Hard drive help needed

Discussion in 'DIY PC' started by Charlie Hoffpauir, Sep 22, 2011.

  1. My daughter has an old Win 98 computer that she was trying to get some
    data from. She has no backup (she's a lawyer, so I suspect that's part
    of the problem) and the computer wouldn't boot up. So I removed the
    HD. It's an old Seagate, 3 GB, ST33220A. I connected it (PATA
    interface) and tried to read the data, without success. Windows will
    see it, but won't read anything from it and properties reports zero
    size. I'm hoping that it's just the boot tracks that are messed up and
    that the data on it is still OK.... but have no clue as to how to get
    to the data. I'd appreciate any suggestions.
     
    Charlie Hoffpauir, Sep 22, 2011
    #1
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  2. Charlie Hoffpauir

    GMAN Guest

    In article <>, Charlie Hoffpauir <> wrote:
    >My daughter has an old Win 98 computer that she was trying to get some
    >data from. She has no backup (she's a lawyer, so I suspect that's part
    >of the problem) and the computer wouldn't boot up. So I removed the
    >HD. It's an old Seagate, 3 GB, ST33220A. I connected it (PATA
    >interface) and tried to read the data, without success. Windows will
    >see it, but won't read anything from it and properties reports zero
    >size. I'm hoping that it's just the boot tracks that are messed up and
    >that the data on it is still OK.... but have no clue as to how to get
    >to the data. I'd appreciate any suggestions.



    Easus partition master free home edition should work.

    http://www.partition-tool.com/personal.htm













    http://www.partition-tool.com/partition-recovery-wizard/recover-lost-partition.
    htm

    Whether partition can be recognized by system or not depends on the partition
    table. If partition table is destroyed by virus or deleted accidentally, you
    will not see the partition you need. But in fact, you can use Partition
    Recovery Wizard built in EaseUS Partition Master to recover deleted or lost
    partitions.
     
    GMAN, Sep 22, 2011
    #2
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  3. Charlie Hoffpauir

    Guest

    On Sep 22, 1:48 pm, Charlie Hoffpauir <> wrote:
    > My daughter has an old Win 98 computer that she was trying to get some
    > data from. She has no backup (she's a lawyer, so I suspect that's part
    > of the problem) and the computer wouldn't boot up. So I removed the
    > HD. It's an old Seagate, 3 GB, ST33220A. I connected it (PATA
    > interface) and tried to read the data, without success. Windows will
    > see it, but won't read anything from it and properties reports zero
    > size. I'm hoping that it's just the boot tracks that are messed up and
    > that the data on it is still OK.... but have no clue as to how to get
    > to the data. I'd appreciate any suggestions.


    Duplicate the disk now. Never work with the source when trying to
    recover data.
     
    , Sep 22, 2011
    #3
  4. Charlie Hoffpauir

    Guest

    Charlie Hoffpauir <> wrote:
    > My daughter has an old Win 98 computer that she was trying to get some
    > data from. She has no backup (she's a lawyer, so I suspect that's part
    > of the problem)


    Becoming a lawyer without knowing enough to have data backups suggests
    political correctness has something to do with it.
     
    , Sep 22, 2011
    #4
  5. Charlie Hoffpauir

    Flasherly Guest

    On Sep 22, 2:48 pm, Charlie Hoffpauir <> wrote:
    > My daughter has an old Win 98 computer that she was trying to get some
    > data from. She has no backup (she's a lawyer, so I suspect that's part
    > of the problem) and the computer wouldn't boot up. So I removed the
    > HD. It's an old Seagate, 3 GB, ST33220A. I connected it (PATA
    > interface) and tried to read the data, without success. Windows will
    > see it, but won't read anything from it and properties reports zero
    > size. I'm hoping that it's just the boot tracks that are messed up and
    > that the data on it is still OK.... but have no clue as to how to get
    > to the data. I'd appreciate any suggestions.


    Easus has saved my butt with NTFS turning to jello, as it invariably
    will if the system is treated roughly or thrown curveballs. With
    FAT16/20/32 you've a wider range of software diagnostics, a "chance"
    of coherent and extant cross-links, but that's a 3G drive and so
    ancient I'm having trouble placing it within reference to the last
    ancient 800Meg drives I bought. Maybe somewhere around an IBM drive
    in a 800Mhz Athlon that went bad on someone perhaps similarly
    whining. Actually, damn near crying. It took me literally hours and
    several reboots. I got it to "limp along" transferring data off to a
    new drive I installed in between the system locking up. Real pain in
    the butt. With the guy I was doing it for asking inane questions all
    the while. Eventually I told him it might help to stand on the table
    and try pissing on the computer. Which made him very mad and he
    exploded. Oh, well. He does know one thing now, though, that there's
    value in backups he now keeps. That and to think twice before asking
    just any question. There's a lot of software utilities, but if it
    boils down to hardware-level recovery, it'll take specialists and
    disassembling the HD for substituting equipment to recover the data
    from standalone platters. Fees and labor up front with no guarantee
    past reputation and an honest try.
     
    Flasherly, Sep 23, 2011
    #5
  6. Charlie Hoffpauir

    Paul Guest

    Charlie Hoffpauir wrote:
    > My daughter has an old Win 98 computer that she was trying to get some
    > data from. She has no backup (she's a lawyer, so I suspect that's part
    > of the problem) and the computer wouldn't boot up. So I removed the
    > HD. It's an old Seagate, 3 GB, ST33220A. I connected it (PATA
    > interface) and tried to read the data, without success. Windows will
    > see it, but won't read anything from it and properties reports zero
    > size. I'm hoping that it's just the boot tracks that are messed up and
    > that the data on it is still OK.... but have no clue as to how to get
    > to the data. I'd appreciate any suggestions.


    I agree with the backup sentiment.

    What I'd do, is connect the drive to my desktop, boot a Linux LiveCD, and
    "dd" the 3GB (if it will all read) and store it somewhere safe. First
    attempt would be a plain "dd" command, available in any Linux.

    dd if=/dev/hda of=/media/WINXP/downloads/savemybutt.dd

    On my machine, my C: partition has a label of "WINXP", and when
    Linux runs and I click on the disk icon, my C: drive becomes /media/WINXP.

    That command assumes you're using an NTFS partition, because many times
    the disk being copied, is larger than the 4GB limit of FAT32. Modern Linux
    distros can handle NTFS, so you can save the resulting file on the main hard
    drive. Since in your case, the image of the disk is only 3GB in size, it
    would even fit on a FAT32 partition which has a 4GB max file size. Normally,
    I'd be making sure the destination was an NTFS partition, because the file
    would be larger than that.

    Once you have some kind of sector by sector backup copy, you can experiment all
    you want with the lawyer's data. You can put the image back later, if you
    make a mistake.

    dd if=/media/WINXP/downloads/savemybutt.dd of=/dev/hda

    Part of the fun, is figuring out whether /dev/hda is the 3GB disk or not.
    Disks have many potential names, and doing "ls /dev" might hint at the name.
    For example, if the disk had one partition, I might see /dev/hda and /dev/hda1,
    with the latter being the first partition, and the former being the whole disk.
    Since both of my current hard drives, have four primary partitions each, I
    end up with at least ten entries in /dev that look interesting.

    *******

    If the disk has "bad spots", there is a suggestion here.

    http://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/Damaged_Hard_Disk

    ./ddrescue -n /dev/old_disk /dev/new_disk rescued.log
    ./ddrescue -r 1 /dev/old_disk /dev/new_disk rescued.log

    What that special version does, is keep track of what it can read
    and what it can't read. The first pass is quick, and picks up most
    of the (easily read) data, while the second pass tries a bit harder
    to fill in the gaps. Any sectors which can't be read, are replaced
    with zeros, so as far as I know, the output size should still be
    the same, even if data is missing. This approach is reserved for
    stuff you're about to send off to a $$$Data_Recovery firm, where you
    want to keep as much as possible locally, before sending off the disk.

    If there wasn't a special approach available, and the disk spent 15 seconds
    for each bad sector, and the disk was terabyte sized, a copy attempt
    might never finish. That's why at some point, if you notice a "bad spot"
    when trying to make your backup copy, then the status of the disk
    changes measurably, from "probably just some little thing" to "shit,
    I gonna lose the whole thing".

    Paul
     
    Paul, Sep 23, 2011
    #6
  7. Charlie Hoffpauir

    GMAN Guest

    In article <>, wrote:
    >On Sep 22, 1:48=A0pm, Charlie Hoffpauir <> wrote:
    >> My daughter has an old Win 98 computer that she was trying to get some
    >> data from. She has no backup (she's a lawyer, so I suspect that's part
    >> of the problem) and the computer wouldn't boot up. So I removed the
    >> HD. It's an old Seagate, 3 GB, ST33220A. I connected it (PATA
    >> interface) and tried to read the data, without success. Windows will
    >> see it, but won't read anything from it and properties reports zero
    >> size. I'm hoping that it's just the boot tracks that are messed up and
    >> that the data on it is still OK.... but have no clue as to how to get
    >> to the data. I'd appreciate any suggestions.

    >
    >Duplicate the disk now. Never work with the source when trying to
    >recover data.

    Cant duplicate it if it cant read any partition info from it.

    Easus recovers them.
     
    GMAN, Sep 23, 2011
    #7
  8. Charlie Hoffpauir

    GMAN Guest

    In article <>, wrote:
    >Charlie Hoffpauir <> wrote:
    >> My daughter has an old Win 98 computer that she was trying to get some
    >> data from. She has no backup (she's a lawyer, so I suspect that's part
    >> of the problem)

    >
    >Becoming a lawyer without knowing enough to have data backups suggests
    >political correctness has something to do with it.



    The Attorney General for the State of Utah came into CompUSA when i worked
    there a decade ago and her personal home computer with alot of her work
    related stuff crashed on her.
     
    GMAN, Sep 23, 2011
    #8
  9. Charlie Hoffpauir

    John Doe Guest

    Winniethepooh 100acrewoods.org (GMAN) wrote:

    > ultraport mail.com wrote:
    >> Charlie Hoffpauir <inva... invalid.com> wrote:


    >>> My daughter has an old Win 98 computer that she was trying to
    >>> get some data from. She has no backup (she's a lawyer, so I
    >>> suspect that's part of the problem) and the computer wouldn't
    >>> boot up. So I removed the HD. It's an old Seagate, 3 GB,
    >>> ST33220A. I connected it (PATA interface) and tried to read
    >>> the data, without success. Windows will see it, but won't read
    >>> anything from it and properties reports zero size. I'm hoping
    >>> that it's just the boot tracks that are messed up and that the
    >>> data on it is still OK.... but have no clue as to how to get
    >>> to the data. I'd appreciate any suggestions.

    >>
    >>Duplicate the disk now. Never work with the source when trying
    >>to recover data.

    > Cant duplicate it if it cant read any partition info from it.


    But of course, that depends on what "it" means.

    > Easus recovers them.


    Bullshit. At best, that depends on the circumstance.

    Before you play around, you get serious and do what you should've
    done to begin with. Job one is duplicating what you have. Anybody
    who knows anything about computing should know that having a
    backup copy of your stuff is half of what computing is all about.
    Telling someone to mess around with the data that they should have
    a copy of is the blind leading the blind.
    --
















    > Path: news.astraweb.com!border6.newsrouter.astraweb.com!news.glorb.com!news-in-01.newsfeed.easynews.com!easynews!core-easynews-01!easynews.com!en-nntp-07.dc1.easynews.com.POSTED!p5q-e
    > Newsgroups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
    > From: Winniethepooh 100acrewoods.org (GMAN)
    > Subject: Re: Hard drive help needed
    > References: <gm0n779hhfgvfdff11m6ejrm2vpdad8idv 4ax.com> <b77a4ed3-877a-47e1-baea-8fa7c00605c3 w28g2000yqw.googlegroups.com>
    > X-Newsreader: News Xpress 2.01
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    > Message-ID: <zR1fq.220185$AU4.177959 en-nntp-07.dc1.easynews.com>
    > X-Complaints-To: abuse easynews.com
    > Organization: EasyNews, UseNet made Easy!
    > X-Complaints-Info: Please be sure to forward a copy of ALL headers otherwise we will be unable to process your complaint properly.
    > Date: Fri, 23 Sep 2011 15:46:39 GMT
    >
     
    John Doe, Sep 24, 2011
    #9
  10. Charlie Hoffpauir

    Flasherly Guest

    On Sep 23, 8:17 pm, John Doe <> wrote:
    >
    > > Easus recovers them.

    >
    > Bullshit. At best, that depends on the circumstance.


    A little more than that, and I've used most all since PCTools and
    Norton Disk Doctor for DOS4&5. Easeus - at best what they deserve is
    to be spaelt right - Data Recovery and Partition Master software
    deserves the credit they're getting. It's a long way from anything
    going by a dread of bloated rot in Symantec suites or the pain of
    sparse pickings in Partition Magic. Still too early for me, though,
    these wildly large FAT32 partitions Easeus deals in, though I do like
    what I see (stave them stakes NTFS(c) drives thick and hard). As for
    Data Recovery, if it's important enough for a chance not overwritten,
    that's what I go to in the easiest sense. I don't mess much more with
    half a dozen "known" recovery utilities - funny how known actually
    works in so many hit-&-miss tactics I've experienced - nor was I ever
    much of a binary writer with the HD editors. Yep, Easeus is just way
    too cool not to check it out.
     
    Flasherly, Sep 24, 2011
    #10
  11. Charlie Hoffpauir

    GMAN Guest

    In article <4e7d2175$0$31119$c3e8da3$>, John Doe <> wrote:
    >Winniethepooh 100acrewoods.org (GMAN) wrote:
    >
    >> ultraport mail.com wrote:
    >>> Charlie Hoffpauir <inva... invalid.com> wrote:

    >
    >>>> My daughter has an old Win 98 computer that she was trying to
    >>>> get some data from. She has no backup (she's a lawyer, so I
    >>>> suspect that's part of the problem) and the computer wouldn't
    >>>> boot up. So I removed the HD. It's an old Seagate, 3 GB,
    >>>> ST33220A. I connected it (PATA interface) and tried to read
    >>>> the data, without success. Windows will see it, but won't read
    >>>> anything from it and properties reports zero size. I'm hoping
    >>>> that it's just the boot tracks that are messed up and that the
    >>>> data on it is still OK.... but have no clue as to how to get
    >>>> to the data. I'd appreciate any suggestions.
    >>>
    >>>Duplicate the disk now. Never work with the source when trying
    >>>to recover data.

    >> Cant duplicate it if it cant read any partition info from it.

    >
    >But of course, that depends on what "it" means.
    >
    >> Easus recovers them.

    >
    >Bullshit. At best, that depends on the circumstance.
    >
    >Before you play around, you get serious and do what you should've
    >done to begin with. Job one is duplicating what you have. Anybody
    >who knows anything about computing should know that having a
    >backup copy of your stuff is half of what computing is all about.
    >Telling someone to mess around with the data that they should have
    >a copy of is the blind leading the blind.



    Ok, tell us how he is to make a copy of a drive that is at this point ,
    unreadable and partitionless?
     
    GMAN, Sep 24, 2011
    #11
  12. Charlie Hoffpauir

    GMAN Guest

    In article <>, Flasherly <> wrote:
    >On Sep 23, 8:17 pm, John Doe <> wrote:
    >>
    >> > Easus recovers them.

    >>
    >> Bullshit. At best, that depends on the circumstance.

    >
    >A little more than that, and I've used most all since PCTools and
    >Norton Disk Doctor for DOS4&5. Easeus - at best what they deserve is
    >to be spaelt right - Data Recovery and Partition Master software
    >deserves the credit they're getting. It's a long way from anything
    >going by a dread of bloated rot in Symantec suites or the pain of
    >sparse pickings in Partition Magic. Still too early for me, though,
    >these wildly large FAT32 partitions Easeus deals in, though I do like
    >what I see (stave them stakes NTFS(c) drives thick and hard). As for
    >Data Recovery, if it's important enough for a chance not overwritten,
    >that's what I go to in the easiest sense. I don't mess much more with
    >half a dozen "known" recovery utilities - funny how known actually
    >works in so many hit-&-miss tactics I've experienced - nor was I ever
    >much of a binary writer with the HD editors. Yep, Easeus is just way
    >too cool not to check it out.



    Of all people to lecture me about spelling and grammar! LOL!
     
    GMAN, Sep 24, 2011
    #12
  13. Charlie Hoffpauir

    Guest

    On Sep 24, 11:21 am, (GMAN) wrote:
    > In article <4e7d2175$0$31119$c3e8da3$>, John Doe <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > >Winniethepooh 100acrewoods.org (GMAN) wrote:

    >
    > >> ultraport mail.com wrote:
    > >>> Charlie Hoffpauir <inva... invalid.com> wrote:

    >
    > >>>> My daughter has an old Win 98 computer that she was trying to
    > >>>> get some data from. She has no backup (she's a lawyer, so I
    > >>>> suspect that's part of the problem) and the computer wouldn't
    > >>>> boot up. So I removed the HD. It's an old Seagate, 3 GB,
    > >>>> ST33220A. I connected it (PATA interface) and tried to read
    > >>>> the data, without success. Windows will see it, but won't read
    > >>>> anything from it and properties reports zero size. I'm hoping
    > >>>> that it's just the boot tracks that are messed up and that the
    > >>>> data on it is still OK.... but have no clue as to how to get
    > >>>> to the data. I'd appreciate any suggestions.

    >
    > >>>Duplicate the disk now. Never work with the source when trying
    > >>>to recover data.
    > >> Cant duplicate it if it cant read any partition info from it.

    >
    > >But of course, that depends on what "it" means.

    >
    > >> Easus recovers them.

    >
    > >Bullshit. At best, that depends on the circumstance.

    >
    > >Before you play around, you get serious and do what you should've
    > >done to begin with. Job one is duplicating what you have. Anybody
    > >who knows anything about computing should know that having a
    > >backup copy of your stuff is half of what computing is all about.
    > >Telling someone to mess around with the data that they should have
    > >a copy of is the blind leading the blind.

    >
    > Ok, tell us


    It has nothing to do with "us", it has to do with the same idiot/jerk
    who says that joining an open wireless network without permission is
    illegal.

    > how he is to make a copy of a drive that is at this point ,
    > unreadable and partitionless?


    Learn how to form a legitimate question, then do the research.
     
    , Sep 25, 2011
    #13
  14. Charlie Hoffpauir

    Franc Zabkar Guest

    On Sat, 24 Sep 2011 16:21:32 GMT,
    (GMAN) put finger to keyboard and composed:

    >Ok, tell us how he is to make a copy of a drive that is at this point ,
    >unreadable and partitionless?


    If the drive has a logical problem, ie file system damage, then the
    safest approach is to clone it, sector-by-sector, and then use data
    recovery software on the clone.

    If, OTOH, the drive has a physical problem, then no software will see
    it. In fact the OP states that the drive's "properties reports zero
    size". This suggests that the drive does indeed have a physical
    problem. The manufacturer's diagnostic, SeaTools, should be able to
    confirm this.

    BTW, when was the last time anyone saw a lawyer give free advice?

    - Franc Zabkar
    --
    Please remove one 'i' from my address when replying by email.
     
    Franc Zabkar, Sep 27, 2011
    #14
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