Continuous Form

Discussion in 'Microsoft Access Forms' started by Andy, Dec 9, 2003.

  1. Andy

    Andy Guest

    Can anyone tell me how I go about using a continuous form.
    I want to enter upto five entries in my database but have
    them all relating to the same invoice number.
    Thanks
    Andy
     
    Andy, Dec 9, 2003
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. You don't mention what version of ms-access you are using.

    However, try creating a new database when you launch ms-access.

    When you go file->new, you get two tabs, the 2nd tab usually has a bunch of
    sample applications you can create/use.

    In addition, there is a Northwind sample application on your office cd.
    Hopefully, you installed it during your ms-access install. That application
    has some invoice screens in it.


    The idea here is to use a main form which is based on the invoice table. You
    then create a one-to "many" relationship to display the invoice "details".
    You then place a continues sub-form on the main invoice form. So, each
    invoice has "many" details (in your case, you mention up to 5, but why make
    any limit. If you design is correct, then it is no more work to have 2, or
    20 entries for a give invoice.

    As mentioned, get a copy of the Northwind database that came with ms-access,
    as it has many sample screens, including some invoice ones. Also, check out
    the database wizard (when you create a new database...try the 2nd tab called
    "databases". There is some sample applications that invoice screens).

    In addition, check out the following sample applications, again many have
    sample invoice forms you can learn from.

    http://search.officeupdate.microsoft.com/TemplateGallery/result.asp?qu=datab
    ase


    Continues forms are really what we use in ms-access to "replace" grids with.
    Here is some sample screen shots of continues forms of mine:

    http://www.attcanada.net/~kallal.msn/Articles/Grid.htm

    --
    Albert D. Kallal (MVP)
    Edmonton, Alberta Canada

    http://www.attcanada.net/~kallal.msn
     
    Albert D. Kallal, Dec 9, 2003
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. Andy

    andy Guest

    Thanks for the help.




    >-----Original Message-----
    >You don't mention what version of ms-access you are using.
    >
    >However, try creating a new database when you launch ms-

    access.
    >
    >When you go file->new, you get two tabs, the 2nd tab

    usually has a bunch of
    >sample applications you can create/use.
    >
    >In addition, there is a Northwind sample application on

    your office cd.
    >Hopefully, you installed it during your ms-access

    install. That application
    >has some invoice screens in it.
    >
    >
    >The idea here is to use a main form which is based on the

    invoice table. You
    >then create a one-to "many" relationship to display the

    invoice "details".
    >You then place a continues sub-form on the main invoice

    form. So, each
    >invoice has "many" details (in your case, you mention up

    to 5, but why make
    >any limit. If you design is correct, then it is no more

    work to have 2, or
    >20 entries for a give invoice.
    >
    >As mentioned, get a copy of the Northwind database that

    came with ms-access,
    >as it has many sample screens, including some invoice

    ones. Also, check out
    >the database wizard (when you create a new database...try

    the 2nd tab called
    >"databases". There is some sample applications that

    invoice screens).
    >
    >In addition, check out the following sample applications,

    again many have
    >sample invoice forms you can learn from.
    >
    >http://search.officeupdate.microsoft.com/TemplateGallery/r

    esult.asp?qu=datab
    >ase
    >
    >
    >Continues forms are really what we use in ms-access

    to "replace" grids with.
    >Here is some sample screen shots of continues forms of

    mine:
    >
    >http://www.attcanada.net/~kallal.msn/Articles/Grid.htm
    >
    >--
    >Albert D. Kallal (MVP)
    >Edmonton, Alberta Canada
    >
    >http://www.attcanada.net/~kallal.msn
    >
    >
    >
    >.
    >
     
    andy, Dec 9, 2003
    #3
    1. Advertisements

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Yair Sageev

    Continuous subforms in continuous subforms

    Yair Sageev, Aug 8, 2003, in forum: Microsoft Access Forms
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    408
    Van T. Dinh
    Aug 13, 2003
  2. Dave Elliott

    Need Sub-Form on Continuous Form?

    Dave Elliott, Feb 5, 2004, in forum: Microsoft Access Forms
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    134
    John Vinson
    Feb 5, 2004
  3. Andrew
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    930
    Andrew
    May 11, 2004
  4. Continuous subform per continuous form element

    , Jul 19, 2006, in forum: Microsoft Access Forms
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    557
  5. AR51NAL

    Continuous Subform within a Continuous Form - Possible?

    AR51NAL, Jun 23, 2009, in forum: Microsoft Access Forms
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    773
    Stefan Hoffmann
    Jun 23, 2009
Loading...

Share This Page