Problem registerig ocx through windows logon script

Discussion in 'Windows XP Setup' started by Neil, Sep 28, 2007.

  1. Neil

    Neil Guest

    I am developing an Access 2000 app that uses the Microsoft Rich Textbox
    control. I asked the system administrator to add the line to register the
    OCX to each user's Windows login script, as follows:

    regsvr32 "c:\windows\system32\richtx32.ocx" /s

    Today I had a user update to the new version for testing, but he couldn't
    run it. I then had him run the regsvr32 command from Start | Run, and it
    cleared up the problem. So, apparently, the above line in his logon script
    didn't do the job of registering the control. (The user was running Windows
    XP -- and most machines are on XP.)

    So I notified the system admin, and he checked that person's machine, and
    said that everything was in order. He didn't know why the control didn't
    register.

    So I'm stumped. Any ideas why the above line didn't work to register the ocx
    on this person's machine, but he had to run the command manually?

    Thanks,

    Neil
     
    Neil, Sep 28, 2007
    #1
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  2. Neil

    Alex Dybenko Guest

    Hi,
    you don't need to register ocx at logon, you need to this only once and
    under administrator account.

    --
    Best regards,
    ___________
    Alex Dybenko (MVP)
    http://alexdyb.blogspot.com
    http://www.PointLtd.com

    "Neil" <> wrote in message
    news:HF_Ki.1401$...
    >I am developing an Access 2000 app that uses the Microsoft Rich Textbox
    > control. I asked the system administrator to add the line to register the
    > OCX to each user's Windows login script, as follows:
    >
    > regsvr32 "c:\windows\system32\richtx32.ocx" /s
    >
    > Today I had a user update to the new version for testing, but he couldn't
    > run it. I then had him run the regsvr32 command from Start | Run, and it
    > cleared up the problem. So, apparently, the above line in his logon script
    > didn't do the job of registering the control. (The user was running
    > Windows
    > XP -- and most machines are on XP.)
    >
    > So I notified the system admin, and he checked that person's machine, and
    > said that everything was in order. He didn't know why the control didn't
    > register.
    >
    > So I'm stumped. Any ideas why the above line didn't work to register the
    > ocx
    > on this person's machine, but he had to run the command manually?
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Neil
    >
    >
    >
     
    Alex Dybenko, Sep 28, 2007
    #2
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  3. Neil

    Neil Guest

    I understand that you only need to do it once; but we felt that this was a
    simple way to make sure that everyone was registered, even if it was done
    multiple times.

    So, the questions remain:

    1) Should it work under the Windows logon (even if it is unnecessary to do
    it multiple times), using the below command?

    2) And, if so, then why did it not work, but only worked when the user
    manually ran the command using Start | Run?

    Thanks for your assistance!

    Neil

    "Alex Dybenko" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi,
    > you don't need to register ocx at logon, you need to this only once and
    > under administrator account.
    >
    > --
    > Best regards,
    > ___________
    > Alex Dybenko (MVP)
    > http://alexdyb.blogspot.com
    > http://www.PointLtd.com
    >
    > "Neil" <> wrote in message
    > news:HF_Ki.1401$...
    >>I am developing an Access 2000 app that uses the Microsoft Rich Textbox
    >> control. I asked the system administrator to add the line to register the
    >> OCX to each user's Windows login script, as follows:
    >>
    >> regsvr32 "c:\windows\system32\richtx32.ocx" /s
    >>
    >> Today I had a user update to the new version for testing, but he couldn't
    >> run it. I then had him run the regsvr32 command from Start | Run, and it
    >> cleared up the problem. So, apparently, the above line in his logon
    >> script
    >> didn't do the job of registering the control. (The user was running
    >> Windows
    >> XP -- and most machines are on XP.)
    >>
    >> So I notified the system admin, and he checked that person's machine, and
    >> said that everything was in order. He didn't know why the control didn't
    >> register.
    >>
    >> So I'm stumped. Any ideas why the above line didn't work to register the
    >> ocx
    >> on this person's machine, but he had to run the command manually?
    >>
    >> Thanks,
    >>
    >> Neil
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
     
    Neil, Sep 28, 2007
    #3
  4. Neil

    Alex Dybenko Guest

    1 - should work, if user is administrator. you can remove /s switch to check
    this.

    Still recommend to do this only once during setup.


    --
    Best regards,
    ___________
    Alex Dybenko (MVP)
    http://alexdyb.blogspot.com
    http://www.PointLtd.com

    "Neil" <> wrote in message
    news:We3Li.1768$...
    >I understand that you only need to do it once; but we felt that this was a
    >simple way to make sure that everyone was registered, even if it was done
    >multiple times.
    >
    > So, the questions remain:
    >
    > 1) Should it work under the Windows logon (even if it is unnecessary to do
    > it multiple times), using the below command?
    >
    > 2) And, if so, then why did it not work, but only worked when the user
    > manually ran the command using Start | Run?
    >
    > Thanks for your assistance!
    >
    > Neil
    >
    > "Alex Dybenko" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Hi,
    >> you don't need to register ocx at logon, you need to this only once and
    >> under administrator account.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Best regards,
    >> ___________
    >> Alex Dybenko (MVP)
    >> http://alexdyb.blogspot.com
    >> http://www.PointLtd.com
    >>
    >> "Neil" <> wrote in message
    >> news:HF_Ki.1401$...
    >>>I am developing an Access 2000 app that uses the Microsoft Rich Textbox
    >>> control. I asked the system administrator to add the line to register
    >>> the
    >>> OCX to each user's Windows login script, as follows:
    >>>
    >>> regsvr32 "c:\windows\system32\richtx32.ocx" /s
    >>>
    >>> Today I had a user update to the new version for testing, but he
    >>> couldn't
    >>> run it. I then had him run the regsvr32 command from Start | Run, and it
    >>> cleared up the problem. So, apparently, the above line in his logon
    >>> script
    >>> didn't do the job of registering the control. (The user was running
    >>> Windows
    >>> XP -- and most machines are on XP.)
    >>>
    >>> So I notified the system admin, and he checked that person's machine,
    >>> and
    >>> said that everything was in order. He didn't know why the control didn't
    >>> register.
    >>>
    >>> So I'm stumped. Any ideas why the above line didn't work to register the
    >>> ocx
    >>> on this person's machine, but he had to run the command manually?
    >>>
    >>> Thanks,
    >>>
    >>> Neil
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >>

    >
    >
     
    Alex Dybenko, Sep 29, 2007
    #4
  5. Neil

    Neil Guest

    I don't think the user is an administrator. But, as noted, they were able to
    run the command through Start | Run.

    So, is that the way it should be: if user is not an administrator, the
    command in the logon script will not work, but the user will be able to run
    it through Start | Run?


    "Alex Dybenko" <> wrote in message
    news:%...
    >1 - should work, if user is administrator. you can remove /s switch to
    >check this.
    >
    > Still recommend to do this only once during setup.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Best regards,
    > ___________
    > Alex Dybenko (MVP)
    > http://alexdyb.blogspot.com
    > http://www.PointLtd.com
    >
    > "Neil" <> wrote in message
    > news:We3Li.1768$...
    >>I understand that you only need to do it once; but we felt that this was a
    >>simple way to make sure that everyone was registered, even if it was done
    >>multiple times.
    >>
    >> So, the questions remain:
    >>
    >> 1) Should it work under the Windows logon (even if it is unnecessary to
    >> do it multiple times), using the below command?
    >>
    >> 2) And, if so, then why did it not work, but only worked when the user
    >> manually ran the command using Start | Run?
    >>
    >> Thanks for your assistance!
    >>
    >> Neil
    >>
    >> "Alex Dybenko" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> Hi,
    >>> you don't need to register ocx at logon, you need to this only once and
    >>> under administrator account.
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Best regards,
    >>> ___________
    >>> Alex Dybenko (MVP)
    >>> http://alexdyb.blogspot.com
    >>> http://www.PointLtd.com
    >>>
    >>> "Neil" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:HF_Ki.1401$...
    >>>>I am developing an Access 2000 app that uses the Microsoft Rich Textbox
    >>>> control. I asked the system administrator to add the line to register
    >>>> the
    >>>> OCX to each user's Windows login script, as follows:
    >>>>
    >>>> regsvr32 "c:\windows\system32\richtx32.ocx" /s
    >>>>
    >>>> Today I had a user update to the new version for testing, but he
    >>>> couldn't
    >>>> run it. I then had him run the regsvr32 command from Start | Run, and
    >>>> it
    >>>> cleared up the problem. So, apparently, the above line in his logon
    >>>> script
    >>>> didn't do the job of registering the control. (The user was running
    >>>> Windows
    >>>> XP -- and most machines are on XP.)
    >>>>
    >>>> So I notified the system admin, and he checked that person's machine,
    >>>> and
    >>>> said that everything was in order. He didn't know why the control
    >>>> didn't
    >>>> register.
    >>>>
    >>>> So I'm stumped. Any ideas why the above line didn't work to register
    >>>> the ocx
    >>>> on this person's machine, but he had to run the command manually?
    >>>>
    >>>> Thanks,
    >>>>
    >>>> Neil
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>

    >
     
    Neil, Oct 1, 2007
    #5
  6. Neil

    Alex Dybenko Guest

    Hi,
    actually, if use does not have administrative rights - regsvr32 will fail,
    whatever way you run it

    --
    Best regards,
    ___________
    Alex Dybenko (MVP)
    http://alexdyb.blogspot.com
    http://www.PointLtd.com

    "Neil" <> wrote in message
    news:%wZLi.1301$...
    >I don't think the user is an administrator. But, as noted, they were able
    >to run the command through Start | Run.
    >
    > So, is that the way it should be: if user is not an administrator, the
    > command in the logon script will not work, but the user will be able to
    > run it through Start | Run?
    >
    >
    > "Alex Dybenko" <> wrote in message
    > news:%...
    >>1 - should work, if user is administrator. you can remove /s switch to
    >>check this.
    >>
    >> Still recommend to do this only once during setup.
    >>
    >>
    >> --
    >> Best regards,
    >> ___________
    >> Alex Dybenko (MVP)
    >> http://alexdyb.blogspot.com
    >> http://www.PointLtd.com
    >>
    >> "Neil" <> wrote in message
    >> news:We3Li.1768$...
    >>>I understand that you only need to do it once; but we felt that this was
    >>>a simple way to make sure that everyone was registered, even if it was
    >>>done multiple times.
    >>>
    >>> So, the questions remain:
    >>>
    >>> 1) Should it work under the Windows logon (even if it is unnecessary to
    >>> do it multiple times), using the below command?
    >>>
    >>> 2) And, if so, then why did it not work, but only worked when the user
    >>> manually ran the command using Start | Run?
    >>>
    >>> Thanks for your assistance!
    >>>
    >>> Neil
    >>>
    >>> "Alex Dybenko" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>> Hi,
    >>>> you don't need to register ocx at logon, you need to this only once and
    >>>> under administrator account.
    >>>>
    >>>> --
    >>>> Best regards,
    >>>> ___________
    >>>> Alex Dybenko (MVP)
    >>>> http://alexdyb.blogspot.com
    >>>> http://www.PointLtd.com
    >>>>
    >>>> "Neil" <> wrote in message
    >>>> news:HF_Ki.1401$...
    >>>>>I am developing an Access 2000 app that uses the Microsoft Rich Textbox
    >>>>> control. I asked the system administrator to add the line to register
    >>>>> the
    >>>>> OCX to each user's Windows login script, as follows:
    >>>>>
    >>>>> regsvr32 "c:\windows\system32\richtx32.ocx" /s
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Today I had a user update to the new version for testing, but he
    >>>>> couldn't
    >>>>> run it. I then had him run the regsvr32 command from Start | Run, and
    >>>>> it
    >>>>> cleared up the problem. So, apparently, the above line in his logon
    >>>>> script
    >>>>> didn't do the job of registering the control. (The user was running
    >>>>> Windows
    >>>>> XP -- and most machines are on XP.)
    >>>>>
    >>>>> So I notified the system admin, and he checked that person's machine,
    >>>>> and
    >>>>> said that everything was in order. He didn't know why the control
    >>>>> didn't
    >>>>> register.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> So I'm stumped. Any ideas why the above line didn't work to register
    >>>>> the ocx
    >>>>> on this person's machine, but he had to run the command manually?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Thanks,
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Neil
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >>

    >
    >
     
    Alex Dybenko, Oct 1, 2007
    #6
  7. see http://trigeminal.com/usenet/usenet026.asp?1033

    Declare Function RegRich Lib "richtx32.ocx" Alias "DllRegisterServer" () As
    Long
    should work

    HtH

    Pieter

    "Neil" <> wrote in message
    news:HF_Ki.1401$...
    >I am developing an Access 2000 app that uses the Microsoft Rich Textbox
    > control. I asked the system administrator to add the line to register the
    > OCX to each user's Windows login script, as follows:
    >
    > regsvr32 "c:\windows\system32\richtx32.ocx" /s
    >
    > Today I had a user update to the new version for testing, but he couldn't
    > run it. I then had him run the regsvr32 command from Start | Run, and it
    > cleared up the problem. So, apparently, the above line in his logon script
    > didn't do the job of registering the control. (The user was running
    > Windows
    > XP -- and most machines are on XP.)
    >
    > So I notified the system admin, and he checked that person's machine, and
    > said that everything was in order. He didn't know why the control didn't
    > register.
    >
    > So I'm stumped. Any ideas why the above line didn't work to register the
    > ocx
    > on this person's machine, but he had to run the command manually?
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Neil
    >
    >
    >
     
    Pieter Wijnen, Oct 1, 2007
    #7
  8. Neil <> wrote:
    > I don't think the user is an administrator. But, as noted, they were able to
    > run the command through Start | Run.


    How do you know that, if you used the /s(ilent) switch???
    --
    ..NET: It's About Trust!
    http://vfred.mvps.org
     
    Karl E. Peterson, Oct 1, 2007
    #8
  9. Neil

    Neil Guest

    Didn't use the /s switch with the Start | Run command, only in the login
    script.

    But, regardless, the original point was:

    - command was run through login script; was presumed to have worked
    - user opened form that relied on ocx; got error
    - user ran command through Start | Run (without /s switch); problem was
    resolved.

    Ergo: command worked when run through Start | Run, but not when run through
    login script. Why? User has same rights either way.


    "Karl E. Peterson" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Neil <> wrote:
    >> I don't think the user is an administrator. But, as noted, they were able
    >> to
    >> run the command through Start | Run.

    >
    > How do you know that, if you used the /s(ilent) switch???
    > --
    > .NET: It's About Trust!
    > http://vfred.mvps.org
    >
     
    Neil, Oct 2, 2007
    #9
  10. Neil

    Neil Guest

    Then it's strange that error would go away after the user ran the command
    through Start | Run. If command didn't work through login, then it shouldn't
    have worked through Start | Run.

    "Alex Dybenko" <> wrote in message
    news:Ot2O98$...
    > Hi,
    > actually, if use does not have administrative rights - regsvr32 will fail,
    > whatever way you run it
    >
    > --
    > Best regards,
    > ___________
    > Alex Dybenko (MVP)
    > http://alexdyb.blogspot.com
    > http://www.PointLtd.com
    >
    > "Neil" <> wrote in message
    > news:%wZLi.1301$...
    >>I don't think the user is an administrator. But, as noted, they were able
    >>to run the command through Start | Run.
    >>
    >> So, is that the way it should be: if user is not an administrator, the
    >> command in the logon script will not work, but the user will be able to
    >> run it through Start | Run?
    >>
    >>
    >> "Alex Dybenko" <> wrote in message
    >> news:%...
    >>>1 - should work, if user is administrator. you can remove /s switch to
    >>>check this.
    >>>
    >>> Still recommend to do this only once during setup.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Best regards,
    >>> ___________
    >>> Alex Dybenko (MVP)
    >>> http://alexdyb.blogspot.com
    >>> http://www.PointLtd.com
    >>>
    >>> "Neil" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:We3Li.1768$...
    >>>>I understand that you only need to do it once; but we felt that this was
    >>>>a simple way to make sure that everyone was registered, even if it was
    >>>>done multiple times.
    >>>>
    >>>> So, the questions remain:
    >>>>
    >>>> 1) Should it work under the Windows logon (even if it is unnecessary to
    >>>> do it multiple times), using the below command?
    >>>>
    >>>> 2) And, if so, then why did it not work, but only worked when the user
    >>>> manually ran the command using Start | Run?
    >>>>
    >>>> Thanks for your assistance!
    >>>>
    >>>> Neil
    >>>>
    >>>> "Alex Dybenko" <> wrote in message
    >>>> news:...
    >>>>> Hi,
    >>>>> you don't need to register ocx at logon, you need to this only once
    >>>>> and under administrator account.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> --
    >>>>> Best regards,
    >>>>> ___________
    >>>>> Alex Dybenko (MVP)
    >>>>> http://alexdyb.blogspot.com
    >>>>> http://www.PointLtd.com
    >>>>>
    >>>>> "Neil" <> wrote in message
    >>>>> news:HF_Ki.1401$...
    >>>>>>I am developing an Access 2000 app that uses the Microsoft Rich
    >>>>>>Textbox
    >>>>>> control. I asked the system administrator to add the line to register
    >>>>>> the
    >>>>>> OCX to each user's Windows login script, as follows:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> regsvr32 "c:\windows\system32\richtx32.ocx" /s
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Today I had a user update to the new version for testing, but he
    >>>>>> couldn't
    >>>>>> run it. I then had him run the regsvr32 command from Start | Run, and
    >>>>>> it
    >>>>>> cleared up the problem. So, apparently, the above line in his logon
    >>>>>> script
    >>>>>> didn't do the job of registering the control. (The user was running
    >>>>>> Windows
    >>>>>> XP -- and most machines are on XP.)
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> So I notified the system admin, and he checked that person's machine,
    >>>>>> and
    >>>>>> said that everything was in order. He didn't know why the control
    >>>>>> didn't
    >>>>>> register.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> So I'm stumped. Any ideas why the above line didn't work to register
    >>>>>> the ocx
    >>>>>> on this person's machine, but he had to run the command manually?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Thanks,
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Neil
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>

    >
     
    Neil, Oct 2, 2007
    #10
  11. probably the path to regsrv32 wasn't resolved by the login script command.

    Still better to use RegisterServer in a Startup macro/form, before "all"
    code is loaded
    see http://trigeminal.com/usenet/usenet026.asp?1033 for the how's & why's

    Pieter



    "Neil" <> wrote in message
    news:a_mMi.30557$...
    > Didn't use the /s switch with the Start | Run command, only in the login
    > script.
    >
    > But, regardless, the original point was:
    >
    > - command was run through login script; was presumed to have worked
    > - user opened form that relied on ocx; got error
    > - user ran command through Start | Run (without /s switch); problem was
    > resolved.
    >
    > Ergo: command worked when run through Start | Run, but not when run
    > through login script. Why? User has same rights either way.
    >
    >
    > "Karl E. Peterson" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Neil <> wrote:
    >>> I don't think the user is an administrator. But, as noted, they were
    >>> able to
    >>> run the command through Start | Run.

    >>
    >> How do you know that, if you used the /s(ilent) switch???
    >> --
    >> .NET: It's About Trust!
    >> http://vfred.mvps.org
    >>

    >
    >
     
    Pieter Wijnen, Oct 2, 2007
    #11
  12. Neil

    Neil Guest

    It was the same command either way -- login script or Start | Run. One
    worked, the other didn't.


    "Pieter Wijnen"
    <>
    wrote in message news:%...
    > probably the path to regsrv32 wasn't resolved by the login script command.
    >
    > Still better to use RegisterServer in a Startup macro/form, before "all"
    > code is loaded
    > see http://trigeminal.com/usenet/usenet026.asp?1033 for the how's & why's
    >
    > Pieter
    >
    >
    >
    > "Neil" <> wrote in message
    > news:a_mMi.30557$...
    >> Didn't use the /s switch with the Start | Run command, only in the login
    >> script.
    >>
    >> But, regardless, the original point was:
    >>
    >> - command was run through login script; was presumed to have worked
    >> - user opened form that relied on ocx; got error
    >> - user ran command through Start | Run (without /s switch); problem was
    >> resolved.
    >>
    >> Ergo: command worked when run through Start | Run, but not when run
    >> through login script. Why? User has same rights either way.
    >>
    >>
    >> "Karl E. Peterson" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> Neil <> wrote:
    >>>> I don't think the user is an administrator. But, as noted, they were
    >>>> able to
    >>>> run the command through Start | Run.
    >>>
    >>> How do you know that, if you used the /s(ilent) switch???
    >>> --
    >>> .NET: It's About Trust!
    >>> http://vfred.mvps.org
    >>>

    >>
    >>

    >
    >
     
    Neil, Oct 2, 2007
    #12
  13. The interesting difference would be between running it through a command
    prompt (which the Login script more or less does)
    as oposed through rundll (as Start /Run Does)
    ie fully qualifying the paths for both regsvr32 & the ocx might fix the
    login script problem
    test by unregistering the ocx

    HtH

    Pieter

    "Neil" <> wrote in message
    news:DUnMi.5517$...
    > It was the same command either way -- login script or Start | Run. One
    > worked, the other didn't.
    >
    >
    > "Pieter Wijnen"
    > <>
    > wrote in message news:%...
    >> probably the path to regsrv32 wasn't resolved by the login script
    >> command.
    >>
    >> Still better to use RegisterServer in a Startup macro/form, before "all"
    >> code is loaded
    >> see http://trigeminal.com/usenet/usenet026.asp?1033 for the how's & why's
    >>
    >> Pieter
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> "Neil" <> wrote in message
    >> news:a_mMi.30557$...
    >>> Didn't use the /s switch with the Start | Run command, only in the login
    >>> script.
    >>>
    >>> But, regardless, the original point was:
    >>>
    >>> - command was run through login script; was presumed to have worked
    >>> - user opened form that relied on ocx; got error
    >>> - user ran command through Start | Run (without /s switch); problem was
    >>> resolved.
    >>>
    >>> Ergo: command worked when run through Start | Run, but not when run
    >>> through login script. Why? User has same rights either way.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> "Karl E. Peterson" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>> Neil <> wrote:
    >>>>> I don't think the user is an administrator. But, as noted, they were
    >>>>> able to
    >>>>> run the command through Start | Run.
    >>>>
    >>>> How do you know that, if you used the /s(ilent) switch???
    >>>> --
    >>>> .NET: It's About Trust!
    >>>> http://vfred.mvps.org
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>

    >
    >
     
    Pieter Wijnen, Oct 2, 2007
    #13
  14. "Pieter Wijnen"
    <
    ..with.norway> wrote in message news:#...
    > probably the path to regsrv32 wasn't resolved by the login script command.
    >
    > Still better to use RegisterServer in a Startup macro/form, before "all"
    > code is loaded
    > see http://trigeminal.com/usenet/usenet026.asp?1033 for the how's & why's
    >
    > Pieter
    >
    >
    >
    > "Neil" <> wrote in message
    > news:a_mMi.30557$...
    > > Didn't use the /s switch with the Start | Run command, only in the login
    > > script.
    > >
    > > But, regardless, the original point was:
    > >
    > > - command was run through login script; was presumed to have worked
    > > - user opened form that relied on ocx; got error
    > > - user ran command through Start | Run (without /s switch); problem was
    > > resolved.
    > >
    > > Ergo: command worked when run through Start | Run, but not when run
    > > through login script. Why? User has same rights either way.
    > >
    > >
    > > "Karl E. Peterson" <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > >> Neil <> wrote:
    > >>> I don't think the user is an administrator. But, as noted, they were
    > >>> able to
    > >>> run the command through Start | Run.
    > >>
    > >> How do you know that, if you used the /s(ilent) switch???
    > >> --
    > >> .NET: It's About Trust!
    > >> http://vfred.mvps.org
    > >>

    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    Monique Kawamitsu, Dec 14, 2007
    #14
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