media streaming from router's USB network drive to TV doesn't work

Discussion in 'DIY PC' started by WindowsAssassin, Mar 13, 2012.

  1. Hello,

    Media streaming of video files on my pc via the wireless router to my
    TV works well using Windows Media Player with media streaming enabled.

    However, when I copy these exact same video files to an external hard
    drive that is attached to the router via USB, I can see the video
    files on my TV but the names are greyed out and I cannot select them
    to play on the TV, as if the file format is not supported.

    Why is this? The purpose of copying the video files to the external
    drive is that I want to be able to stream and watch video's on my TV
    without the need to have my pc turned on.

    I have:
    Windows 7 Ultimate x64
    Windows Media Player 12
    Maxtor external hard drive connected to router via USB
    Linksys WRT610N simultaneous dual band router
    Home cinema that supports DLNA

    Thanks for the help
     
    WindowsAssassin, Mar 13, 2012
    #1
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  2. WindowsAssassin

    Paul Guest

    Re: media streaming from router's USB network drive to TV doesn'twork

    WindowsAssassin wrote:
    > Hello,
    >
    > Media streaming of video files on my pc via the wireless router to my
    > TV works well using Windows Media Player with media streaming enabled.
    >
    > However, when I copy these exact same video files to an external hard
    > drive that is attached to the router via USB, I can see the video
    > files on my TV but the names are greyed out and I cannot select them
    > to play on the TV, as if the file format is not supported.
    >
    > Why is this? The purpose of copying the video files to the external
    > drive is that I want to be able to stream and watch video's on my TV
    > without the need to have my pc turned on.
    >
    > I have:
    > Windows 7 Ultimate x64
    > Windows Media Player 12
    > Maxtor external hard drive connected to router via USB
    > Linksys WRT610N simultaneous dual band router
    > Home cinema that supports DLNA
    >
    > Thanks for the help


    The suggestion in the bottom post in this thread, is to check whether
    the PC can see the Linksys and access streamed content from the
    WRT610N, using Windows Media Player. That would at least prove whether
    the WRT610N recognizes the media folder you declared in the setup screen,
    and has completed its scan and built a list of media to share.

    http://homecommunity.cisco.com/t5/Wireless-Routers/wrt610N-and-streaming-media-to-a-360/td-p/219986

    There is a V1 and a V2 version of the WRT610N, which further complicates
    any problems they might have. Maybe the V2 has different problems than
    the V1.

    I suppose the TV might actually have started to stream the content,
    checked the format of the video coming across, and decided it wasn't
    supported, and that's why it is grayed out. Try testing with a "trivial"
    movie format, if you can. Decompress one of your H.264 files and
    convert to avi or something, and see if the TV likes that over Wifi.

    Paul
     
    Paul, Mar 14, 2012
    #2
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  3. WindowsAssassin

    Flasherly Guest

    On Mar 13, 4:23 pm, WindowsAssassin <> wrote:
    > Hello,
    >
    > Media streaming of video files on my pc via the wireless router to my
    > TV works well using Windows Media Player with media streaming enabled.
    >
    > However, when I copy these exact same video files to an external hard
    > drive that is attached to the router via USB, I can see the video
    > files on my TV but the names are greyed out and I cannot select them
    > to play on the TV, as if the file format is not supported.
    >
    > Why is this? The purpose of copying the video files to the external
    > drive is that I want to be able to stream and watch video's on my TV
    > without the need to have my pc turned on.


    I'm not sure how the flat panel relates to a digital video storage
    medium. The flat panel contains a tuner for two or three expected
    video broadcasting standard, besides a couple extra connects as means
    to serve a computer display. There is no such thing as plugging in a
    hard disk directly into a monitor. Such a "box," however containing
    or supportive of a digital video storage (USB, HD, memory, or optical
    disc media), to be so must meet a very generalized and open standard
    provided by panel display manufacturers. Further, to as well define
    your router within such specifications, as a video broadcasting
    device, exceeds how routers are defined. There are tons of such,
    boxes dedicated to relaying video output from common stream encodes.
    A router, though, to such an end tends to be dedicated to proprietary
    services propagating in-house encryption to specialized services and
    contracts. Also bear in mind a few years ago when European
    commonwealth interests intersected with Microsoft in a law suit.
    Microsoft lost within terms characterized industrially as a setback.
    The crux of the case, as I understand, concerned Windows Media
    Player. Have you considered watching with another player, besides
    Microsoft's, one as well adaptable to your "router," perhaps, more or
    less for the implicit convenience?
     
    Flasherly, Mar 14, 2012
    #3
  4. WindowsAssassin

    GMAN Guest

    In article <>, Flasherly <> wrote:
    >On Mar 13, 4:23 pm, WindowsAssassin <> wrote:
    >> Hello,
    >>
    >> Media streaming of video files on my pc via the wireless router to my
    >> TV works well using Windows Media Player with media streaming enabled.
    >>
    >> However, when I copy these exact same video files to an external hard
    >> drive that is attached to the router via USB, I can see the video
    >> files on my TV but the names are greyed out and I cannot select them
    >> to play on the TV, as if the file format is not supported.
    >>
    >> Why is this? The purpose of copying the video files to the external
    >> drive is that I want to be able to stream and watch video's on my TV
    >> without the need to have my pc turned on.

    >
    >I'm not sure how the flat panel relates to a digital video storage
    >medium. The flat panel contains a tuner for two or three expected
    >video broadcasting standard, besides a couple extra connects as means
    >to serve a computer display. There is no such thing as plugging in a
    >hard disk directly into a monitor. Such a "box," however containing
    >or supportive of a digital video storage (USB, HD, memory, or optical
    >disc media), to be so must meet a very generalized and open standard
    >provided by panel display manufacturers. Further, to as well define
    >your router within such specifications, as a video broadcasting
    >device, exceeds how routers are defined. There are tons of such,
    >boxes dedicated to relaying video output from common stream encodes.
    >A router, though, to such an end tends to be dedicated to proprietary
    >services propagating in-house encryption to specialized services and
    >contracts. Also bear in mind a few years ago when European
    >commonwealth interests intersected with Microsoft in a law suit.
    >Microsoft lost within terms characterized industrially as a setback.
    >The crux of the case, as I understand, concerned Windows Media
    >Player. Have you considered watching with another player, besides
    >Microsoft's, one as well adaptable to your "router," perhaps, more or
    >less for the implicit convenience?


    Jesus Christ professor, instead of making zero sense, why dont you direct the
    man to http://www.dlna.org/

    That generalized and open standard you speak of is called DNLA!!! and its not
    provided by the panel makers, its standards agreed upon by the indutry.

    http://www.dlna.
    org/dlna-for-industry/about-dlna-corporate-history/member-companies


    Many TV;s nowadays have DLNA capabilities built into them. And the router he
    has is supposed to stream video and audio from his wireless router directly to
    his TV from a USB attached drive plugged directly into his router.

    Did you do too much LSD back in the day???? Becuase what you type makes no
    sense to anybody here.
     
    GMAN, Mar 14, 2012
    #4
  5. WindowsAssassin

    Ting Hsu Guest

    On Mar 13, 4:23 pm, WindowsAssassin <> wrote:
    > Linksys WRT610N simultaneous dual band router
    > Home cinema that supports DLNA


    According to the user guide, this router does not actually stream
    anything; it can store files, not stream them. You need an external
    media player to stream. Nearly all routers that claim to be "media
    streaming routers" have this same problem - they only store files, not
    stream them.
    http://homedownloads.cisco.com/downloads/userguide/WRT610N_V20_UG_NC-WEB.pdf

    In addition, it is obvious that your TV does not have a media player
    built into it. I cannot tell for sure, since you neglected to mention
    the make/model of your TV, but that's my guess.

    Thus you need a media player somewhere on your network, which means
    your choices are...

    1. Buy a media playing device, like a Boxee Box, or
    2. Build a media playing device, like an HTPC (home theater PC), or
    3. Hack an XBox360 or Apple TV with XBMC (a media playing app), or
    4. Buy an internet ready TV that can play common video formats (I
    would bring a video on a usb drive to test it in the store). As you
    now know, not all internet ready TVs support playback of video files.
    --
    // T.Hsu
     
    Ting Hsu, Mar 14, 2012
    #5
  6. WindowsAssassin

    Guest

    On Wednesday, 14 March 2012 23:57:33 UTC+1, Ting Hsu wrote:
    > On Mar 13, 4:23 pm, WindowsAssassin <> wrote:
    > > Linksys WRT610N simultaneous dual band router
    > > Home cinema that supports DLNA

    >
    > According to the user guide, this router does not actually stream
    > anything; it can store files, not stream them. You need an external
    > media player to stream. Nearly all routers that claim to be "media
    > streaming routers" have this same problem - they only store files, not
    > stream them.
    > http://homedownloads.cisco.com/downloads/userguide/WRT610N_V20_UG_NC-WEB.pdf
    >
    > In addition, it is obvious that your TV does not have a media player
    > built into it. I cannot tell for sure, since you neglected to mention
    > the make/model of your TV, but that's my guess.
    >
    > Thus you need a media player somewhere on your network, which means
    > your choices are...
    >
    > 1. Buy a media playing device, like a Boxee Box, or
    > 2. Build a media playing device, like an HTPC (home theater PC), or
    > 3. Hack an XBox360 or Apple TV with XBMC (a media playing app), or
    > 4. Buy an internet ready TV that can play common video formats (I
    > would bring a video on a usb drive to test it in the store). As you
    > now know, not all internet ready TVs support playback of video files.
    > --
    > // T.Hsu


    In Windows Media Player I can see at the left under the topic "Other libraries" "PVConnect (WRT610N)". This refers to my external hard drive that's connected to the WRT610N router. This is streamed wirelessly to my Blu-ray home cinema (model Panasonic SC-BT230) that has a USB WiFi dongle plugged in.In it's menu I then select the DLNA Network where I get a list of devices that contains 2 entries. One for my pc that can stream music, videos and photos via Windows Media Player's Library. And another device that's listed as WRT610N which is my external hard drive connected to the router.

    @Ting Hsu: You say my router doesn't stream anything. But page 3 from the manual from your link says "The built-in media server streams music, video and photos from the attached storage device to any UPnP-compatible media adapter"

    So I copied different video file types onto the external hard drive now to test. An MP4, 2 AVI's, and an MPG video file. All are greyed out except forthe MPG which streams and plays fine on my tv. Note that the other video files stream fine as well but from my pc to the tv and not from the usb drive.
     
    , Mar 15, 2012
    #6
  7. WindowsAssassin

    Flasherly Guest

    On Mar 14, 4:03 pm, (GMAN) wrote:
    >
    > Jesus Christ professor, instead of making zero sense, why dont you direct the
    > man to http://www.dlna.org/
    >
    > That generalized and open standard you speak of is called DNLA!!! and its not
    > provided by the panel makers, its standards agreed upon by the indutry.
    >
    > http://www.dlna.
    > org/dlna-for-industry/about-dlna-corporate-history/member-companies
    >
    > Many TV;s nowadays have DLNA capabilities built into them. And the router he
    > has is supposed to stream video and audio from his wireless router directly to
    > his TV from a USB attached drive plugged directly into his router.
    >
    > Did you do too much LSD back in the day???? Becuase what you type makes no
    > sense to anybody here.
    > .


    Amazing, I suppose, perhaps you then should realize there exists a
    corporate membership. I had, although only couched in allusions,
    referred to that membership in a sense of 'in-house and proprietary'
    cases. But, I think I do see where ignoring a triviality associated
    with facts, those I didn't care more closely to inspect or specify,
    apparently have transgressed past all a meaning I did convey for a sum
    impact of affected ingratiation you're sharing with me. Very well.
    Might we then attempt to follow this line of reasoning, were I to
    further, openly to submit, a) nothing other than Windows Media Player
    will play with such devices, and, b) how should you to react to a
    prior suspicion, in point of fact, I may already have sensed to know
    prior this, viz in that very supposition I stated prior, that another
    player, apart from Microsoft's, first be [dis]qualified? I sincerely
    hope, beyond Jesus Christ, LSD, and the greater academia, by now I
    will have provided some precious means to that modicum you wish to
    share with all. . . . By Zeus my dear man, go for it!
     
    Flasherly, Mar 15, 2012
    #7
  8. WindowsAssassin

    Peter Guest

    In article <CX58r.120144$1.easynews.com>,
    says...
    > In article <>, Flasherly <> wrote:
    > >On Mar 13, 4:23 pm, WindowsAssassin <> wrote:
    > >> Hello,
    > >>
    > >> Media streaming of video files on my pc via the wireless router to my
    > >> TV works well using Windows Media Player with media streaming enabled.
    > >>
    > >> However, when I copy these exact same video files to an external hard
    > >> drive that is attached to the router via USB, I can see the video
    > >> files on my TV but the names are greyed out and I cannot select them
    > >> to play on the TV, as if the file format is not supported.
    > >>
    > >> Why is this? The purpose of copying the video files to the external
    > >> drive is that I want to be able to stream and watch video's on my TV
    > >> without the need to have my pc turned on.

    > >


    Sorry, I'm a bit behind on the discussion. Does the TV support playing
    of media files directly without any other external media player being
    required to play those files? Have you confirmed this works? Does the TV
    have USB to allow a direct connection to test this out?

    --
    Pete Ives
    Remove All_stRESS before sending me an email
     
    Peter, Mar 15, 2012
    #8
  9. WindowsAssassin

    Flasherly Guest

    On Mar 15, 5:23 am, Peter <>
    wrote:
    >
    > Sorry, I'm a bit behind on the discussion. Does the TV support playing
    > of media files directly without any other external media player being
    > required to play those files? Have you confirmed this works? Does the TV
    > have USB to allow a direct connection to test this out?


    Probably not. There's only a few such concoctions floating around
    with chipped decoder circuitry for maybe premier service provider
    contracts. Stuff like Sony Entertainment with the corporate umph
    behind it to make it fly. Not the sorts of things apt to be found in
    Wallymart. Last I looked their likes require service distribution
    centers to agree to pricing contracts before they can carry the
    brands. Hence the convenience takes they play about adding it "your
    cart" before knowing how much they're into "your wallet" -- of course
    requiring that cart first be registered. Let the advertising games
    begin anew. Like my new car with a base model requirement in
    collusion with Sirius XM satellite streaming, or the $1000 pressure
    system monitor off batteries installed into tire valve stems.
    Lobbyists hard at work safely insuring four 10-cent battery
    replacements are factory certified at an additional $500. Curious if
    Cisco is now chipping routers with an interplay off Microsoft's newest
    media offerings.
     
    Flasherly, Mar 15, 2012
    #9
  10. WindowsAssassin

    GMAN Guest

    In article <>, Ting Hsu <> wrote:
    >On Mar 13, 4:23=A0pm, WindowsAssassin <> wrote:
    >> Linksys WRT610N simultaneous dual band router
    >> Home cinema that supports DLNA

    >
    >According to the user guide, this router does not actually stream
    >anything; it can store files, not stream them. You need an external
    >media player to stream. Nearly all routers that claim to be "media
    >streaming routers" have this same problem - they only store files, not
    >stream them.
    >http://homedownloads.cisco.com/downloads/userguide/WRT610N_V20_UG_NC-WEB.pd=
    >f
    >
    >In addition, it is obvious that your TV does not have a media player
    >built into it. I cannot tell for sure, since you neglected to mention
    >the make/model of your TV, but that's my guess.
    >
    >Thus you need a media player somewhere on your network, which means
    >your choices are...
    >
    >1. Buy a media playing device, like a Boxee Box, or
    >2. Build a media playing device, like an HTPC (home theater PC), or
    >3. Hack an XBox360 or Apple TV with XBMC (a media playing app), or
    >4. Buy an internet ready TV that can play common video formats (I
    >would bring a video on a usb drive to test it in the store). As you
    >now know, not all internet ready TVs support playback of video files.



    The WRT610N has a built in uPnP/DNLA media server, but you have to turn the
    feature on in the router



    http://www6.nohold.net/Cisco2/ukp.
    aspx?vw=1&docid=d6dc548e38a24088b760cfa3fb190797_17403.xml&pid=96&slnid=3


    The OP needs to read chapter 3 of the owners manual and it tells you how to
    setup the server in the router

    http://homedownloads.cisco.com/downloads/userguide/WRT610N_V20_UG_NC-WEB.pdf
     
    GMAN, Mar 15, 2012
    #10
  11. WindowsAssassin

    GMAN Guest

    In article <>, Peter <> wrote:
    >In article <CX58r.120144$1.easynews.com>,
    > says...
    >> In article

    > <>, Flasherly
    > <> wrote:
    >> >On Mar 13, 4:23 pm, WindowsAssassin <> wrote:
    >> >> Hello,
    >> >>
    >> >> Media streaming of video files on my pc via the wireless router to my
    >> >> TV works well using Windows Media Player with media streaming enabled.
    >> >>
    >> >> However, when I copy these exact same video files to an external hard
    >> >> drive that is attached to the router via USB, I can see the video
    >> >> files on my TV but the names are greyed out and I cannot select them
    >> >> to play on the TV, as if the file format is not supported.
    >> >>
    >> >> Why is this? The purpose of copying the video files to the external
    >> >> drive is that I want to be able to stream and watch video's on my TV
    >> >> without the need to have my pc turned on.
    >> >

    >
    >Sorry, I'm a bit behind on the discussion. Does the TV support playing
    >of media files directly without any other external media player being
    >required to play those files? Have you confirmed this works? Does the TV
    >have USB to allow a direct connection to test this out?
    >


    google "DLNA"


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_Living_Network_Alliance

    Pretty much the standard all media players follow today
     
    GMAN, Mar 15, 2012
    #11
  12. WindowsAssassin

    GMAN Guest

    In article <>, Flasherly <> wrote:
    >On Mar 15, 5:23 am, Peter <>
    >wrote:
    >>
    >> Sorry, I'm a bit behind on the discussion. Does the TV support playing
    >> of media files directly without any other external media player being
    >> required to play those files? Have you confirmed this works? Does the TV
    >> have USB to allow a direct connection to test this out?

    >
    >Probably not. There's only a few such concoctions floating around
    >with chipped decoder circuitry for maybe premier service provider
    >contracts. Stuff like Sony Entertainment with the corporate umph
    >behind it to make it fly. Not the sorts of things apt to be found in
    >Wallymart. Last I looked their likes require service distribution
    >centers to agree to pricing contracts before they can carry the
    >brands. Hence the convenience takes they play about adding it "your
    >cart" before knowing how much they're into "your wallet" -- of course
    >requiring that cart first be registered. Let the advertising games
    >begin anew. Like my new car with a base model requirement in
    >collusion with Sirius XM satellite streaming, or the $1000 pressure
    >system monitor off batteries installed into tire valve stems.
    >Lobbyists hard at work safely insuring four 10-cent battery
    >replacements are factory certified at an additional $500. Curious if
    >Cisco is now chipping routers with an interplay off Microsoft's newest
    >media offerings.



    OMG, most decent Tv's,blu ray players, gaming devices have DNLA capabilities
    now.
     
    GMAN, Mar 15, 2012
    #12
  13. WindowsAssassin

    Ting Hsu Guest

    Wow, lots and lots of misinformation on this topic, enough that it
    seems that I'm the only one who has ever streamed video to my TV
    without a PC involved.

    The DLNA specifies 3 things: a server, a renderer, and a controller.

    You need all three parts to actually view a video file on your TV.

    But here's the rub: you only need 1 part to be compliant with DLNA.

    In the original poster's set up, the one that worked, here's what the
    3 parts were.

    Server = Router with USB hard drive
    Renderer = Windows Media Player on his PC
    Controller = TV

    The original poster assumed that if he got rid of the "renderer", that
    everything would just magically work, because everything was DLNA
    compliant. But the router is only compatible with the "server" part of
    the DLNA and the TV is only compatible with the "controller" part of
    the DLNA. He still needs the "renderer" part in order for everything
    to work (and his router ain't it; in fact, I don't know of a single
    router that can do the "renderer" portion of the DLNA).

    The most common way to get a standalone "renderer" is to build, buy,
    or hack a device to provide it. On the buy side, just look up Boxee
    Box or WD TV Live as your starting points.
    --
    // T.Hsu
     
    Ting Hsu, Mar 15, 2012
    #13
  14. WindowsAssassin

    Guest

    On Thursday, 15 March 2012 19:26:27 UTC+1, GMAN wrote:
    > In article <>, Ting Hsu <> wrote:
    > >On Mar 13, 4:23=A0pm, WindowsAssassin <> wrote:
    > >> Linksys WRT610N simultaneous dual band router
    > >> Home cinema that supports DLNA

    > >
    > >According to the user guide, this router does not actually stream
    > >anything; it can store files, not stream them. You need an external
    > >media player to stream. Nearly all routers that claim to be "media
    > >streaming routers" have this same problem - they only store files, not
    > >stream them.
    > >http://homedownloads.cisco.com/downloads/userguide/WRT610N_V20_UG_NC-WEB.pd=
    > >f
    > >
    > >In addition, it is obvious that your TV does not have a media player
    > >built into it. I cannot tell for sure, since you neglected to mention
    > >the make/model of your TV, but that's my guess.
    > >
    > >Thus you need a media player somewhere on your network, which means
    > >your choices are...
    > >
    > >1. Buy a media playing device, like a Boxee Box, or
    > >2. Build a media playing device, like an HTPC (home theater PC), or
    > >3. Hack an XBox360 or Apple TV with XBMC (a media playing app), or
    > >4. Buy an internet ready TV that can play common video formats (I
    > >would bring a video on a usb drive to test it in the store). As you
    > >now know, not all internet ready TVs support playback of video files.

    >
    >
    > The WRT610N has a built in uPnP/DNLA media server, but you have to turn the
    > feature on in the router
    >
    >
    >
    > http://www6.nohold.net/Cisco2/ukp.
    > aspx?vw=1&docid=d6dc548e38a24088b760cfa3fb190797_17403.xml&pid=96&slnid=3
    >
    >
    > The OP needs to read chapter 3 of the owners manual and it tells you how to
    > setup the server in the router
    >
    > http://homedownloads.cisco.com/downloads/userguide/WRT610N_V20_UG_NC-WEB.pdf


    The UPnP Media Server is enabled in the web based configuration page of my router. I also formatted the hard drive from there (the router needs it to be FAT32) and then created a folder and scanned the folder from the router webpage.
     
    , Mar 15, 2012
    #14
  15. WindowsAssassin

    Flasherly Guest

    On Mar 15, 2:32 pm, (GMAN) wrote:
    >
    > OMG, most decent Tv's,blu ray players, gaming devices have DNLA capabilities
    > now.


    Yea -- I hear you, although there's something indecent about DNLA that
    stinks to me. It's all digital streams variously for processing, so
    adding another connection and support chip for the TeeVee, another
    BRay or game box stacked beside or on top a computer -- they're
    negating the computer for, lo & behold, sector specific niches of
    dedicated in-house subscription equipment. . . .Bah, and bugger 'em
    bloody by the scores. Duplicating with lesser equipment what a
    decent computer should be able to better achieve. Never spent anything
    more than needed just for hardware, know most *all* the freeware
    counterparts among useful software, quit games long time ago, no
    teevee other than a seldom used aerial, though I do still shop at
    Walmart, which is still, of sorts, an indecent place. I wasn't always
    this way, of course; just had to work hard at it.

    -
    They don't get that way for nothing. -Old Greek proverb.
     
    Flasherly, Mar 15, 2012
    #15
  16. WindowsAssassin

    Flasherly Guest

    On Mar 14, 8:05 pm, wrote:

    >
    > So I copied different video file types onto the external hard drive now to test. An MP4, 2 AVI's, and an MPG video file. All are greyed out except for the MPG which streams and plays fine on my tv. Note that the other videofiles stream fine as well but from my pc to the tv and not from the usb drive.


    Yep. That figures: surprise, surprise <NOT> MPEG2 is the IS <industry
    standard> for broadcasting satellite streams, least last I looked.
     
    Flasherly, Mar 15, 2012
    #16
  17. WindowsAssassin

    Paul Guest

    Re: media streaming from router's USB network drive to TV doesn'twork

    wrote:
    > On Thursday, 15 March 2012 19:26:27 UTC+1, GMAN wrote:
    >> In article <>, Ting Hsu <> wrote:
    >>> On Mar 13, 4:23=A0pm, WindowsAssassin <> wrote:
    >>>> Linksys WRT610N simultaneous dual band router
    >>>> Home cinema that supports DLNA
    >>> According to the user guide, this router does not actually stream
    >>> anything; it can store files, not stream them. You need an external
    >>> media player to stream. Nearly all routers that claim to be "media
    >>> streaming routers" have this same problem - they only store files, not
    >>> stream them.
    >>> http://homedownloads.cisco.com/downloads/userguide/WRT610N_V20_UG_NC-WEB.pd=
    >>> f
    >>>
    >>> In addition, it is obvious that your TV does not have a media player
    >>> built into it. I cannot tell for sure, since you neglected to mention
    >>> the make/model of your TV, but that's my guess.
    >>>
    >>> Thus you need a media player somewhere on your network, which means
    >>> your choices are...
    >>>
    >>> 1. Buy a media playing device, like a Boxee Box, or
    >>> 2. Build a media playing device, like an HTPC (home theater PC), or
    >>> 3. Hack an XBox360 or Apple TV with XBMC (a media playing app), or
    >>> 4. Buy an internet ready TV that can play common video formats (I
    >>> would bring a video on a usb drive to test it in the store). As you
    >>> now know, not all internet ready TVs support playback of video files.

    >>
    >> The WRT610N has a built in uPnP/DNLA media server, but you have to turn the
    >> feature on in the router
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> http://www6.nohold.net/Cisco2/ukp.
    >> aspx?vw=1&docid=d6dc548e38a24088b760cfa3fb190797_17403.xml&pid=96&slnid=3
    >>
    >>
    >> The OP needs to read chapter 3 of the owners manual and it tells you how to
    >> setup the server in the router
    >>
    >> http://homedownloads.cisco.com/downloads/userguide/WRT610N_V20_UG_NC-WEB.pdf

    >
    > The UPnP Media Server is enabled in the web based configuration page of my router. I also formatted the hard drive from there (the router needs it to be FAT32) and then created a folder and scanned the folder from the router webpage.


    So if I'm following all this now, you've succeeded in getting one format,
    to play from WRT610N to TV, the MPG video file.

    Now, have you cracked open the TV spec, to see what it mentions in the
    way of movie file formats ?

    I checked a thread just now, and the TV in their example, had a
    chart of formats. The claim in the thread, is DLNA narrows
    down the scope of uPnP, and so not a lot of formats are
    supported. So this is the kind of chart you're looking for in
    the TV manual.

    http://i397.photobucket.com/albums/pp60/samsung_hd_tech/Page82.jpg

    The thread I saw is here. And the person who provided that page from
    a manual, claims you have to match the details pretty exactly, for
    it to work.

    http://forums.cnet.com/7723-13973_102-322838/dlna-formats-supported/

    Paul
     
    Paul, Mar 16, 2012
    #17
  18. WindowsAssassin

    Rodney Pont Guest

    On Thu, 15 Mar 2012 16:33:42 -0700 (PDT), wrote:

    >The UPnP Media Server is enabled in the web based configuration page of my router. I also formatted the hard drive from there (the router needs it to be FAT32) and then created a folder and scanned the folder from the router webpage.


    It sounds like you need to convert the files to a format that your TV
    understands using something like avs4you <http://www.avs4you.com>.

    --
    Regards - Rodney Pont
    The from address exists but is mostly dumped,
    please send any emails to the address below
    e-mail rpont (at) gmail (dot) com
     
    Rodney Pont, Mar 16, 2012
    #18
  19. WindowsAssassin

    Guest

    On Friday, 16 March 2012 01:18:29 UTC+1, Paul wrote:
    > wrote:
    > > On Thursday, 15 March 2012 19:26:27 UTC+1, GMAN wrote:
    > >> In article <>, Ting Hsu <> wrote:
    > >>> On Mar 13, 4:23=A0pm, WindowsAssassin <> wrote:
    > >>>> Linksys WRT610N simultaneous dual band router
    > >>>> Home cinema that supports DLNA
    > >>> According to the user guide, this router does not actually stream
    > >>> anything; it can store files, not stream them. You need an external
    > >>> media player to stream. Nearly all routers that claim to be "media
    > >>> streaming routers" have this same problem - they only store files, not
    > >>> stream them.
    > >>> http://homedownloads.cisco.com/downloads/userguide/WRT610N_V20_UG_NC-WEB.pd=
    > >>> f
    > >>>
    > >>> In addition, it is obvious that your TV does not have a media player
    > >>> built into it. I cannot tell for sure, since you neglected to mention
    > >>> the make/model of your TV, but that's my guess.
    > >>>
    > >>> Thus you need a media player somewhere on your network, which means
    > >>> your choices are...
    > >>>
    > >>> 1. Buy a media playing device, like a Boxee Box, or
    > >>> 2. Build a media playing device, like an HTPC (home theater PC), or
    > >>> 3. Hack an XBox360 or Apple TV with XBMC (a media playing app), or
    > >>> 4. Buy an internet ready TV that can play common video formats (I
    > >>> would bring a video on a usb drive to test it in the store). As you
    > >>> now know, not all internet ready TVs support playback of video files.
    > >>
    > >> The WRT610N has a built in uPnP/DNLA media server, but you have to turn the
    > >> feature on in the router
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> http://www6.nohold.net/Cisco2/ukp.
    > >> aspx?vw=1&docid=d6dc548e38a24088b760cfa3fb190797_17403.xml&pid=96&slnid=3
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> The OP needs to read chapter 3 of the owners manual and it tells you how to
    > >> setup the server in the router
    > >>
    > >> http://homedownloads.cisco.com/downloads/userguide/WRT610N_V20_UG_NC-WEB.pdf

    > >
    > > The UPnP Media Server is enabled in the web based configuration page ofmy router. I also formatted the hard drive from there (the router needs itto be FAT32) and then created a folder and scanned the folder from the router webpage.

    >
    > So if I'm following all this now, you've succeeded in getting one format,
    > to play from WRT610N to TV, the MPG video file.
    >
    > Now, have you cracked open the TV spec, to see what it mentions in the
    > way of movie file formats ?
    >
    > I checked a thread just now, and the TV in their example, had a
    > chart of formats. The claim in the thread, is DLNA narrows
    > down the scope of uPnP, and so not a lot of formats are
    > supported. So this is the kind of chart you're looking for in
    > the TV manual.
    >
    > http://i397.photobucket.com/albums/pp60/samsung_hd_tech/Page82.jpg
    >
    > The thread I saw is here. And the person who provided that page from
    > a manual, claims you have to match the details pretty exactly, for
    > it to work.
    >
    > http://forums.cnet.com/7723-13973_102-322838/dlna-formats-supported/
    >
    > Paul




    On Friday, 16 March 2012 01:18:29 UTC+1, Paul wrote:
    > wrote:
    > > On Thursday, 15 March 2012 19:26:27 UTC+1, GMAN wrote:
    > >> In article <>, Ting Hsu <> wrote:
    > >>> On Mar 13, 4:23=A0pm, WindowsAssassin <> wrote:
    > >>>> Linksys WRT610N simultaneous dual band router
    > >>>> Home cinema that supports DLNA
    > >>> According to the user guide, this router does not actually stream
    > >>> anything; it can store files, not stream them. You need an external
    > >>> media player to stream. Nearly all routers that claim to be "media
    > >>> streaming routers" have this same problem - they only store files, not
    > >>> stream them.
    > >>> http://homedownloads.cisco.com/downloads/userguide/WRT610N_V20_UG_NC-WEB.pd=
    > >>> f
    > >>>
    > >>> In addition, it is obvious that your TV does not have a media player
    > >>> built into it. I cannot tell for sure, since you neglected to mention
    > >>> the make/model of your TV, but that's my guess.
    > >>>
    > >>> Thus you need a media player somewhere on your network, which means
    > >>> your choices are...
    > >>>
    > >>> 1. Buy a media playing device, like a Boxee Box, or
    > >>> 2. Build a media playing device, like an HTPC (home theater PC), or
    > >>> 3. Hack an XBox360 or Apple TV with XBMC (a media playing app), or
    > >>> 4. Buy an internet ready TV that can play common video formats (I
    > >>> would bring a video on a usb drive to test it in the store). As you
    > >>> now know, not all internet ready TVs support playback of video files.
    > >>
    > >> The WRT610N has a built in uPnP/DNLA media server, but you have to turn the
    > >> feature on in the router
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> http://www6.nohold.net/Cisco2/ukp.
    > >> aspx?vw=1&docid=d6dc548e38a24088b760cfa3fb190797_17403.xml&pid=96&slnid=3
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> The OP needs to read chapter 3 of the owners manual and it tells you how to
    > >> setup the server in the router
    > >>
    > >> http://homedownloads.cisco.com/downloads/userguide/WRT610N_V20_UG_NC-WEB.pdf

    > >
    > > The UPnP Media Server is enabled in the web based configuration page ofmy router. I also formatted the hard drive from there (the router needs itto be FAT32) and then created a folder and scanned the folder from the router webpage.

    >
    > So if I'm following all this now, you've succeeded in getting one format,
    > to play from WRT610N to TV, the MPG video file.
    >
    > Now, have you cracked open the TV spec, to see what it mentions in the
    > way of movie file formats ?
    >
    > I checked a thread just now, and the TV in their example, had a
    > chart of formats. The claim in the thread, is DLNA narrows
    > down the scope of uPnP, and so not a lot of formats are
    > supported. So this is the kind of chart you're looking for in
    > the TV manual.
    >
    > http://i397.photobucket.com/albums/pp60/samsung_hd_tech/Page82.jpg
    >
    > The thread I saw is here. And the person who provided that page from
    > a manual, claims you have to match the details pretty exactly, for
    > it to work.
    >
    > http://forums.cnet.com/7723-13973_102-322838/dlna-formats-supported/
    >
    > Paul




    On Friday, 16 March 2012 01:18:29 UTC+1, Paul wrote:
    > wrote:
    > > On Thursday, 15 March 2012 19:26:27 UTC+1, GMAN wrote:
    > >> In article <>, Ting Hsu <> wrote:
    > >>> On Mar 13, 4:23=A0pm, WindowsAssassin <> wrote:
    > >>>> Linksys WRT610N simultaneous dual band router
    > >>>> Home cinema that supports DLNA
    > >>> According to the user guide, this router does not actually stream
    > >>> anything; it can store files, not stream them. You need an external
    > >>> media player to stream. Nearly all routers that claim to be "media
    > >>> streaming routers" have this same problem - they only store files, not
    > >>> stream them.
    > >>> http://homedownloads.cisco.com/downloads/userguide/WRT610N_V20_UG_NC-WEB.pd=
    > >>> f
    > >>>
    > >>> In addition, it is obvious that your TV does not have a media player
    > >>> built into it. I cannot tell for sure, since you neglected to mention
    > >>> the make/model of your TV, but that's my guess.
    > >>>
    > >>> Thus you need a media player somewhere on your network, which means
    > >>> your choices are...
    > >>>
    > >>> 1. Buy a media playing device, like a Boxee Box, or
    > >>> 2. Build a media playing device, like an HTPC (home theater PC), or
    > >>> 3. Hack an XBox360 or Apple TV with XBMC (a media playing app), or
    > >>> 4. Buy an internet ready TV that can play common video formats (I
    > >>> would bring a video on a usb drive to test it in the store). As you
    > >>> now know, not all internet ready TVs support playback of video files.
    > >>
    > >> The WRT610N has a built in uPnP/DNLA media server, but you have to turn the
    > >> feature on in the router
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> http://www6.nohold.net/Cisco2/ukp.
    > >> aspx?vw=1&docid=d6dc548e38a24088b760cfa3fb190797_17403.xml&pid=96&slnid=3
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> The OP needs to read chapter 3 of the owners manual and it tells you how to
    > >> setup the server in the router
    > >>
    > >> http://homedownloads.cisco.com/downloads/userguide/WRT610N_V20_UG_NC-WEB.pdf

    > >
    > > The UPnP Media Server is enabled in the web based configuration page ofmy router. I also formatted the hard drive from there (the router needs itto be FAT32) and then created a folder and scanned the folder from the router webpage.

    >
    > So if I'm following all this now, you've succeeded in getting one format,
    > to play from WRT610N to TV, the MPG video file.
    >
    > Now, have you cracked open the TV spec, to see what it mentions in the
    > way of movie file formats ?
    >
    > I checked a thread just now, and the TV in their example, had a
    > chart of formats. The claim in the thread, is DLNA narrows
    > down the scope of uPnP, and so not a lot of formats are
    > supported. So this is the kind of chart you're looking for in
    > the TV manual.
    >
    > http://i397.photobucket.com/albums/pp60/samsung_hd_tech/Page82.jpg
    >
    > The thread I saw is here. And the person who provided that page from
    > a manual, claims you have to match the details pretty exactly, for
    > it to work.
    >
    > http://forums.cnet.com/7723-13973_102-322838/dlna-formats-supported/
    >
    > Paul




    On Friday, 16 March 2012 01:18:29 UTC+1, Paul wrote:
    > wrote:
    > > On Thursday, 15 March 2012 19:26:27 UTC+1, GMAN wrote:
    > >> In article <>, Ting Hsu <> wrote:
    > >>> On Mar 13, 4:23=A0pm, WindowsAssassin <> wrote:
    > >>>> Linksys WRT610N simultaneous dual band router
    > >>>> Home cinema that supports DLNA
    > >>> According to the user guide, this router does not actually stream
    > >>> anything; it can store files, not stream them. You need an external
    > >>> media player to stream. Nearly all routers that claim to be "media
    > >>> streaming routers" have this same problem - they only store files, not
    > >>> stream them.
    > >>> http://homedownloads.cisco.com/downloads/userguide/WRT610N_V20_UG_NC-WEB.pd=
    > >>> f
    > >>>
    > >>> In addition, it is obvious that your TV does not have a media player
    > >>> built into it. I cannot tell for sure, since you neglected to mention
    > >>> the make/model of your TV, but that's my guess.
    > >>>
    > >>> Thus you need a media player somewhere on your network, which means
    > >>> your choices are...
    > >>>
    > >>> 1. Buy a media playing device, like a Boxee Box, or
    > >>> 2. Build a media playing device, like an HTPC (home theater PC), or
    > >>> 3. Hack an XBox360 or Apple TV with XBMC (a media playing app), or
    > >>> 4. Buy an internet ready TV that can play common video formats (I
    > >>> would bring a video on a usb drive to test it in the store). As you
    > >>> now know, not all internet ready TVs support playback of video files.
    > >>
    > >> The WRT610N has a built in uPnP/DNLA media server, but you have to turn the
    > >> feature on in the router
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> http://www6.nohold.net/Cisco2/ukp.
    > >> aspx?vw=1&docid=d6dc548e38a24088b760cfa3fb190797_17403.xml&pid=96&slnid=3
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> The OP needs to read chapter 3 of the owners manual and it tells you how to
    > >> setup the server in the router
    > >>
    > >> http://homedownloads.cisco.com/downloads/userguide/WRT610N_V20_UG_NC-WEB.pdf

    > >
    > > The UPnP Media Server is enabled in the web based configuration page ofmy router. I also formatted the hard drive from there (the router needs itto be FAT32) and then created a folder and scanned the folder from the router webpage.

    >
    > So if I'm following all this now, you've succeeded in getting one format,
    > to play from WRT610N to TV, the MPG video file.
    >
    > Now, have you cracked open the TV spec, to see what it mentions in the
    > way of movie file formats ?
    >
    > I checked a thread just now, and the TV in their example, had a
    > chart of formats. The claim in the thread, is DLNA narrows
    > down the scope of uPnP, and so not a lot of formats are
    > supported. So this is the kind of chart you're looking for in
    > the TV manual.
    >
    > http://i397.photobucket.com/albums/pp60/samsung_hd_tech/Page82.jpg
    >
    > The thread I saw is here. And the person who provided that page from
    > a manual, claims you have to match the details pretty exactly, for
    > it to work.
    >
    > http://forums.cnet.com/7723-13973_102-322838/dlna-formats-supported/
    >
    > Paul


    Right, so to summarise: streaming avi from running pc with windows media player streaming turned on to the tv works fine. Then, when I copy those sameavi files onto a portable hard disk that is attached to my router's usb port, my tv cannot play the avi's anymore (greyed out). The hard disk is formatted using the router's webpage and a shared folder has been enabled as well as media server. My tv can see the shared media but cannot play it. EXCEPT if I copy an mpg onto the disk, this plays fine. I'm totally confused and a total noob about this. If they tell me the router and tv and so on support UPnP and media sharing and usb hard drives and sh*t, I get pissed when it doesn't play the media.

    I might have overlooked stuff since I'm just not into this stuff but I can't find any info such as "beware, beware, you cannot play avi files with this device", neither in the router's manual and neither in the tv manual.

    The only chart you talked about I found is page 8 in the blu-ray manual:
    http://service.us.panasonic.com/OPERMANPDF/SCBT730.PDF
    I don't know why the f**k this is but in this english manual there is no DivX while in my paper manual there is DivX for DVD and BD. Hell, I don't even know where to look anymore, do you look in the tv manual, the blu-ray player manual, the router manual, does it have something to do with codecs on my pc or windows media player, my external disk,...

    All this technology and gimmicks will ultimately lead to the decay and fallof our western civilisation, just like the roman empire went down.
     
    , Mar 16, 2012
    #19
  20. WindowsAssassin

    Paul Guest

    Re: media streaming from router's USB network drive to TV doesn'twork

    wrote:

    >
    > Right, so to summarise: streaming avi from running pc with windows media player
    > streaming turned on to the tv works fine. Then, when I copy those same avi files
    > onto a portable hard disk that is attached to my router's usb port, my tv cannot
    > play the avi's anymore (greyed out). The hard disk is formatted using the router's
    > webpage and a shared folder has been enabled as well as media server. My tv can
    > see the shared media but cannot play it. EXCEPT if I copy an mpg onto the disk,
    > this plays fine. I'm totally confused and a total noob about this. If they tell
    > me the router and tv and so on support UPnP and media sharing and usb hard drives
    > and sh*t, I get pissed when it doesn't play the media.
    >
    > I might have overlooked stuff since I'm just not into this stuff but I can't find
    > any info such as "beware, beware, you cannot play avi files with this device",
    > neither in the router's manual and neither in the tv manual.
    >
    > The only chart you talked about I found is page 8 in the blu-ray manual:
    > http://service.us.panasonic.com/OPERMANPDF/SCBT730.PDF
    > I don't know why the f**k this is but in this english manual there is no DivX
    > while in my paper manual there is DivX for DVD and BD. Hell, I don't even know
    > where to look anymore, do you look in the tv manual, the blu-ray player manual,
    > the router manual, does it have something to do with codecs on my pc or windows
    > media player, my external disk,...
    >
    > All this technology and gimmicks will ultimately lead to the decay and fall of
    > our western civilisation, just like the roman empire went down.


    I always think in terms of the client/server model. One device is a server, the
    other is a client. Both have limited intelligence, and sometimes, not even the
    manual does justice to the subject. For example, your router won't eat an NTFS
    disk drive, and goes with FAT32. And has the usual size limit as well. I don't
    think it can accept a 2TB drive. The limit is likely a bit less than that.
    I've seen that kind of limit on some NAS boxes, but I'm hard pressed to
    explain the number. When a NAS box says "200GB limit", I just throw my hands
    in the air, because there is *no* capacity limit in the designs, at the
    200GB point. Or at 500GB, or 750GB for that matter. The only capacity
    limits I'm aware of, are at 137GB (48bitLBA) and 2.2TB (32 bit sector number).

    In this case, both the router and the TV have manuals. The router manual,
    is going to acknowledge what formats the router will scan and present
    in a menu to other devices. The router is a server, but it may not "stream"
    any old thing it finds. If it found a copy of the US Constitution on the
    hard drive, it's going to take a pass on that and not bother. Eventually,
    after it "scans" the folder, it's ready to pass a "menu" to the other machine.

    The client has two interests. It wants to see the "menu", kinda like the
    equivalent of a "dir" or "list directory" command. But it's also going
    to want to know what kind of movies they are. I presume the "scanning"
    the router does, is to classify the movies. The TV will only have certain
    licensed codecs in its bag of tools, and the formats supported are going
    to be Hollywood formats. So if some Linux guy comes up with something
    called "ogg", even though "ogg" is free, the TV is going to laugh at
    that format. Maybe the TV company paid $1 for an mp4 license and the
    ability to use a codec for it. They're going to want to handle whatever
    movie format comes on a DVD, that kind of thing. They're not trying to
    build an "all purpose jukebox" in the TV. And apparently, DLNA attempts
    to do that, pointing to a limited set of formats as targets for the
    client and server. The router isn't DLNA, so may be a bit more open
    ended on formats, but you say your TV is DLNA.

    If your computer and Windows Media Player, are able to play all the
    content, then the router ("server") is able to successfully serve the
    movies. If the TV won't touch the meal its served, then we need to
    crack the TV manual, as I stated before.

    Please provide either the TV make and model, or the URL of the TV
    manual itself. There's got to be a table in there, similar to the
    example I dug up. If not, the table of formats is floating around
    on the Internet, and when you post the make and model, we can look
    it up.

    Paul
     
    Paul, Mar 16, 2012
    #20
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