Q: Using a Magnetised Screwdriver on a Motherboard

Discussion in 'Asus Motherboards' started by Eyman, Jul 11, 2003.

  1. Eyman

    Eyman Guest

    Hi,

    Im about to remove my A7N8X Deluxe motherboard from my computer case to
    install a heatsink fan.

    Ive typically been using a standard non magnetised screwdriver in the past,
    but am thinking about using a magnetised screwdriver to remove and install
    the motherboard in and out of the case.

    I know static electricity is a danger but will the manget effect of the
    screwdriver stuff up my A7N8X Delkuxe?

    thanks in advance

    Eyman
     
    Eyman, Jul 11, 2003
    #1
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  2. Eyman

    Papa Guest

    Re: Using a Magnetised Screwdriver on a Motherboard

    Not a good idea, and neither are electric screwdrivers.

    I've been trying to find a set of the early design screwdrivers that have
    the little clip for holding the screw head, but they seem to have
    disappeared from the market. Anyone know a source? Thanks.

    "Eyman" <> wrote in message
    news:bel12c$6dltk$-berlin.de...
    > Hi,
    >
    > Im about to remove my A7N8X Deluxe motherboard from my computer case to
    > install a heatsink fan.
    >
    > Ive typically been using a standard non magnetised screwdriver in the

    past,
    > but am thinking about using a magnetised screwdriver to remove and

    install
    > the motherboard in and out of the case.
    >
    > I know static electricity is a danger but will the manget effect of the
    > screwdriver stuff up my A7N8X Delkuxe?
    >
    > thanks in advance
    >
    > Eyman
    >
    >
    >
     
    Papa, Jul 11, 2003
    #2
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  3. Re: Using a Magnetised Screwdriver on a Motherboard

    I've never used anything but a magnetized screwdriver, and I've built so
    many machines I've lost count. No problems, ever. And I've even used this
    same screwdriver to mount hard drives. The tip does not have a very strong
    magnetic field though.

    Regards,

    Margaret

    "Eyman" <> wrote in message
    news:bel12c$6dltk$-berlin.de...
    > Hi,
    >
    > Im about to remove my A7N8X Deluxe motherboard from my computer case to
    > install a heatsink fan.
    >
    > Ive typically been using a standard non magnetised screwdriver in the

    past,
    > but am thinking about using a magnetised screwdriver to remove and

    install
    > the motherboard in and out of the case.
    >
    > I know static electricity is a danger but will the manget effect of the
    > screwdriver stuff up my A7N8X Delkuxe?
    >
    > thanks in advance
    >
    > Eyman
    >
    >
     
    Margaret Wilson, Jul 11, 2003
    #3
  4. Eyman

    OldfartJC Guest

    Re: Using a Magnetised Screwdriver on a Motherboard

    I use only magnetized screwdrivers and have been using them for 39 years on
    every computer and peripheral that I have ever worked on and those number in
    the thousands, and I've never had a problem. The only time I don't use one
    is when the screws are stainless steel and then I use special screw
    starters. They won't harm a hard drive when you are just installing it.
    Someday take an old bad hard drive apart and you would be surprised at the
    magnets inside some of them and how strong they are.
    "Margaret Wilson" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I've never used anything but a magnetized screwdriver, and I've built so
    > many machines I've lost count. No problems, ever. And I've even used

    this
    > same screwdriver to mount hard drives. The tip does not have a very

    strong
    > magnetic field though.
    >
    > Regards,
    >
    > Margaret
    >
    > "Eyman" <> wrote in message
    > news:bel12c$6dltk$-berlin.de...
    > > Hi,
    > >
    > > Im about to remove my A7N8X Deluxe motherboard from my computer case to
    > > install a heatsink fan.
    > >
    > > Ive typically been using a standard non magnetised screwdriver in the

    > past,
    > > but am thinking about using a magnetised screwdriver to remove and

    > install
    > > the motherboard in and out of the case.
    > >
    > > I know static electricity is a danger but will the manget effect of the
    > > screwdriver stuff up my A7N8X Delkuxe?
    > >
    > > thanks in advance
    > >
    > > Eyman
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    OldfartJC, Jul 11, 2003
    #4
  5. Eyman

    Nom Guest

    Re: Using a Magnetised Screwdriver on a Motherboard

    "Papa" <> wrote in message
    news:2FpPa.41056$...
    > Not a good idea, and neither are electric screwdrivers.


    Both are fine. I'm an IT Technician by trade, and we use both at work. Never
    had a problem.
     
    Nom, Jul 11, 2003
    #5
  6. Eyman

    Papa Guest

    Re: Using a Magnetised Screwdriver on a Motherboard

    That's why I build my own. As I said, not a good idea - and the reason so
    many commercially assembled assembled systems get returned for repairs so
    soon after purchase.

    "* * Chas" < (remove spamski to e-mail me)> wrote in
    message news:WwtPa.193$...
    > Almost all commercially assembled computers are put together
    > with electric screwdrivers using magnetic bits... IBM, HP,
    > SUN, Dell and all of the others.
    > --
    > Chas. (Drop spamski to E-mail
    > me)
    >
    > "Papa" <> wrote in message
    > news:2FpPa.41056$
    > t...
    > > Not a good idea, and neither are electric screwdrivers.
    > >
    > > I've been trying to find a set of the early design

    > screwdrivers that have
    > > the little clip for holding the screw head, but they seem

    > to have
    > > disappeared from the market. Anyone know a source? Thanks.
    > >

    >
    >
    >
    >
     
    Papa, Jul 11, 2003
    #6
  7. Eyman

    Papa Guest

    Re: Using a Magnetised Screwdriver on a Motherboard

    The reason electric screwdrivers and magnetic screwdrivers are used at tech
    support departments and at computer assembly companies is because managers
    insist on it. Why? Because repairs and assemblies go faster that way, and if
    the tools cause a problem - then the repair or assembly can be done over
    again (using replacement parts, if necessary).

    The OP is a computer owner. He/she does not have the luxury of taking such
    risks, and why should she/he? It only takes a few minutes longer to use the
    RIGHT tools.

    "Nom" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "Papa" <> wrote in message
    > news:2FpPa.41056$...
    > > Not a good idea, and neither are electric screwdrivers.

    >
    > Both are fine. I'm an IT Technician by trade, and we use both at work.

    Never
    > had a problem.
    >
    >
     
    Papa, Jul 11, 2003
    #7
  8. Eyman

    Roger Zoul Guest

    Re: Using a Magnetised Screwdriver on a Motherboard

    Papa wrote:
    :: The reason electric screwdrivers and magnetic screwdrivers are used
    :: at tech support departments and at computer assembly companies is
    :: because managers insist on it. Why? Because repairs and assemblies
    :: go faster that way, and if the tools cause a problem - then the
    :: repair or assembly can be done over again (using replacement parts,
    :: if necessary).
    ::
    :: The OP is a computer owner. He/she does not have the luxury of
    :: taking such risks, and why should she/he? It only takes a few
    :: minutes longer to use the RIGHT tools.
    ::

    You don't state a single good reason why one cannot use these tools
    successfully with just a little care. Please.



    :: "Nom" <> wrote in message
    :: news:...
    ::: "Papa" <> wrote in message
    ::: news:2FpPa.41056$...
    :::: Not a good idea, and neither are electric screwdrivers.
    :::
    ::: Both are fine. I'm an IT Technician by trade, and we use both at
    ::: work. Never had a problem.
     
    Roger Zoul, Jul 11, 2003
    #8
  9. Re: Using a Magnetised Screwdriver on a Motherboard

    Same here. You can secure hard drive screws with a magnetic screwdriver
    with no trouble; I've done it hundreds of times.
     
    JonnyCab®, Jul 11, 2003
    #9
  10. Eyman

    Tony Hwang Guest

    Re: Using a Magnetised Screwdriver on a Motherboard

    Hi,
    With variable speed.
    Tony

    * * Chas wrote:

    > Almost all commercially assembled computers are put together
    > with electric screwdrivers using magnetic bits... IBM, HP,
    > SUN, Dell and all of the others.
    > --
    > Chas. (Drop spamski to E-mail
    > me)
    >
    > "Papa" <> wrote in message
    > news:2FpPa.41056$
    > t...
    >
    >>Not a good idea, and neither are electric screwdrivers.
    >>
    >>I've been trying to find a set of the early design

    >
    > screwdrivers that have
    >
    >>the little clip for holding the screw head, but they seem

    >
    > to have
    >
    >>disappeared from the market. Anyone know a source? Thanks.
    >>

    >
    >
    >
    >
     
    Tony Hwang, Jul 11, 2003
    #10
  11. Eyman

    stanmc Guest

    Eyman wrote:

    > Hi,
    >
    > Im about to remove my A7N8X Deluxe motherboard from my computer case to
    > install a heatsink fan.
    >
    > Ive typically been using a standard non magnetised screwdriver in the past,
    > but am thinking about using a magnetised screwdriver to remove and install
    > the motherboard in and out of the case.
    >
    > I know static electricity is a danger but will the manget effect of the
    > screwdriver stuff up my A7N8X Delkuxe?
    >
    > thanks in advance
    >
    > Eyman
    >
    >

    Back in the old days (1981-1982) we didn't use magnetic screwdrivers
    when working on computers because of all the diskettes. That was of
    course when repairing them at the desk of the user. I can't imagine that
    if you only touched the screws with it and didn't lay it on the
    motherboard there would be any problem. The idea of the screwdriver with
    the fingers that held onto the screw would be fantastic. The number of
    times I've had to chase after screws that dropped down into the case
    when installing things is quite huge. I sure wish the people who design
    computers would pay more attention to the effort it takes to assemble
    them because of their choices in securing things.
     
    stanmc, Jul 11, 2003
    #11
  12. Eyman

    Papa Guest

    Re: Using a Magnetised Screwdriver on a Motherboard

    Obviously your vocabulary as about as low as your intelligence.
     
    Papa, Jul 11, 2003
    #12
  13. Eyman

    Papa Guest

    Re: Using a Magnetised Screwdriver on a Motherboard

    The single good reason is RISK. Why take it? A regular screwdriver does the
    job easily, and with NO risk.

    As for electric screwdrivers, I wouldn't use them even if there was no risk.
    They are too bulky for the tight places inside a PC, and if you drop it -
    the mobo or whatever is going to suffer.

    "Roger Zoul" <> wrote in message
    news:bemgu3$6u2n7$-berlin.de...
    >
    > You don't state a single good reason why one cannot use these tools
    > successfully with just a little care. Please.
    >
    >
     
    Papa, Jul 11, 2003
    #13
  14. Eyman

    Papa Guest

    And where are those screwdrivers (the ones with the fingers)? I haven't seen
    one in years.

    "stanmc" <> wrote in message news:vTAPa.15464
    > Back in the old days (1981-1982) we didn't use magnetic screwdrivers
    > when working on computers because of all the diskettes. That was of
    > course when repairing them at the desk of the user. I can't imagine that
    > if you only touched the screws with it and didn't lay it on the
    > motherboard there would be any problem. The idea of the screwdriver with
    > the fingers that held onto the screw would be fantastic. The number of
    > times I've had to chase after screws that dropped down into the case
    > when installing things is quite huge. I sure wish the people who design
    > computers would pay more attention to the effort it takes to assemble
    > them because of their choices in securing things.
    >
    >
     
    Papa, Jul 11, 2003
    #14
  15. Eyman

    rstlne Guest

    Re: Using a Magnetised Screwdriver on a Motherboard

    > The reason electric screwdrivers and magnetic screwdrivers are used at
    tech
    > support departments and at computer assembly companies is because managers
    > insist on it. Why? Because repairs and assemblies go faster that way, and

    if
    > the tools cause a problem - then the repair or assembly can be done over
    > again (using replacement parts, if necessary).
    >
    > The OP is a computer owner. He/she does not have the luxury of taking such
    > risks, and why should she/he? It only takes a few minutes longer to use

    the
    > RIGHT tools.


    What's better, Dropping the screw and picking it up off of the board with
    your fingers
    or using a magnetic screwdriver
    I dont use them myself (god bless the correct size screwdrivers, did you
    know the screws will hold if you have the correct size)..
    but I cant see any reason why it would harm anyhting on the computer, I
    mean.... How can it harm anything?
     
    rstlne, Jul 11, 2003
    #15
  16. Re: Using a Magnetised Screwdriver on a Motherboard

    Papa wrote:
    >
    > Obviously your vocabulary as about as low as your intelligence.


    Rebut, or stop whining. Simply stating there's "risk" without defining
    or justifying the statement is proof by assertion.

    Or in layman's terms, "pulling it out of your ass".
    --
    Mike
     
    Michael Richmann, Jul 11, 2003
    #16
  17. Eyman

    Papa Guest

    Re: Using a Magnetised Screwdriver on a Motherboard

    You obviously missed my other post. Here it is again.

    "The single good reason is RISK. Why take it? A regular screwdriver does the
    job easily, and with NO risk."

    If you don't understand such a basic attribute of electronics, get a clue
    and look it up. I don't intend to be your teacher.

    Other than that, YOU are the one doing the whining - and you are whining
    because you can't handle the truth - made even clearer by your resorting to
    low level language. Do you always do that when you whine? Tsk. Tsk.
     
    Papa, Jul 11, 2003
    #17
  18. Eyman

    Ted K Guest

    A little OT, but...
    I couldn't find magnetized screwdrivers at HomeDepot, but I did find a
    nifty little gadget that will both magnetized a screwdriver tip and
    demagnitize it.

    It's made by General Tools Mfg (NYC, NY) and sells for about $3.00.
    After using a driver, I demagnitize it so I don't inadvertently grab a
    magnetized one when I shouldn't be using it.

    For anyone interested in how it works: It is about a one inch cube
    with a hole through the middle. Magnitize by inserting the tip of the
    driver and withdrawing it. To demag pull the driver blade back and
    forth several times in the grooves on the top of the cube.

    Works for me.

    Ted

    On Fri, 11 Jul 2003 10:41:05 +1000, "Eyman" <> wrote:

    >Hi,
    >
    >Im about to remove my A7N8X Deluxe motherboard from my computer case to
    >install a heatsink fan.
    >
    >Ive typically been using a standard non magnetised screwdriver in the past,
    >but am thinking about using a magnetised screwdriver to remove and install
    >the motherboard in and out of the case.
    >
    >I know static electricity is a danger but will the manget effect of the
    >screwdriver stuff up my A7N8X Delkuxe?
    >
    >thanks in advance
    >
    >Eyman
    >
     
    Ted K, Jul 11, 2003
    #18
  19. Eyman

    LeeBos Guest

    I have used a lightly magnetized screwdriver for building PC's since 1991
    without ever a problem. Use one of the cubes you mentioned to magnetize it.
    Just as an experiment I waved it all over a 3+1/2 floppy, then ran Norton Disk
    Doctor with a full surface scan and found no problems.
     
    LeeBos, Jul 12, 2003
    #19
  20. Re: Using a Magnetised Screwdriver on a Motherboard

    Papa wrote:
    >
    > You obviously missed my other post. Here it is again.
    >
    > "The single good reason is RISK. Why take it? A regular screwdriver does the
    > job easily, and with NO risk."


    This does not constitute proof that a magnetic screwdriver is a
    problem. I'm still waiting...

    > If you don't understand such a basic attribute of electronics, get a clue
    > and look it up. I don't intend to be your teacher.


    DOSTranslation: I still can't prove it, sez Papa.

    >
    > Other than that, YOU are the one doing the whining - and you are whining
    > because you can't handle the truth - made even clearer by your resorting to
    > low level language. Do you always do that when you whine? Tsk. Tsk.



    I'll say it again: put up or shutup. Otherwise, you're *still* pulling
    it from your ass.

    --
    Mike
     
    Michael Richmann, Jul 12, 2003
    #20
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