pests have decided they don't need to comply with
    > your rules, so punish them by physically removing access to the
    > computer. Did they pay for it? Whose computer is it really? So far,
    > they have been training you rather than you training them. Whose the
    > parent?
    >
    >
     
    Guest, May 2, 2006
    #14
  15. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Thanks Ricky, didn't know anything about that safe mode aspect. So, if they
    re-boot the machine into safe mode, they can delete any user password that is
    set up? I have noticed that when the kid does whatever they are doing, they
    aren't putting in a new password, they are simply deleting my old password.

    How do you password protect the administrator account in Safe mode, and
    exactly how do you boot up into safe mode to do this?


    "Ricky" wrote:

    > In XP Home there is a administer account that is only seen when you boot in
    > safe mode. If this is not password protected you can use it to change
    > passwords in other accounts.
    >
    > "Confounded in KC" <> wrote in
    > message news:...
    > > Actually, I have four kids and the two oldest (the most likely candidates)
    > > have friends over often. All the kids deny doing this, and the two
    > > youngest,
    > > though computer users, are probably not the problem. But I am trying to
    > > find
    > > a solution that will give me back control of the use of the computer so as
    > > to
    > > not unfairly punish whichever one (or their friends) that is doing this.
    > >
    > > Figured there must be some hack program or routine that allows someone to
    > > delete a Windows password even if you don't know the original one, or
    > > something else that is remembering my password so they can go in and
    > > delete
    > > it in an authorized mode.
    > >
    > > "Kevin" wrote:
    > >
    > >>
    > >> "Confounded in KC" <Confounded in > wrote in
    > >> message news:...
    > >> > parent of a couple of cagey and savvy teenagers; in order to prevent
    > >> > late
    > >> > night usage of the family PC, I deleted the Guest Account and password
    > >> > protected the only other User account (mine). I would log off in the
    > >> > evening
    > >> > and everything was fine until a couple of weeks ago when I noticed that
    > >> > my
    > >> > password had been deleted and anyone could log on as me and use the
    > >> > computer.
    > >> >
    > >> > Changed the password three times in a row, even using brand new random
    > >> > ones,
    > >> > and within a couple of days, someone had deleted the password.
    > >> >
    > >> > So that I don't have to keep taking the mouse and keyboard away each
    > >> > night,
    > >> > anyone know how one of my teenagers is managing to pull this off? I
    > >> > don't
    > >> > notice any unusual software, so I am at a loss.
    > >> >
    > >> > Help!
    > >>
    > >> Have you actually asked one of the little darlings if they were doing
    > >> this?
    > >> Point out that lying will bring about dread circumstances and dire times
    > >> for
    > >> them, not to mention the complete loss of all rights, privileges and
    > >> freedom. And no computer.
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>

    >
    >
    >
     
    Guest, May 2, 2006
    #15
  16. Guest

    David Candy Guest

    Press Ctrl + Alt + Delete twice at the welcome screen (Pro only) and you can enter name/password for the Administrator account. For Home, boot to safe mode to access this account. The inbuilt admin account, like any admin account, can reset passwords for any user.

    Security requires no physical access to the computer.
    --
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    How to lose a war in Iraq
    http://webdiary.com.au/cms/?q=node/1335#comment-48641
    =================================================
    "Confounded in KC" <> wrote in message news:...
    > Well, I don't pretend to be too techno-savvy, but maybe this will answer your
    > question. There is just one User Account - me, and it has administrator
    > rights. When I start up the computer and Windows loads, you end up at the
    > blue welcome screen with my name as the only account. You have to enter my
    > password to get in.
    >
    > And yes, I do use lenghty and pretty secure passwords and there really isn't
    > a way one of the kids could "guess" it.
    >
    > As far as anti-spyware/malware, I rountinely run Microsoft's AntiSpyware,
    > Norton Antivirus, Spyware Doctor, Spybot Search & Destroy and Ad-Aware to
    > clean things up, but unless the deviant is reloading the program each time, I
    > haven't found anything with any of these that looks like a key-logger (though
    > I don't profess to know the names of common key-logger programs).
    >
    > Do you know of any other anti program you'd recommend that could check for
    > key-logger programs in particular?
    >
    >
    >
    > "Vanguard" wrote:
    >
    >> "Confounded in KC" <> wrote in
    >> message news:...
    >> > The only user account that I have set up is mine and yes, it is the
    >> > administrator account that we are talking about.

    >>
    >>
    >> You don't have to "setup" the Administrator account. Sounds like you
    >> created *another* account with admin privileges but it is not the
    >> Administrator account. What is the account name under which you login
    >> and that you think is the only admin-level account?
    >>
    >> Have you used any anti-malware software to check for a keylogger? You
    >> could change the password but the pests, er, kids would simply use the
    >> keylogger to find out what changes you made.
    >>
    >> Are you using a SECURE password? Is it a strong password? Or are you
    >> using one of your names (first, last, middle, nickname), your spouse
    >> name, a pet's name, a house address, or some other information that the
    >> pest can easily guess at? What happens when you try a jumbled mess of
    >> characters? I use an algorithm that lets me remember passwords but
    >> provides a different password for every host or site on which I login.
    >> For example, use the last 2 digits of your birthyear, a couple digits
    >> from a fixed position in your driver's license, your initials in reverse
    >> order, and a few characters of the domain or site to create a unique
    >> password. You know the algorithm and you know the host or site so you
    >> can reconstruct what is your password, but it looks like a mess to
    >> anyone else.
    >>
    >> So why not simply put the computer in your bedroom or den and lock the
    >> door? Obviously the pests have decided they don't need to comply with
    >> your rules, so punish them by physically removing access to the
    >> computer. Did they pay for it? Whose computer is it really? So far,
    >> they have been training you rather than you training them. Whose the
    >> parent?
    >>
    >>
     
    David Candy, May 2, 2006
    #16
  17. Guest

    Ricky Guest

    You start tapping F8 when you first turn the computer on..then you get a
    screen with several options. Pick Safe Mode and on the welcome screen you
    should see your account and the default admin account. Pick the default
    account and when logged in go to control panel..user accounts and set a
    password for the account there.

    "Confounded in KC" <> wrote in
    message news:...
    > Thanks Ricky, didn't know anything about that safe mode aspect. So, if
    > they
    > re-boot the machine into safe mode, they can delete any user password that
    > is
    > set up? I have noticed that when the kid does whatever they are doing,
    > they
    > aren't putting in a new password, they are simply deleting my old
    > password.
    >
    > How do you password protect the administrator account in Safe mode, and
    > exactly how do you boot up into safe mode to do this?
    >
    >
    > "Ricky" wrote:
    >
    >> In XP Home there is a administer account that is only seen when you boot
    >> in
    >> safe mode. If this is not password protected you can use it to change
    >> passwords in other accounts.
    >>
    >> "Confounded in KC" <> wrote in
    >> message news:...
    >> > Actually, I have four kids and the two oldest (the most likely
    >> > candidates)
    >> > have friends over often. All the kids deny doing this, and the two
    >> > youngest,
    >> > though computer users, are probably not the problem. But I am trying
    >> > to
    >> > find
    >> > a solution that will give me back control of the use of the computer so
    >> > as
    >> > to
    >> > not unfairly punish whichever one (or their friends) that is doing
    >> > this.
    >> >
    >> > Figured there must be some hack program or routine that allows someone
    >> > to
    >> > delete a Windows password even if you don't know the original one, or
    >> > something else that is remembering my password so they can go in and
    >> > delete
    >> > it in an authorized mode.
    >> >
    >> > "Kevin" wrote:
    >> >
    >> >>
    >> >> "Confounded in KC" <Confounded in > wrote
    >> >> in
    >> >> message news:...
    >> >> > parent of a couple of cagey and savvy teenagers; in order to prevent
    >> >> > late
    >> >> > night usage of the family PC, I deleted the Guest Account and
    >> >> > password
    >> >> > protected the only other User account (mine). I would log off in the
    >> >> > evening
    >> >> > and everything was fine until a couple of weeks ago when I noticed
    >> >> > that
    >> >> > my
    >> >> > password had been deleted and anyone could log on as me and use the
    >> >> > computer.
    >> >> >
    >> >> > Changed the password three times in a row, even using brand new
    >> >> > random
    >> >> > ones,
    >> >> > and within a couple of days, someone had deleted the password.
    >> >> >
    >> >> > So that I don't have to keep taking the mouse and keyboard away each
    >> >> > night,
    >> >> > anyone know how one of my teenagers is managing to pull this off? I
    >> >> > don't
    >> >> > notice any unusual software, so I am at a loss.
    >> >> >
    >> >> > Help!
    >> >>
    >> >> Have you actually asked one of the little darlings if they were doing
    >> >> this?
    >> >> Point out that lying will bring about dread circumstances and dire
    >> >> times
    >> >> for
    >> >> them, not to mention the complete loss of all rights, privileges and
    >> >> freedom. And no computer.
    >> >>
    >> >>
    >> >>

    >>
    >>
    >>
     
    Ricky, May 2, 2006
    #17
  18. Confounded in KC wrote:
    > parent of a couple of cagey and savvy teenagers; in order to prevent late
    > night usage of the family PC, I deleted the Guest Account and password
    > protected the only other User account (mine). I would log off in the evening
    > and everything was fine until a couple of weeks ago when I noticed that my
    > password had been deleted and anyone could log on as me and use the computer.
    >
    > Changed the password three times in a row, even using brand new random ones,
    > and within a couple of days, someone had deleted the password.
    >
    > So that I don't have to keep taking the mouse and keyboard away each night,
    > anyone know how one of my teenagers is managing to pull this off? I don't
    > notice any unusual software, so I am at a loss.
    >
    > Help!



    Set a strong password on the built-in Administrator account.


    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary
    safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. -Benjamin Franklin
     
    Bruce Chambers, May 2, 2006
    #18
  19. Confounded in KC wrote:
    > Carey, thanks for the tips. I pretty much follow all the "10" tips, and I
    > will check out the Shared Toolkit idea.
    >
    > Was just curious if anyone out there knew of a hack program or technique
    > that could be used to steal my password so that they could delete it, or a
    > hole in the system that would allow someone to delete the password even if
    > they didn't know it.
    >



    Yes, there are several such programs freely available on the Internet.
    Linux-based password cracking utilities abound on the Internet, freely
    available to anyone who can use Google. One needs only know how to find
    Google's search site to gain knowledge of, and access to, these programs.

    Without physical security, there is *no* security. Given access a
    computer and a little time, any semi-knowledgeable individual can access
    the full contents of the hard drive. Only encrypted files would be
    reasonably safe.



    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary
    safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. -Benjamin Franklin
     
    Bruce Chambers, May 2, 2006
    #19
  20. Guest

    Vanguard Guest

    "Confounded in KC" <> wrote in
    message news:...
    > Well, I don't pretend to be too techno-savvy, but maybe this will
    > answer your
    > question. There is just one User Account - me, and it has
    > administrator
    > rights. When I start up the computer and Windows loads, you end up at
    > the
    > blue welcome screen with my name as the only account. You have to
    > enter my
    > password to get in.



    Sounds like you are using the Fisher-Price welcome screen. That will
    only show the Administrator account until you define another admin-level
    account, then the Administrator account is hidden. I think the trick is
    to hit Ctrl+Alt+Del twice to get the regular non-fluffy login screen
    where you can then enter Administrator for the account name. You have
    been logging under your own admin-level account but it looks like the
    kids have been logging under the Administrator account.

    The default after installation is a blank password for the Administrator
    account (although, I believe, you are prompted to specify a non-blank
    password). With a blank password, anyone can login under the
    Administrator account and do whatever they want.

    --
    __________________________________________________
    Post replies to the newsgroup. Share with others.
    For e-mail: Remove "NIX" and add "#VN" to Subject.
    __________________________________________________
     
    Vanguard, May 2, 2006
    #20
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