Speed-test results not good

Discussion in 'Windows XP Hardware' started by Princess Platypus, Nov 7, 2006.

  1. Following the addition of a new hard drive (one that has been giving me
    trouble), my system performance deteriorated. I went to Device Manager
    and ran a speed test on my IDE ATA/ATAPI controllers.

    Drive #1 (boot drive; 160GB) has its transfer mode automatically set to
    Serial ATA DMA. Results of the speed test: theoretical limit is 150.0,
    burst speed 56.5, sustained speed 37.1.

    Drive #2 (the new, troublesome drive; 200GB) is also a serial ATA
    drive, but it has had its transfer mode automatically re-set to PIO.
    Results of the speed test: theoretical limit is 16.0, burst speed 2.7,
    sustained speed of 2.7. There is a note that the transfer mode has been
    downgraded due to
    "excessive transfer errors to this device."

    Drive #3 (old drive; 30GB) is a parallel ATA drive. Transfer mode is
    set to Ultra DMA 6 - Ultra 133. Results of the speed test: theoretical
    limit is 133.3, burst speed 75.2, sustained speed 15.5.

    I reformatted Drive #2 and that didn't improve things at all.

    Any help welcome and appreciated.
     
    Princess Platypus, Nov 7, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Princess Platypus

    David Vair Guest

    Drive read errors may be due to physical defects on the drive. See if there are any diagnostic
    utilities available from the manufacturer to test it.
    --
    Dave Vair
    CNE, CNA, MCP, A+, N+

    "Princess Platypus" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Following the addition of a new hard drive (one that has been giving me
    > trouble), my system performance deteriorated. I went to Device Manager
    > and ran a speed test on my IDE ATA/ATAPI controllers.
    >
    > Drive #1 (boot drive; 160GB) has its transfer mode automatically set to
    > Serial ATA DMA. Results of the speed test: theoretical limit is 150.0,
    > burst speed 56.5, sustained speed 37.1.
    >
    > Drive #2 (the new, troublesome drive; 200GB) is also a serial ATA
    > drive, but it has had its transfer mode automatically re-set to PIO.
    > Results of the speed test: theoretical limit is 16.0, burst speed 2.7,
    > sustained speed of 2.7. There is a note that the transfer mode has been
    > downgraded due to
    > "excessive transfer errors to this device."
    >
    > Drive #3 (old drive; 30GB) is a parallel ATA drive. Transfer mode is
    > set to Ultra DMA 6 - Ultra 133. Results of the speed test: theoretical
    > limit is 133.3, burst speed 75.2, sustained speed 15.5.
    >
    > I reformatted Drive #2 and that didn't improve things at all.
    >
    > Any help welcome and appreciated.
    >
     
    David Vair, Nov 7, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. Princess Platypus

    Guest Guest

    Thank you for your reply. I ran the manufacturer's diagnostics and the drive
    passed all of them.

    I suspect that one of the things (if not the thing) that caused my computer
    to tell me the drive had excessive transfer errors was because I aborted two
    back-up files that I was writing to the drive (they were huge and were going
    to take days).

    Would successfully completing several copies to the drive help at all?

    Any other ideas?

    "David Vair" wrote:

    > Drive read errors may be due to physical defects on the drive. See if there are any diagnostic
    > utilities available from the manufacturer to test it.
    > --
    > Dave Vair
    > CNE, CNA, MCP, A+, N+
    >
    > "Princess Platypus" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Following the addition of a new hard drive (one that has been giving me
    > > trouble), my system performance deteriorated. I went to Device Manager
    > > and ran a speed test on my IDE ATA/ATAPI controllers.
    > >
    > > Drive #1 (boot drive; 160GB) has its transfer mode automatically set to
    > > Serial ATA DMA. Results of the speed test: theoretical limit is 150.0,
    > > burst speed 56.5, sustained speed 37.1.
    > >
    > > Drive #2 (the new, troublesome drive; 200GB) is also a serial ATA
    > > drive, but it has had its transfer mode automatically re-set to PIO.
    > > Results of the speed test: theoretical limit is 16.0, burst speed 2.7,
    > > sustained speed of 2.7. There is a note that the transfer mode has been
    > > downgraded due to
    > > "excessive transfer errors to this device."
    > >
    > > Drive #3 (old drive; 30GB) is a parallel ATA drive. Transfer mode is
    > > set to Ultra DMA 6 - Ultra 133. Results of the speed test: theoretical
    > > limit is 133.3, burst speed 75.2, sustained speed 15.5.
    > >
    > > I reformatted Drive #2 and that didn't improve things at all.
    > >
    > > Any help welcome and appreciated.
    > >

    >
    >
    >
     
    Guest, Nov 8, 2006
    #3
    1. Advertisements

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Guest
    Replies:
    6
    Views:
    413
    Mikey
    Nov 26, 2003
  2. Ray

    USB flash drive read write speed test

    Ray, Aug 11, 2005, in forum: Windows XP Hardware
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    244
    Bob I
    Aug 11, 2005
  3. Guest

    Broadband speed test

    Guest, Feb 11, 2006, in forum: Windows XP Hardware
    Replies:
    7
    Views:
    376
  4. verbatim hi-speed usb drive not hi-speed

    , Feb 26, 2006, in forum: Windows XP Hardware
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    293
    Mary Sauer
    Feb 26, 2006
  5. iBizTalk

    How to test USB speed / performance

    iBizTalk, Oct 26, 2007, in forum: Windows XP Hardware
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    223
    M.I.5¾
    Oct 30, 2007
Loading...

Share This Page