Changing USB drive letter

Discussion in 'Computer Hardware' started by Roy, Jun 22, 2008.

  1. Roy

    Roy Guest

    Hello group
    Recently I was dismayed why my USB drive was not recognized anymore
    by window explorer. Therefore if I plug it on the USB slot it does
    nothing. I searched the web for some ideas and came from this fellow
    which states:\

    'A user of a company I know recently told me the following experience
    he had with a USB flash drive. The user traveled a lot and had a
    laptop that he used to connect to the company's network when he was in
    the office. And he was used to plugging his flash drive into the USB
    slot on his laptop so he could transfer files to another machine he
    used at home. But one day he came into the office, connected his
    laptop to the network, plugged in the flash drive and nothing happened
    -- normally an Explorer window would open displaying the contents of
    the drive. This was disconcerting, so he opened My Computer and
    discovered that the USB drive wasn't there. Puzzled by this, he took
    out another flash drive from his pocket and tried it, and this time it
    worked fine so he knew at least the problem wasn't with his computer.
    He was just about resigned to throwing out his first drive when he
    decided to send me a quick email detailing the problem. My immediate
    reaction too was that it was that the drive had failed, but then I
    thought about it some more. One of the key steps in troubleshooting
    problems is to ask what just happened. The drive failure had occurred
    after he connected his machine to the network, so could it be an issue
    with the network? I emailed back and suggested he disconnect his
    laptop from the network and try the flash drive again, and a short
    time later I received an email saying the drive now worked!
    Then it dawned on me. I told him to remove the drive, connect to the
    network and open My Computer again and look for something different.
    He did this and told me there was a new mapped network drive that he
    hadn't seen before. Aha! The network administrator must have modified
    their logon script to map a new drive on users' computers, and this
    new mapped drive probably assigned the very same drive letter that
    this particular user's laptop had previously assigned to his first USB
    drive. I told him to plug the USB drive in again, open Computer
    Management, and change the drive letter of the USB drive. He did this,
    and right away an Explorer window opened displaying the contents of
    his USB drive. Problem solved'


    Since I have never done such things these ideas sound strange to me.
    Meaning if the drive is malfunctioning it might have something to do
    with such and not a hardware fault.
    Although I was not using a laptop but just a desktop PC.

    I did found the computer management ( local) and had viewed the disk
    management on the right pane.
    Indeed there are letters that indicates one drive say for example
    Drive D and drive C which is easier tounderstand as well asthe Drive E
    and F and so forth. Previously the Flash drive was recognized as
    Drive G and J as well as drive H for another External hard drive.
    But now it does not recognized my flash drive.
    What I don't understand is why window explorer does not recognize my
    USB flash drive but still do with the other drives.

    Early this morning I was plugging these drives to the networked
    computer in the internet cafe and immediately it was not recognized
    and this kept me worried so when I arrived home I immediately plugged
    it and there the flash drive is not functioning or being recognized
    anymore.
    Could somebody offer me their advice how to sort this out

    What is going on?

    TIA
    Roy
     
    Roy, Jun 22, 2008
    #1
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  2. Roy

    Paul Guest

    Roy wrote:
    > Hello group
    > Recently I was dismayed why my USB drive was not recognized anymore
    > by window explorer. Therefore if I plug it on the USB slot it does
    > nothing. I searched the web for some ideas and came from this fellow
    > which states:\
    >
    > 'A user of a company I know recently told me the following experience
    > he had with a USB flash drive. The user traveled a lot and had a
    > laptop that he used to connect to the company's network when he was in
    > the office. And he was used to plugging his flash drive into the USB
    > slot on his laptop so he could transfer files to another machine he
    > used at home. But one day he came into the office, connected his
    > laptop to the network, plugged in the flash drive and nothing happened
    > -- normally an Explorer window would open displaying the contents of
    > the drive. This was disconcerting, so he opened My Computer and
    > discovered that the USB drive wasn't there. Puzzled by this, he took
    > out another flash drive from his pocket and tried it, and this time it
    > worked fine so he knew at least the problem wasn't with his computer.
    > He was just about resigned to throwing out his first drive when he
    > decided to send me a quick email detailing the problem. My immediate
    > reaction too was that it was that the drive had failed, but then I
    > thought about it some more. One of the key steps in troubleshooting
    > problems is to ask what just happened. The drive failure had occurred
    > after he connected his machine to the network, so could it be an issue
    > with the network? I emailed back and suggested he disconnect his
    > laptop from the network and try the flash drive again, and a short
    > time later I received an email saying the drive now worked!
    > Then it dawned on me. I told him to remove the drive, connect to the
    > network and open My Computer again and look for something different.
    > He did this and told me there was a new mapped network drive that he
    > hadn't seen before. Aha! The network administrator must have modified
    > their logon script to map a new drive on users' computers, and this
    > new mapped drive probably assigned the very same drive letter that
    > this particular user's laptop had previously assigned to his first USB
    > drive. I told him to plug the USB drive in again, open Computer
    > Management, and change the drive letter of the USB drive. He did this,
    > and right away an Explorer window opened displaying the contents of
    > his USB drive. Problem solved'
    >
    >
    > Since I have never done such things these ideas sound strange to me.
    > Meaning if the drive is malfunctioning it might have something to do
    > with such and not a hardware fault.
    > Although I was not using a laptop but just a desktop PC.
    >
    > I did found the computer management ( local) and had viewed the disk
    > management on the right pane.
    > Indeed there are letters that indicates one drive say for example
    > Drive D and drive C which is easier tounderstand as well asthe Drive E
    > and F and so forth. Previously the Flash drive was recognized as
    > Drive G and J as well as drive H for another External hard drive.
    > But now it does not recognized my flash drive.
    > What I don't understand is why window explorer does not recognize my
    > USB flash drive but still do with the other drives.
    >
    > Early this morning I was plugging these drives to the networked
    > computer in the internet cafe and immediately it was not recognized
    > and this kept me worried so when I arrived home I immediately plugged
    > it and there the flash drive is not functioning or being recognized
    > anymore.
    > Could somebody offer me their advice how to sort this out
    >
    > What is going on?
    >
    > TIA
    > Roy
    >


    Uwe Sieber has a web site, with that kind of information on it.

    http://www.uwe-sieber.de/usbtrouble_e.html

    From a hardware perspective, you can verify that the plugged in
    device is being detected (communicated with), via UVCView program
    from Microsoft. (Use the upper right hand link, to download an
    executable for Windows 32 bit OS.) This is an archived web page,
    as Microsoft has taken down the download page. There have been
    several versions of programs that look like this one, and so far,
    this one is the most capable. (Some of the originals, had limits
    on the number of ports they could handle.)

    http://web.archive.org/web/20070516...com/whdc/device/stream/vidcap/UVCViewdwn.mspx

    If the physical layer is working, and the USB device can be
    enumerated, and fill the window with data, then the problem
    must be at a higher level in software. (In the picture here,
    you can see VID/PID 0x0ECD 0xA100 device has been detected, and
    the presence of the Endpoint Descriptor presumably means a
    communications path is set up.)

    http://www.die.de/blog/content/binary/usbview.png

    For resetting the USB stack, usbman.com has a page describing a
    procedure to do in safe mode. But this doesn't necessarily fix
    everything. There are also instances where a driver cache is
    corrupted, or the registry is locked to updates, that might
    cause a procedure like this to not fix anything. But in those
    cases, searching on the exact error text, will likely lead you
    in the right direction.

    http://www.usbman.com/Guides/Cleanup Device Manager Safe Mode.htm

    HTH,
    Paul
     
    Paul, Jun 22, 2008
    #2
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  3. Roy

    Roy Guest

    On Jun 22, 4:04 pm, Paul <> wrote:
    > Roy wrote:
    > > Hello group
    > > Recently I  was dismayed why my USB drive was not recognized anymore
    > > by window explorer. Therefore if I  plug it on the USB slot it does
    > > nothing. I searched the web for some ideas and came from this fellow
    > > which states:\

    >
    > > 'A user of a company I know recently told me the following experience
    > > he had with a USB flash drive. The user traveled a lot and had a
    > > laptop that he used to connect to the company's network when he was in
    > > the office. And he was used to plugging his flash drive into the USB
    > > slot on his laptop so he could transfer files to another machine he
    > > used at home. But one day he came into the office, connected his
    > > laptop to the network, plugged in the flash drive and nothing happened
    > > -- normally an Explorer window would open displaying the contents of
    > > the drive. This was disconcerting, so he opened My Computer and
    > > discovered that the USB drive wasn't there. Puzzled by this, he took
    > > out another flash drive from his pocket and tried it, and this time it
    > > worked fine so he knew at least the problem wasn't with his computer.
    > > He was just about resigned to throwing out his first drive when he
    > > decided to send me a quick email detailing the problem. My immediate
    > > reaction too was that it was that the drive had failed, but then I
    > > thought about it some more. One of the key steps in troubleshooting
    > > problems is to ask what just happened. The drive failure had occurred
    > > after he connected his machine to the network, so could it be an issue
    > > with the network? I emailed back and suggested he disconnect his
    > > laptop from the network and try the flash drive again, and a short
    > > time later I received an email saying the drive now worked!
    > > Then it dawned on me. I told him to remove the drive, connect to the
    > > network and open My Computer again and look for something different.
    > > He did this and told me there was a new mapped network drive that he
    > > hadn't seen before. Aha! The network administrator must have modified
    > > their logon script to map a new drive on users' computers, and this
    > > new mapped drive probably assigned the very same drive letter that
    > > this particular user's laptop had previously assigned to his first USB
    > > drive. I told him to plug the USB drive in again, open Computer
    > > Management, and change the drive letter of the USB drive. He did this,
    > > and right away an Explorer window opened displaying the contents of
    > > his USB drive. Problem solved'

    >
    > > Since I have never done such things these ideas sound strange to me.
    > > Meaning if the drive is malfunctioning it might have something to do
    > > with such and not a hardware fault.
    > > Although I was not using a laptop but just a desktop PC.

    >
    > > I did found the computer management ( local) and had viewed the disk
    > > management on the right pane.
    > > Indeed there are letters that indicates one drive say for example
    > > Drive D and drive C which is easier tounderstand as well asthe Drive E
    > > and F  and so forth. Previously the Flash drive was recognized as
    > > Drive G and J as well as drive H for  another External hard drive.
    > > But now it does not recognized my flash drive.
    > > What I don't understand is why window explorer does not recognize my
    > > USB flash drive but still do with the other drives.

    >
    > > Early this morning I was plugging these drives to the networked
    > > computer in the internet cafe and immediately it was not recognized
    > > and this kept me worried so when I arrived home I immediately plugged
    > > it and there the flash drive is not functioning or being recognized
    > > anymore.
    > > Could somebody offer me their advice how to sort this out

    >
    > > What is going on?

    >
    > > TIA
    > > Roy

    >
    > Uwe Sieber has a web site, with that kind of information on it.
    >
    > http://www.uwe-sieber.de/usbtrouble_e.html
    >
    >  From a hardware perspective, you can verify that the plugged in
    > device is being detected (communicated with), via UVCView program
    > from Microsoft. (Use the upper right hand link, to download an
    > executable for Windows 32 bit OS.) This is an archived web page,
    > as Microsoft has taken down the download page. There have been
    > several versions of programs that look like this one, and so far,
    > this one is the most capable. (Some of the originals, had limits
    > on the number of ports they could handle.)
    >
    > http://web.archive.org/web/20070516010130/http://www.microsoft.com/wh...
    >
    > If the physical layer is working, and the USB device can be
    > enumerated, and fill the window with data, then the problem
    > must be at a higher level in software. (In the picture here,
    > you can see VID/PID 0x0ECD 0xA100 device has been detected, and
    > the presence of the Endpoint Descriptor presumably means a
    > communications path is set up.)
    >
    > http://www.die.de/blog/content/binary/usbview.png
    >
    > For resetting the USB stack, usbman.com has a page describing a
    > procedure to do in safe mode. But this doesn't necessarily fix
    > everything. There are also instances where a driver cache is
    > corrupted, or the registry is locked to updates, that might
    > cause a procedure like this to not fix anything. But in those
    > cases, searching on the exact error text, will likely lead you
    > in the right direction.
    >
    > http://www.usbman.com/Guides/Cleanup Device Manager Safe Mode...
    >
    > HTH,
    >      Paul- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -

    Thanks !. sounds complicated and Microsoft is cautious about
    installing hotfixes which may not be the solution to the problem
    I did try to follow a certain procedure
    http://www.port-huron.k12.mi.us/tech/Handouts/How-To/usbflashdrivetroubleshooting.pdf
    But it when I right my computer- choose manage- Storage- disk
    management
    Then I right clicked the listed removable disk then change drive
    letter and paths
    And want to assign a new drive letter.
    I was given a warning that changing the drive letter might cause
    problem that the hardware connected might no longer run so stopped
    there.
    I also tried to create another drive letter but it says the letter was
    not recognized.
    Creating a new folder needs that you need another path, but when I
    browsed I only find that there are two path- the C and D drive.
    So I got lost here and would need some suggestion from people that are
    familiar with this methods.
    Thank You!
     
    Roy, Jun 22, 2008
    #3
  4. Roy

    Paul Guest

    Roy wrote:
    > On Jun 22, 4:04 pm, Paul <> wrote:
    >> Roy wrote:
    >>> Hello group
    >>> Recently I was dismayed why my USB drive was not recognized anymore
    >>> by window explorer. Therefore if I plug it on the USB slot it does
    >>> nothing. I searched the web for some ideas and came from this fellow
    >>> which states:\
    >>> 'A user of a company I know recently told me the following experience
    >>> he had with a USB flash drive. The user traveled a lot and had a
    >>> laptop that he used to connect to the company's network when he was in
    >>> the office. And he was used to plugging his flash drive into the USB
    >>> slot on his laptop so he could transfer files to another machine he
    >>> used at home. But one day he came into the office, connected his
    >>> laptop to the network, plugged in the flash drive and nothing happened
    >>> -- normally an Explorer window would open displaying the contents of
    >>> the drive. This was disconcerting, so he opened My Computer and
    >>> discovered that the USB drive wasn't there. Puzzled by this, he took
    >>> out another flash drive from his pocket and tried it, and this time it
    >>> worked fine so he knew at least the problem wasn't with his computer.
    >>> He was just about resigned to throwing out his first drive when he
    >>> decided to send me a quick email detailing the problem. My immediate
    >>> reaction too was that it was that the drive had failed, but then I
    >>> thought about it some more. One of the key steps in troubleshooting
    >>> problems is to ask what just happened. The drive failure had occurred
    >>> after he connected his machine to the network, so could it be an issue
    >>> with the network? I emailed back and suggested he disconnect his
    >>> laptop from the network and try the flash drive again, and a short
    >>> time later I received an email saying the drive now worked!
    >>> Then it dawned on me. I told him to remove the drive, connect to the
    >>> network and open My Computer again and look for something different.
    >>> He did this and told me there was a new mapped network drive that he
    >>> hadn't seen before. Aha! The network administrator must have modified
    >>> their logon script to map a new drive on users' computers, and this
    >>> new mapped drive probably assigned the very same drive letter that
    >>> this particular user's laptop had previously assigned to his first USB
    >>> drive. I told him to plug the USB drive in again, open Computer
    >>> Management, and change the drive letter of the USB drive. He did this,
    >>> and right away an Explorer window opened displaying the contents of
    >>> his USB drive. Problem solved'
    >>> Since I have never done such things these ideas sound strange to me.
    >>> Meaning if the drive is malfunctioning it might have something to do
    >>> with such and not a hardware fault.
    >>> Although I was not using a laptop but just a desktop PC.
    >>> I did found the computer management ( local) and had viewed the disk
    >>> management on the right pane.
    >>> Indeed there are letters that indicates one drive say for example
    >>> Drive D and drive C which is easier tounderstand as well asthe Drive E
    >>> and F and so forth. Previously the Flash drive was recognized as
    >>> Drive G and J as well as drive H for another External hard drive.
    >>> But now it does not recognized my flash drive.
    >>> What I don't understand is why window explorer does not recognize my
    >>> USB flash drive but still do with the other drives.
    >>> Early this morning I was plugging these drives to the networked
    >>> computer in the internet cafe and immediately it was not recognized
    >>> and this kept me worried so when I arrived home I immediately plugged
    >>> it and there the flash drive is not functioning or being recognized
    >>> anymore.
    >>> Could somebody offer me their advice how to sort this out
    >>> What is going on?
    >>> TIA
    >>> Roy

    >> Uwe Sieber has a web site, with that kind of information on it.
    >>
    >> http://www.uwe-sieber.de/usbtrouble_e.html
    >>
    >> From a hardware perspective, you can verify that the plugged in
    >> device is being detected (communicated with), via UVCView program
    >> from Microsoft. (Use the upper right hand link, to download an
    >> executable for Windows 32 bit OS.) This is an archived web page,
    >> as Microsoft has taken down the download page. There have been
    >> several versions of programs that look like this one, and so far,
    >> this one is the most capable. (Some of the originals, had limits
    >> on the number of ports they could handle.)
    >>
    >> http://web.archive.org/web/20070516010130/http://www.microsoft.com/wh...
    >>
    >> If the physical layer is working, and the USB device can be
    >> enumerated, and fill the window with data, then the problem
    >> must be at a higher level in software. (In the picture here,
    >> you can see VID/PID 0x0ECD 0xA100 device has been detected, and
    >> the presence of the Endpoint Descriptor presumably means a
    >> communications path is set up.)
    >>
    >> http://www.die.de/blog/content/binary/usbview.png
    >>
    >> For resetting the USB stack, usbman.com has a page describing a
    >> procedure to do in safe mode. But this doesn't necessarily fix
    >> everything. There are also instances where a driver cache is
    >> corrupted, or the registry is locked to updates, that might
    >> cause a procedure like this to not fix anything. But in those
    >> cases, searching on the exact error text, will likely lead you
    >> in the right direction.
    >>
    >> http://www.usbman.com/Guides/Cleanup Device Manager Safe Mode...
    >>
    >> HTH,
    >> Paul- Hide quoted text -
    >>
    >> - Show quoted text -

    > Thanks !. sounds complicated and Microsoft is cautious about
    > installing hotfixes which may not be the solution to the problem
    > I did try to follow a certain procedure
    > http://www.port-huron.k12.mi.us/tech/Handouts/How-To/usbflashdrivetroubleshooting.pdf
    > But it when I right my computer- choose manage- Storage- disk
    > management
    > Then I right clicked the listed removable disk then change drive
    > letter and paths
    > And want to assign a new drive letter.
    > I was given a warning that changing the drive letter might cause
    > problem that the hardware connected might no longer run so stopped
    > there.
    > I also tried to create another drive letter but it says the letter was
    > not recognized.
    > Creating a new folder needs that you need another path, but when I
    > browsed I only find that there are two path- the C and D drive.
    > So I got lost here and would need some suggestion from people that are
    > familiar with this methods.
    > Thank You!
    >


    Have a look at this page. The Drive Letter Manager
    might be able to change a USB drive letter for you.
    I haven't used it, because I don't have any USB flash
    devices here.

    http://www.uwe-sieber.de/usbdlm_e.html

    Paul
     
    Paul, Jun 22, 2008
    #4
  5. Roy

    Roy Guest

    On Jun 22, 6:50 pm, Paul <> wrote:
    > Roy wrote:
    > > On Jun 22, 4:04 pm, Paul <> wrote:
    > >> Roy wrote:
    > >>> Hello group
    > >>> Recently I  was dismayed why my USB drive was not recognized anymore
    > >>> by window explorer. Therefore if I  plug it on the USB slot it does
    > >>> nothing. I searched the web for some ideas and came from this fellow
    > >>> which states:\
    > >>> 'A user of a company I know recently told me the following experience
    > >>> he had with a USB flash drive. The user traveled a lot and had a
    > >>> laptop that he used to connect to the company's network when he was in
    > >>> the office. And he was used to plugging his flash drive into the USB
    > >>> slot on his laptop so he could transfer files to another machine he
    > >>> used at home. But one day he came into the office, connected his
    > >>> laptop to the network, plugged in the flash drive and nothing happened
    > >>> -- normally an Explorer window would open displaying the contents of
    > >>> the drive. This was disconcerting, so he opened My Computer and
    > >>> discovered that the USB drive wasn't there. Puzzled by this, he took
    > >>> out another flash drive from his pocket and tried it, and this time it
    > >>> worked fine so he knew at least the problem wasn't with his computer.
    > >>> He was just about resigned to throwing out his first drive when he
    > >>> decided to send me a quick email detailing the problem. My immediate
    > >>> reaction too was that it was that the drive had failed, but then I
    > >>> thought about it some more. One of the key steps in troubleshooting
    > >>> problems is to ask what just happened. The drive failure had occurred
    > >>> after he connected his machine to the network, so could it be an issue
    > >>> with the network? I emailed back and suggested he disconnect his
    > >>> laptop from the network and try the flash drive again, and a short
    > >>> time later I received an email saying the drive now worked!
    > >>> Then it dawned on me. I told him to remove the drive, connect to the
    > >>> network and open My Computer again and look for something different.
    > >>> He did this and told me there was a new mapped network drive that he
    > >>> hadn't seen before. Aha! The network administrator must have modified
    > >>> their logon script to map a new drive on users' computers, and this
    > >>> new mapped drive probably assigned the very same drive letter that
    > >>> this particular user's laptop had previously assigned to his first USB
    > >>> drive. I told him to plug the USB drive in again, open Computer
    > >>> Management, and change the drive letter of the USB drive. He did this,
    > >>> and right away an Explorer window opened displaying the contents of
    > >>> his USB drive. Problem solved'
    > >>> Since I have never done such things these ideas sound strange to me.
    > >>> Meaning if the drive is malfunctioning it might have something to do
    > >>> with such and not a hardware fault.
    > >>> Although I was not using a laptop but just a desktop PC.
    > >>> I did found the computer management ( local) and had viewed the disk
    > >>> management on the right pane.
    > >>> Indeed there are letters that indicates one drive say for example
    > >>> Drive D and drive C which is easier tounderstand as well asthe Drive E
    > >>> and F  and so forth. Previously the Flash drive was recognized as
    > >>> Drive G and J as well as drive H for  another External hard drive.
    > >>> But now it does not recognized my flash drive.
    > >>> What I don't understand is why window explorer does not recognize my
    > >>> USB flash drive but still do with the other drives.
    > >>> Early this morning I was plugging these drives to the networked
    > >>> computer in the internet cafe and immediately it was not recognized
    > >>> and this kept me worried so when I arrived home I immediately plugged
    > >>> it and there the flash drive is not functioning or being recognized
    > >>> anymore.
    > >>> Could somebody offer me their advice how to sort this out
    > >>> What is going on?
    > >>> TIA
    > >>> Roy
    > >> Uwe Sieber has a web site, with that kind of information on it.

    >
    > >>http://www.uwe-sieber.de/usbtrouble_e.html

    >
    > >>  From a hardware perspective, you can verify that the plugged in
    > >> device is being detected (communicated with), via UVCView program
    > >> from Microsoft. (Use the upper right hand link, to download an
    > >> executable for Windows 32 bit OS.) This is an archived web page,
    > >> as Microsoft has taken down the download page. There have been
    > >> several versions of programs that look like this one, and so far,
    > >> this one is the most capable. (Some of the originals, had limits
    > >> on the number of ports they could handle.)

    >
    > >>http://web.archive.org/web/20070516010130/http://www.microsoft.com/wh....

    >
    > >> If the physical layer is working, and the USB device can be
    > >> enumerated, and fill the window with data, then the problem
    > >> must be at a higher level in software. (In the picture here,
    > >> you can see VID/PID 0x0ECD 0xA100 device has been detected, and
    > >> the presence of the Endpoint Descriptor presumably means a
    > >> communications path is set up.)

    >
    > >>http://www.die.de/blog/content/binary/usbview.png

    >
    > >> For resetting the USB stack, usbman.com has a page describing a
    > >> procedure to do in safe mode. But this doesn't necessarily fix
    > >> everything. There are also instances where a driver cache is
    > >> corrupted, or the registry is locked to updates, that might
    > >> cause a procedure like this to not fix anything. But in those
    > >> cases, searching on the exact error text, will likely lead you
    > >> in the right direction.

    >
    > >>http://www.usbman.com/Guides/Cleanup Device Manager Safe Mode....

    >
    > >> HTH,
    > >>      Paul- Hide quoted text -

    >
    > >> - Show quoted text -

    > > Thanks !. sounds complicated and Microsoft is cautious about
    > > installing hotfixes which may not be the solution to the problem
    > > I did try to follow a certain procedure
    > >http://www.port-huron.k12.mi.us/tech/Handouts/How-To/usbflashdrivetro...
    > > But it when I right my computer- choose manage- Storage- disk
    > > management
    > > Then I right clicked the listed removable disk then change drive
    > > letter and paths
    > > And want to assign a new drive letter.
    > > I was given a warning that  changing the drive letter might cause
    > > problem that the hardware connected might no longer run so  stopped
    > > there.
    > > I also tried to create another drive letter but it says the letter was
    > > not recognized.
    > > Creating a new folder  needs that you need another path, but when I
    > > browsed I only find that there are two path- the C and D drive.
    > > So I got lost here and would need some suggestion from people that are
    > > familiar with this methods.
    > > Thank You!

    >
    > Have a look at this page. The Drive Letter Manager
    > might be able to change a USB drive letter for you.
    > I haven't used it, because I don't have any USB flash
    > devices here.
    >
    > http://www.uwe-sieber.de/usbdlm_e.html
    >
    >     Paul- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Thanks, I will have to read first the literature about its use.
    BTW, is there anybody here have experience about USB drive
    overvoltage? What I mean I am not discounting the fact that the
    desktopPc might have fried circuitry and this is an additional worry
    for me. I was thinking that some computers might have higher USB
    voltage rating for USBs than laptops?
    Is there a likelihood for such to happen?
    I just hope that this hardware is still intact...
     
    Roy, Jun 22, 2008
    #5
  6. Roy

    Paul Guest

    Roy wrote:
    > On Jun 22, 6:50 pm, Paul <> wrote:
    >> Roy wrote:
    >>> On Jun 22, 4:04 pm, Paul <> wrote:
    >>>> Roy wrote:
    >>>>> Hello group
    >>>>> Recently I was dismayed why my USB drive was not recognized anymore
    >>>>> by window explorer. Therefore if I plug it on the USB slot it does
    >>>>> nothing. I searched the web for some ideas and came from this fellow
    >>>>> which states:\
    >>>>> 'A user of a company I know recently told me the following experience
    >>>>> he had with a USB flash drive. The user traveled a lot and had a
    >>>>> laptop that he used to connect to the company's network when he was in
    >>>>> the office. And he was used to plugging his flash drive into the USB
    >>>>> slot on his laptop so he could transfer files to another machine he
    >>>>> used at home. But one day he came into the office, connected his
    >>>>> laptop to the network, plugged in the flash drive and nothing happened
    >>>>> -- normally an Explorer window would open displaying the contents of
    >>>>> the drive. This was disconcerting, so he opened My Computer and
    >>>>> discovered that the USB drive wasn't there. Puzzled by this, he took
    >>>>> out another flash drive from his pocket and tried it, and this time it
    >>>>> worked fine so he knew at least the problem wasn't with his computer.
    >>>>> He was just about resigned to throwing out his first drive when he
    >>>>> decided to send me a quick email detailing the problem. My immediate
    >>>>> reaction too was that it was that the drive had failed, but then I
    >>>>> thought about it some more. One of the key steps in troubleshooting
    >>>>> problems is to ask what just happened. The drive failure had occurred
    >>>>> after he connected his machine to the network, so could it be an issue
    >>>>> with the network? I emailed back and suggested he disconnect his
    >>>>> laptop from the network and try the flash drive again, and a short
    >>>>> time later I received an email saying the drive now worked!
    >>>>> Then it dawned on me. I told him to remove the drive, connect to the
    >>>>> network and open My Computer again and look for something different.
    >>>>> He did this and told me there was a new mapped network drive that he
    >>>>> hadn't seen before. Aha! The network administrator must have modified
    >>>>> their logon script to map a new drive on users' computers, and this
    >>>>> new mapped drive probably assigned the very same drive letter that
    >>>>> this particular user's laptop had previously assigned to his first USB
    >>>>> drive. I told him to plug the USB drive in again, open Computer
    >>>>> Management, and change the drive letter of the USB drive. He did this,
    >>>>> and right away an Explorer window opened displaying the contents of
    >>>>> his USB drive. Problem solved'
    >>>>> Since I have never done such things these ideas sound strange to me.
    >>>>> Meaning if the drive is malfunctioning it might have something to do
    >>>>> with such and not a hardware fault.
    >>>>> Although I was not using a laptop but just a desktop PC.
    >>>>> I did found the computer management ( local) and had viewed the disk
    >>>>> management on the right pane.
    >>>>> Indeed there are letters that indicates one drive say for example
    >>>>> Drive D and drive C which is easier tounderstand as well asthe Drive E
    >>>>> and F and so forth. Previously the Flash drive was recognized as
    >>>>> Drive G and J as well as drive H for another External hard drive.
    >>>>> But now it does not recognized my flash drive.
    >>>>> What I don't understand is why window explorer does not recognize my
    >>>>> USB flash drive but still do with the other drives.
    >>>>> Early this morning I was plugging these drives to the networked
    >>>>> computer in the internet cafe and immediately it was not recognized
    >>>>> and this kept me worried so when I arrived home I immediately plugged
    >>>>> it and there the flash drive is not functioning or being recognized
    >>>>> anymore.
    >>>>> Could somebody offer me their advice how to sort this out
    >>>>> What is going on?
    >>>>> TIA
    >>>>> Roy
    >>>> Uwe Sieber has a web site, with that kind of information on it.
    >>>> http://www.uwe-sieber.de/usbtrouble_e.html
    >>>> From a hardware perspective, you can verify that the plugged in
    >>>> device is being detected (communicated with), via UVCView program
    >>>> from Microsoft. (Use the upper right hand link, to download an
    >>>> executable for Windows 32 bit OS.) This is an archived web page,
    >>>> as Microsoft has taken down the download page. There have been
    >>>> several versions of programs that look like this one, and so far,
    >>>> this one is the most capable. (Some of the originals, had limits
    >>>> on the number of ports they could handle.)
    >>>> http://web.archive.org/web/20070516010130/http://www.microsoft.com/wh...
    >>>> If the physical layer is working, and the USB device can be
    >>>> enumerated, and fill the window with data, then the problem
    >>>> must be at a higher level in software. (In the picture here,
    >>>> you can see VID/PID 0x0ECD 0xA100 device has been detected, and
    >>>> the presence of the Endpoint Descriptor presumably means a
    >>>> communications path is set up.)
    >>>> http://www.die.de/blog/content/binary/usbview.png
    >>>> For resetting the USB stack, usbman.com has a page describing a
    >>>> procedure to do in safe mode. But this doesn't necessarily fix
    >>>> everything. There are also instances where a driver cache is
    >>>> corrupted, or the registry is locked to updates, that might
    >>>> cause a procedure like this to not fix anything. But in those
    >>>> cases, searching on the exact error text, will likely lead you
    >>>> in the right direction.
    >>>> http://www.usbman.com/Guides/Cleanup Device Manager Safe Mode...
    >>>> HTH,
    >>>> Paul- Hide quoted text -
    >>>> - Show quoted text -
    >>> Thanks !. sounds complicated and Microsoft is cautious about
    >>> installing hotfixes which may not be the solution to the problem
    >>> I did try to follow a certain procedure
    >>> http://www.port-huron.k12.mi.us/tech/Handouts/How-To/usbflashdrivetro...
    >>> But it when I right my computer- choose manage- Storage- disk
    >>> management
    >>> Then I right clicked the listed removable disk then change drive
    >>> letter and paths
    >>> And want to assign a new drive letter.
    >>> I was given a warning that changing the drive letter might cause
    >>> problem that the hardware connected might no longer run so stopped
    >>> there.
    >>> I also tried to create another drive letter but it says the letter was
    >>> not recognized.
    >>> Creating a new folder needs that you need another path, but when I
    >>> browsed I only find that there are two path- the C and D drive.
    >>> So I got lost here and would need some suggestion from people that are
    >>> familiar with this methods.
    >>> Thank You!

    >> Have a look at this page. The Drive Letter Manager
    >> might be able to change a USB drive letter for you.
    >> I haven't used it, because I don't have any USB flash
    >> devices here.
    >>
    >> http://www.uwe-sieber.de/usbdlm_e.html
    >>
    >> Paul- Hide quoted text -
    >>
    >> - Show quoted text -

    >
    > Thanks, I will have to read first the literature about its use.
    > BTW, is there anybody here have experience about USB drive
    > overvoltage? What I mean I am not discounting the fact that the
    > desktopPc might have fried circuitry and this is an additional worry
    > for me. I was thinking that some computers might have higher USB
    > voltage rating for USBs than laptops?
    > Is there a likelihood for such to happen?
    > I just hope that this hardware is still intact...


    The USB connector consists of +5V, GND, D+, and D-. Two power
    signals and two data signals. The power level is a standard, whether
    desktop or laptop. A high power device may draw up to 500mA of
    current, and the total maximum power of 2.5 watts is just enough
    to operate a modern 2.5" hard drive.

    A USB device can be damaged by handling, such as dropped and broken.
    Or static discharge could damage a device. But the
    operating voltage should be the same on each computer. And
    the connectors seem to be well designed, at least compared to
    some more problematic connectors (Firewire).

    The reason I wanted you to use UVCView, is to see if any low
    level communication was happening or not. If there are no
    endpoints and no enumeration data being shown, for a plugged
    in USB device, it could be a hardware issue. If the right hand
    window in UVCView has data in it, then there is hope that the
    USB device is not completely dead.

    The foreign computer could also have malware or a virus on it,
    and a software like that might erase the flash device. I suppose
    a device could be "killed" by being reconfigured, but I don't understand
    how those tools work. It is possible to change the declared size
    of a USB flash device (fraudsters on Ebay do that), so there is
    some kind of interface to USB flash sticks, that hackers understand.

    The only "frying" I've heard of, is Intel ICH5/ICH5R Southbridge
    chips, can have their USB ports fail. When that happens, all the
    USB ports on the computer, fail to operate. No plugged in device
    will be recognized at all. You would not see any activity in UVCView.
    In extreme cases, there will be a burn mark on the Southbridge chip on the
    motherboard. But many of the ones reported to have
    failed, don't have the burn mark - and that is good, because
    if the chip is not burned by the failure, the computer
    continues to be bootable. When it burns, it is finished, and
    won't boot again. (I get to worry about this, because I have
    that chip on my motherboard :) )

    Paul
     
    Paul, Jun 23, 2008
    #6
  7. Roy

    Roy Guest

    On Jun 23, 8:03 am, Paul <> wrote:
    > Roy wrote:
    > > On Jun 22, 6:50 pm, Paul <> wrote:
    > >> Roy wrote:
    > >>> On Jun 22, 4:04 pm, Paul <> wrote:
    > >>>> Roy wrote:
    > >>>>> Hello group
    > >>>>> Recently I  was dismayed why my USB drive was not recognized anymore
    > >>>>> by window explorer. Therefore if I  plug it on the USB slot it does
    > >>>>> nothing. I searched the web for some ideas and came from this fellow
    > >>>>> which states:\
    > >>>>> 'A user of a company I know recently told me the following experience
    > >>>>> he had with a USB flash drive. The user traveled a lot and had a
    > >>>>> laptop that he used to connect to the company's network when he wasin
    > >>>>> the office. And he was used to plugging his flash drive into the USB
    > >>>>> slot on his laptop so he could transfer files to another machine he
    > >>>>> used at home. But one day he came into the office, connected his
    > >>>>> laptop to the network, plugged in the flash drive and nothing happened
    > >>>>> -- normally an Explorer window would open displaying the contents of
    > >>>>> the drive. This was disconcerting, so he opened My Computer and
    > >>>>> discovered that the USB drive wasn't there. Puzzled by this, he took
    > >>>>> out another flash drive from his pocket and tried it, and this timeit
    > >>>>> worked fine so he knew at least the problem wasn't with his computer.
    > >>>>> He was just about resigned to throwing out his first drive when he
    > >>>>> decided to send me a quick email detailing the problem. My immediate
    > >>>>> reaction too was that it was that the drive had failed, but then I
    > >>>>> thought about it some more. One of the key steps in troubleshooting
    > >>>>> problems is to ask what just happened. The drive failure had occurred
    > >>>>> after he connected his machine to the network, so could it be an issue
    > >>>>> with the network? I emailed back and suggested he disconnect his
    > >>>>> laptop from the network and try the flash drive again, and a short
    > >>>>> time later I received an email saying the drive now worked!
    > >>>>> Then it dawned on me. I told him to remove the drive, connect to the
    > >>>>> network and open My Computer again and look for something different..
    > >>>>> He did this and told me there was a new mapped network drive that he
    > >>>>> hadn't seen before. Aha! The network administrator must have modified
    > >>>>> their logon script to map a new drive on users' computers, and this
    > >>>>> new mapped drive probably assigned the very same drive letter that
    > >>>>> this particular user's laptop had previously assigned to his first USB
    > >>>>> drive. I told him to plug the USB drive in again, open Computer
    > >>>>> Management, and change the drive letter of the USB drive. He did this,
    > >>>>> and right away an Explorer window opened displaying the contents of
    > >>>>> his USB drive. Problem solved'
    > >>>>> Since I have never done such things these ideas sound strange to me..
    > >>>>> Meaning if the drive is malfunctioning it might have something to do
    > >>>>> with such and not a hardware fault.
    > >>>>> Although I was not using a laptop but just a desktop PC.
    > >>>>> I did found the computer management ( local) and had viewed the disk
    > >>>>> management on the right pane.
    > >>>>> Indeed there are letters that indicates one drive say for example
    > >>>>> Drive D and drive C which is easier tounderstand as well asthe Drive E
    > >>>>> and F  and so forth. Previously the Flash drive was recognized as
    > >>>>> Drive G and J as well as drive H for  another External hard drive..
    > >>>>> But now it does not recognized my flash drive.
    > >>>>> What I don't understand is why window explorer does not recognize my
    > >>>>> USB flash drive but still do with the other drives.
    > >>>>> Early this morning I was plugging these drives to the networked
    > >>>>> computer in the internet cafe and immediately it was not recognized
    > >>>>> and this kept me worried so when I arrived home I immediately plugged
    > >>>>> it and there the flash drive is not functioning or being recognized
    > >>>>> anymore.
    > >>>>> Could somebody offer me their advice how to sort this out
    > >>>>> What is going on?
    > >>>>> TIA
    > >>>>> Roy
    > >>>> Uwe Sieber has a web site, with that kind of information on it.
    > >>>>http://www.uwe-sieber.de/usbtrouble_e.html
    > >>>>  From a hardware perspective, you can verify that the plugged in
    > >>>> device is being detected (communicated with), via UVCView program
    > >>>> from Microsoft. (Use the upper right hand link, to download an
    > >>>> executable for Windows 32 bit OS.) This is an archived web page,
    > >>>> as Microsoft has taken down the download page. There have been
    > >>>> several versions of programs that look like this one, and so far,
    > >>>> this one is the most capable. (Some of the originals, had limits
    > >>>> on the number of ports they could handle.)
    > >>>>http://web.archive.org/web/20070516010130/http://www.microsoft.com/wh....
    > >>>> If the physical layer is working, and the USB device can be
    > >>>> enumerated, and fill the window with data, then the problem
    > >>>> must be at a higher level in software. (In the picture here,
    > >>>> you can see VID/PID 0x0ECD 0xA100 device has been detected, and
    > >>>> the presence of the Endpoint Descriptor presumably means a
    > >>>> communications path is set up.)
    > >>>>http://www.die.de/blog/content/binary/usbview.png
    > >>>> For resetting the USB stack, usbman.com has a page describing a
    > >>>> procedure to do in safe mode. But this doesn't necessarily fix
    > >>>> everything. There are also instances where a driver cache is
    > >>>> corrupted, or the registry is locked to updates, that might
    > >>>> cause a procedure like this to not fix anything. But in those
    > >>>> cases, searching on the exact error text, will likely lead you
    > >>>> in the right direction.
    > >>>>http://www.usbman.com/Guides/Cleanup Device Manager Safe Mode....
    > >>>> HTH,
    > >>>>      Paul- Hide quoted text -
    > >>>> - Show quoted text -
    > >>> Thanks !. sounds complicated and Microsoft is cautious about
    > >>> installing hotfixes which may not be the solution to the problem
    > >>> I did try to follow a certain procedure
    > >>>http://www.port-huron.k12.mi.us/tech/Handouts/How-To/usbflashdrivetro....
    > >>> But it when I right my computer- choose manage- Storage- disk
    > >>> management
    > >>> Then I right clicked the listed removable disk then change drive
    > >>> letter and paths
    > >>> And want to assign a new drive letter.
    > >>> I was given a warning that  changing the drive letter might cause
    > >>> problem that the hardware connected might no longer run so  stopped
    > >>> there.
    > >>> I also tried to create another drive letter but it says the letter was
    > >>> not recognized.
    > >>> Creating a new folder  needs that you need another path, but when I
    > >>> browsed I only find that there are two path- the C and D drive.
    > >>> So I got lost here and would need some suggestion from people that are
    > >>> familiar with this methods.
    > >>> Thank You!
    > >> Have a look at this page. The Drive Letter Manager
    > >> might be able to change a USB drive letter for you.
    > >> I haven't used it, because I don't have any USB flash
    > >> devices here.

    >
    > >>http://www.uwe-sieber.de/usbdlm_e.html

    >
    > >>     Paul- Hide quoted text -

    >
    > >> - Show quoted text -

    >
    > > Thanks, I will have to read first the literature about its use.
    > > BTW, is there anybody here have experience about USB drive
    > > overvoltage? What I mean I am not discounting the fact that the
    > > desktopPc might have fried circuitry  and this is an additional worry
    > > for me. I was thinking that  some computers might have higher USB
    > > voltage rating for USBs than laptops?
    > > Is there a likelihood for such to happen?
    > > I just hope that this hardware is still intact...

    >
    > The USB connector consists of +5V, GND, D+, and D-. Two power
    > signals and two data signals. The power level is a standard, whether
    > desktop or laptop. A high power device may draw up to 500mA of
    > current, and the total maximum power of 2.5 watts is just enough
    > to operate a modern 2.5" hard drive.
    >
    > A USB device can be damaged by handling, such as dropped and broken.
    > Or static discharge could damage a device. But the
    > operating voltage should be the same on each computer. And
    > the connectors seem to be well designed, at least compared to
    > some more problematic connectors (Firewire).
    >
    > The reason I wanted you to use UVCView, is to see if any low
    > level communication was happening or not. If there are no
    > endpoints and no enumeration data being shown, for a plugged
    > in USB device, it could be a hardware issue. If the right hand
    > window in UVCView has data in it, then there is hope that the
    > USB device is not completely dead.
    >
    > The foreign computer could also have malware or a virus on it,
    > and a software like that might erase the flash device. I suppose
    > a device could be "killed" by being reconfigured, but I don't understand
    > how those tools work. It is possible to change the declared size
    > of a USB flash device (fraudsters on Ebay do that), so there is
    > some kind of interface to USB flash sticks, that hackers understand.
    >
    > The only "frying" I've heard of, is Intel ICH5/ICH5R Southbridge
    > chips, can have their USB ports fail. When that happens, all the
    > USB ports on the computer, fail to operate. No plugged in device
    > will be recognized at all. You would not see any activity in UVCView.
    > In extreme cases, there will be a burn mark on the Southbridge chip on the
    > motherboard. But many of the ones reported to have
    > failed, don't have the burn mark - and that is good, because
    > if the chip is not burned by the failure, the computer
    > continues to be bootable. When it burns, it is finished, and
    > won't boot again. (I get to worry about this, because I have
    > that chip on my motherboard :) )
    >
    >     Paul- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Hello Paul...sorry for the delay, been very busy the last several days
    to visit newsgroups. I did try to download the UVC view.x86.exe. but
    never been able to finish downloading this file as it tends to hang up
    when its about 65-77% of the program has been downloaded. And it
    cannot be refreshed either as it just start from the beginning. I have
    done this so many times....but failed.
    Therefore I can't evaluate my USB drive.
    Is there any mirror for these site?
    BTW, I was starting to think about the efffect of static electricity
    on some computer hardware and got worried that this particular flash
    drive got it.
    The PC that I plugged my USB ( i found out later was home built). What
    is your opinion on this?
    Thanks
    Roy
     
    Roy, Jun 27, 2008
    #7
  8. Roy

    Paul Guest

    Roy wrote:
    > On Jun 23, 8:03 am, Paul <> wrote:
    >> Roy wrote:
    >>> On Jun 22, 6:50 pm, Paul <> wrote:
    >>>> Roy wrote:
    >>>>> On Jun 22, 4:04 pm, Paul <> wrote:
    >>>>>> Roy wrote:
    >>>>>>> Hello group
    >>>>>>> Recently I was dismayed why my USB drive was not recognized anymore
    >>>>>>> by window explorer. Therefore if I plug it on the USB slot it does
    >>>>>>> nothing. I searched the web for some ideas and came from this fellow
    >>>>>>> which states:\
    >>>>>>> 'A user of a company I know recently told me the following experience
    >>>>>>> he had with a USB flash drive. The user traveled a lot and had a
    >>>>>>> laptop that he used to connect to the company's network when he was in
    >>>>>>> the office. And he was used to plugging his flash drive into the USB
    >>>>>>> slot on his laptop so he could transfer files to another machine he
    >>>>>>> used at home. But one day he came into the office, connected his
    >>>>>>> laptop to the network, plugged in the flash drive and nothing happened
    >>>>>>> -- normally an Explorer window would open displaying the contents of
    >>>>>>> the drive. This was disconcerting, so he opened My Computer and
    >>>>>>> discovered that the USB drive wasn't there. Puzzled by this, he took
    >>>>>>> out another flash drive from his pocket and tried it, and this time it
    >>>>>>> worked fine so he knew at least the problem wasn't with his computer.
    >>>>>>> He was just about resigned to throwing out his first drive when he
    >>>>>>> decided to send me a quick email detailing the problem. My immediate
    >>>>>>> reaction too was that it was that the drive had failed, but then I
    >>>>>>> thought about it some more. One of the key steps in troubleshooting
    >>>>>>> problems is to ask what just happened. The drive failure had occurred
    >>>>>>> after he connected his machine to the network, so could it be an issue
    >>>>>>> with the network? I emailed back and suggested he disconnect his
    >>>>>>> laptop from the network and try the flash drive again, and a short
    >>>>>>> time later I received an email saying the drive now worked!
    >>>>>>> Then it dawned on me. I told him to remove the drive, connect to the
    >>>>>>> network and open My Computer again and look for something different.
    >>>>>>> He did this and told me there was a new mapped network drive that he
    >>>>>>> hadn't seen before. Aha! The network administrator must have modified
    >>>>>>> their logon script to map a new drive on users' computers, and this
    >>>>>>> new mapped drive probably assigned the very same drive letter that
    >>>>>>> this particular user's laptop had previously assigned to his first USB
    >>>>>>> drive. I told him to plug the USB drive in again, open Computer
    >>>>>>> Management, and change the drive letter of the USB drive. He did this,
    >>>>>>> and right away an Explorer window opened displaying the contents of
    >>>>>>> his USB drive. Problem solved'
    >>>>>>> Since I have never done such things these ideas sound strange to me.
    >>>>>>> Meaning if the drive is malfunctioning it might have something to do
    >>>>>>> with such and not a hardware fault.
    >>>>>>> Although I was not using a laptop but just a desktop PC.
    >>>>>>> I did found the computer management ( local) and had viewed the disk
    >>>>>>> management on the right pane.
    >>>>>>> Indeed there are letters that indicates one drive say for example
    >>>>>>> Drive D and drive C which is easier tounderstand as well asthe Drive E
    >>>>>>> and F and so forth. Previously the Flash drive was recognized as
    >>>>>>> Drive G and J as well as drive H for another External hard drive.
    >>>>>>> But now it does not recognized my flash drive.
    >>>>>>> What I don't understand is why window explorer does not recognize my
    >>>>>>> USB flash drive but still do with the other drives.
    >>>>>>> Early this morning I was plugging these drives to the networked
    >>>>>>> computer in the internet cafe and immediately it was not recognized
    >>>>>>> and this kept me worried so when I arrived home I immediately plugged
    >>>>>>> it and there the flash drive is not functioning or being recognized
    >>>>>>> anymore.
    >>>>>>> Could somebody offer me their advice how to sort this out
    >>>>>>> What is going on?
    >>>>>>> TIA
    >>>>>>> Roy
    >>>>>> Uwe Sieber has a web site, with that kind of information on it.
    >>>>>> http://www.uwe-sieber.de/usbtrouble_e.html
    >>>>>> From a hardware perspective, you can verify that the plugged in
    >>>>>> device is being detected (communicated with), via UVCView program
    >>>>>> from Microsoft. (Use the upper right hand link, to download an
    >>>>>> executable for Windows 32 bit OS.) This is an archived web page,
    >>>>>> as Microsoft has taken down the download page. There have been
    >>>>>> several versions of programs that look like this one, and so far,
    >>>>>> this one is the most capable. (Some of the originals, had limits
    >>>>>> on the number of ports they could handle.)
    >>>>>> http://web.archive.org/web/20070516010130/http://www.microsoft.com/wh...
    >>>>>> If the physical layer is working, and the USB device can be
    >>>>>> enumerated, and fill the window with data, then the problem
    >>>>>> must be at a higher level in software. (In the picture here,
    >>>>>> you can see VID/PID 0x0ECD 0xA100 device has been detected, and
    >>>>>> the presence of the Endpoint Descriptor presumably means a
    >>>>>> communications path is set up.)
    >>>>>> http://www.die.de/blog/content/binary/usbview.png
    >>>>>> For resetting the USB stack, usbman.com has a page describing a
    >>>>>> procedure to do in safe mode. But this doesn't necessarily fix
    >>>>>> everything. There are also instances where a driver cache is
    >>>>>> corrupted, or the registry is locked to updates, that might
    >>>>>> cause a procedure like this to not fix anything. But in those
    >>>>>> cases, searching on the exact error text, will likely lead you
    >>>>>> in the right direction.
    >>>>>> http://www.usbman.com/Guides/Cleanup Device Manager Safe Mode...
    >>>>>> HTH,
    >>>>>> Paul- Hide quoted text -
    >>>>>> - Show quoted text -
    >>>>> Thanks !. sounds complicated and Microsoft is cautious about
    >>>>> installing hotfixes which may not be the solution to the problem
    >>>>> I did try to follow a certain procedure
    >>>>> http://www.port-huron.k12.mi.us/tech/Handouts/How-To/usbflashdrivetro...
    >>>>> But it when I right my computer- choose manage- Storage- disk
    >>>>> management
    >>>>> Then I right clicked the listed removable disk then change drive
    >>>>> letter and paths
    >>>>> And want to assign a new drive letter.
    >>>>> I was given a warning that changing the drive letter might cause
    >>>>> problem that the hardware connected might no longer run so stopped
    >>>>> there.
    >>>>> I also tried to create another drive letter but it says the letter was
    >>>>> not recognized.
    >>>>> Creating a new folder needs that you need another path, but when I
    >>>>> browsed I only find that there are two path- the C and D drive.
    >>>>> So I got lost here and would need some suggestion from people that are
    >>>>> familiar with this methods.
    >>>>> Thank You!
    >>>> Have a look at this page. The Drive Letter Manager
    >>>> might be able to change a USB drive letter for you.
    >>>> I haven't used it, because I don't have any USB flash
    >>>> devices here.
    >>>> http://www.uwe-sieber.de/usbdlm_e.html
    >>>> Paul- Hide quoted text -
    >>>> - Show quoted text -
    >>> Thanks, I will have to read first the literature about its use.
    >>> BTW, is there anybody here have experience about USB drive
    >>> overvoltage? What I mean I am not discounting the fact that the
    >>> desktopPc might have fried circuitry and this is an additional worry
    >>> for me. I was thinking that some computers might have higher USB
    >>> voltage rating for USBs than laptops?
    >>> Is there a likelihood for such to happen?
    >>> I just hope that this hardware is still intact...

    >> The USB connector consists of +5V, GND, D+, and D-. Two power
    >> signals and two data signals. The power level is a standard, whether
    >> desktop or laptop. A high power device may draw up to 500mA of
    >> current, and the total maximum power of 2.5 watts is just enough
    >> to operate a modern 2.5" hard drive.
    >>
    >> A USB device can be damaged by handling, such as dropped and broken.
    >> Or static discharge could damage a device. But the
    >> operating voltage should be the same on each computer. And
    >> the connectors seem to be well designed, at least compared to
    >> some more problematic connectors (Firewire).
    >>
    >> The reason I wanted you to use UVCView, is to see if any low
    >> level communication was happening or not. If there are no
    >> endpoints and no enumeration data being shown, for a plugged
    >> in USB device, it could be a hardware issue. If the right hand
    >> window in UVCView has data in it, then there is hope that the
    >> USB device is not completely dead.
    >>
    >> The foreign computer could also have malware or a virus on it,
    >> and a software like that might erase the flash device. I suppose
    >> a device could be "killed" by being reconfigured, but I don't understand
    >> how those tools work. It is possible to change the declared size
    >> of a USB flash device (fraudsters on Ebay do that), so there is
    >> some kind of interface to USB flash sticks, that hackers understand.
    >>
    >> The only "frying" I've heard of, is Intel ICH5/ICH5R Southbridge
    >> chips, can have their USB ports fail. When that happens, all the
    >> USB ports on the computer, fail to operate. No plugged in device
    >> will be recognized at all. You would not see any activity in UVCView.
    >> In extreme cases, there will be a burn mark on the Southbridge chip on the
    >> motherboard. But many of the ones reported to have
    >> failed, don't have the burn mark - and that is good, because
    >> if the chip is not burned by the failure, the computer
    >> continues to be bootable. When it burns, it is finished, and
    >> won't boot again. (I get to worry about this, because I have
    >> that chip on my motherboard :) )
    >>
    >> Paul- Hide quoted text -
    >>
    >> - Show quoted text -

    >
    > Hello Paul...sorry for the delay, been very busy the last several days
    > to visit newsgroups. I did try to download the UVC view.x86.exe. but
    > never been able to finish downloading this file as it tends to hang up
    > when its about 65-77% of the program has been downloaded. And it
    > cannot be refreshed either as it just start from the beginning. I have
    > done this so many times....but failed.
    > Therefore I can't evaluate my USB drive.
    > Is there any mirror for these site?
    > BTW, I was starting to think about the efffect of static electricity
    > on some computer hardware and got worried that this particular flash
    > drive got it.
    > The PC that I plugged my USB ( i found out later was home built). What
    > is your opinion on this?
    > Thanks
    > Roy


    If the PC is home built, there is a small chance the port is miswired.
    But the owner would have his/her pile of dead USB devices, if that
    were the case.

    As for UVCView, the page used to be on the Microsoft site, and was probably
    there for a while. It could have been part of some SDK or kit that goes
    with a Microsoft product, so there are alternate ways to get the tool.
    I was surprised to find that the page was still available on web.archive.org ,
    so I've been pointing people there to get a copy.

    For the download link itself, this would be the index page. The archive.org
    site took snapshots five times. And what usually happens, is it actually only
    archives one copy (as long as the other four are detected to be duplicates).
    So clicking any one of the five links here, should start a download. Maybe
    you'll get lucky.

    http://web.archive.org/*/http://dow...f-a31d-436b-9281-92cdfeae4b45/UVCView.x86.exe

    I clicked on the May 9, 2006 link just now. There was a slight pause, before
    the dialog came up to save the file. The file downloaded in about five seconds,
    and file size is 167,231 bytes. I have another copy which is 167,232 bytes.
    Both seem to work OK. The bigger file has an extra 0x00 byte at the end of
    the file. The above executable will run the program immediately, without
    installing anything.

    Good luck,
    Paul
     
    Paul, Jun 28, 2008
    #8
  9. Roy

    Roy Guest

    On Jun 28, 8:51 am, Paul <> wrote:
    > Roy wrote:
    > > On Jun 23, 8:03 am, Paul <> wrote:
    > >> Roy wrote:
    > >>> On Jun 22, 6:50 pm, Paul <> wrote:
    > >>>> Roy wrote:
    > >>>>> On Jun 22, 4:04 pm, Paul <> wrote:
    > >>>>>> Roy wrote:
    > >>>>>>> Hello group
    > >>>>>>> Recently I  was dismayed why my USB drive was not recognized anymore
    > >>>>>>> by window explorer. Therefore if I  plug it on the USB slot it does
    > >>>>>>> nothing. I searched the web for some ideas and came from this fellow
    > >>>>>>> which states:\
    > >>>>>>> 'A user of a company I know recently told me the following experience
    > >>>>>>> he had with a USB flash drive. The user traveled a lot and had a
    > >>>>>>> laptop that he used to connect to the company's network when he was in
    > >>>>>>> the office. And he was used to plugging his flash drive into the USB
    > >>>>>>> slot on his laptop so he could transfer files to another machine he
    > >>>>>>> used at home. But one day he came into the office, connected his
    > >>>>>>> laptop to the network, plugged in the flash drive and nothing happened
    > >>>>>>> -- normally an Explorer window would open displaying the contentsof
    > >>>>>>> the drive. This was disconcerting, so he opened My Computer and
    > >>>>>>> discovered that the USB drive wasn't there. Puzzled by this, he took
    > >>>>>>> out another flash drive from his pocket and tried it, and this time it
    > >>>>>>> worked fine so he knew at least the problem wasn't with his computer.
    > >>>>>>> He was just about resigned to throwing out his first drive when he
    > >>>>>>> decided to send me a quick email detailing the problem. My immediate
    > >>>>>>> reaction too was that it was that the drive had failed, but then I
    > >>>>>>> thought about it some more. One of the key steps in troubleshooting
    > >>>>>>> problems is to ask what just happened. The drive failure had occurred
    > >>>>>>> after he connected his machine to the network, so could it be an issue
    > >>>>>>> with the network? I emailed back and suggested he disconnect his
    > >>>>>>> laptop from the network and try the flash drive again, and a short
    > >>>>>>> time later I received an email saying the drive now worked!
    > >>>>>>> Then it dawned on me. I told him to remove the drive, connect to the
    > >>>>>>> network and open My Computer again and look for something different.
    > >>>>>>> He did this and told me there was a new mapped network drive thathe
    > >>>>>>> hadn't seen before. Aha! The network administrator must have modified
    > >>>>>>> their logon script to map a new drive on users' computers, and this
    > >>>>>>> new mapped drive probably assigned the very same drive letter that
    > >>>>>>> this particular user's laptop had previously assigned to his first USB
    > >>>>>>> drive. I told him to plug the USB drive in again, open Computer
    > >>>>>>> Management, and change the drive letter of the USB drive. He did this,
    > >>>>>>> and right away an Explorer window opened displaying the contents of
    > >>>>>>> his USB drive. Problem solved'
    > >>>>>>> Since I have never done such things these ideas sound strange to me.
    > >>>>>>> Meaning if the drive is malfunctioning it might have something todo
    > >>>>>>> with such and not a hardware fault.
    > >>>>>>> Although I was not using a laptop but just a desktop PC.
    > >>>>>>> I did found the computer management ( local) and had viewed the disk
    > >>>>>>> management on the right pane.
    > >>>>>>> Indeed there are letters that indicates one drive say for example
    > >>>>>>> Drive D and drive C which is easier tounderstand as well asthe Drive E
    > >>>>>>> and F  and so forth. Previously the Flash drive was recognized as
    > >>>>>>> Drive G and J as well as drive H for  another External hard drive.
    > >>>>>>> But now it does not recognized my flash drive.
    > >>>>>>> What I don't understand is why window explorer does not recognizemy
    > >>>>>>> USB flash drive but still do with the other drives.
    > >>>>>>> Early this morning I was plugging these drives to the networked
    > >>>>>>> computer in the internet cafe and immediately it was not recognized
    > >>>>>>> and this kept me worried so when I arrived home I immediately plugged
    > >>>>>>> it and there the flash drive is not functioning or being recognized
    > >>>>>>> anymore.
    > >>>>>>> Could somebody offer me their advice how to sort this out
    > >>>>>>> What is going on?
    > >>>>>>> TIA
    > >>>>>>> Roy
    > >>>>>> Uwe Sieber has a web site, with that kind of information on it.
    > >>>>>>http://www.uwe-sieber.de/usbtrouble_e.html
    > >>>>>>  From a hardware perspective, you can verify that the plugged in
    > >>>>>> device is being detected (communicated with), via UVCView program
    > >>>>>> from Microsoft. (Use the upper right hand link, to download an
    > >>>>>> executable for Windows 32 bit OS.) This is an archived web page,
    > >>>>>> as Microsoft has taken down the download page. There have been
    > >>>>>> several versions of programs that look like this one, and so far,
    > >>>>>> this one is the most capable. (Some of the originals, had limits
    > >>>>>> on the number of ports they could handle.)
    > >>>>>>http://web.archive.org/web/20070516010130/http://www.microsoft.com/wh...
    > >>>>>> If the physical layer is working, and the USB device can be
    > >>>>>> enumerated, and fill the window with data, then the problem
    > >>>>>> must be at a higher level in software. (In the picture here,
    > >>>>>> you can see VID/PID 0x0ECD 0xA100 device has been detected, and
    > >>>>>> the presence of the Endpoint Descriptor presumably means a
    > >>>>>> communications path is set up.)
    > >>>>>>http://www.die.de/blog/content/binary/usbview.png
    > >>>>>> For resetting the USB stack, usbman.com has a page describing a
    > >>>>>> procedure to do in safe mode. But this doesn't necessarily fix
    > >>>>>> everything. There are also instances where a driver cache is
    > >>>>>> corrupted, or the registry is locked to updates, that might
    > >>>>>> cause a procedure like this to not fix anything. But in those
    > >>>>>> cases, searching on the exact error text, will likely lead you
    > >>>>>> in the right direction.
    > >>>>>>http://www.usbman.com/Guides/Cleanup Device Manager Safe Mode...
    > >>>>>> HTH,
    > >>>>>>      Paul- Hide quoted text -
    > >>>>>> - Show quoted text -
    > >>>>> Thanks !. sounds complicated and Microsoft is cautious about
    > >>>>> installing hotfixes which may not be the solution to the problem
    > >>>>> I did try to follow a certain procedure
    > >>>>>http://www.port-huron.k12.mi.us/tech/Handouts/How-To/usbflashdrivetro...
    > >>>>> But it when I right my computer- choose manage- Storage- disk
    > >>>>> management
    > >>>>> Then I right clicked the listed removable disk then change drive
    > >>>>> letter and paths
    > >>>>> And want to assign a new drive letter.
    > >>>>> I was given a warning that  changing the drive letter might cause
    > >>>>> problem that the hardware connected might no longer run so  stopped
    > >>>>> there.
    > >>>>> I also tried to create another drive letter but it says the letter was
    > >>>>> not recognized.
    > >>>>> Creating a new folder  needs that you need another path, but whenI
    > >>>>> browsed I only find that there are two path- the C and D drive.
    > >>>>> So I got lost here and would need some suggestion from people that are
    > >>>>> familiar with this methods.
    > >>>>> Thank You!
    > >>>> Have a look at this page. The Drive Letter Manager
    > >>>> might be able to change a USB drive letter for you.
    > >>>> I haven't used it, because I don't have any USB flash
    > >>>> devices here.
    > >>>>http://www.uwe-sieber.de/usbdlm_e.html
    > >>>>     Paul- Hide quoted text -
    > >>>> - Show quoted text -
    > >>> Thanks, I will have to read first the literature about its use.
    > >>> BTW, is there anybody here have experience about USB drive
    > >>> overvoltage? What I mean I am not discounting the fact that the
    > >>> desktopPc might have fried circuitry  and this is an additional worry
    > >>> for me. I was thinking that  some computers might have higher USB
    > >>> voltage rating for USBs than laptops?
    > >>> Is there a likelihood for such to happen?
    > >>> I just hope that this hardware is still intact...
    > >> The USB connector consists of +5V, GND, D+, and D-. Two power
    > >> signals and two data signals. The power level is a standard, whether
    > >> desktop or laptop. A high power device may draw up to 500mA of
    > >> current, and the total maximum power of 2.5 watts is just enough
    > >> to operate a modern 2.5" hard drive.

    >
    > >> A USB device can be damaged by handling, such as dropped and broken.
    > >> Or static discharge could damage a device. But the
    > >> operating voltage should be the same on each computer. And
    > >> the connectors seem to be well designed, at least compared to
    > >> some more problematic connectors (Firewire).

    >
    > >> The reason I wanted you to use UVCView, is to see if any low
    > >> level communication was happening or not. If there are no
    > >> endpoints and no enumeration data being shown, for a plugged
    > >> in USB device, it could be a hardware issue. If the right hand
    > >> window in UVCView has data in it, then there is hope that the
    > >> USB device is not completely dead.

    >
    > >> The foreign computer could also have malware or a virus on it,
    > >> and a software like that might erase the flash device. I suppose
    > >> a device could be "killed" by being reconfigured, but I don't understand
    > >> how those tools work. It is possible to change the declared size
    > >> of a USB flash device (fraudsters on Ebay do that), so there is
    > >> some kind of interface to USB flash sticks, that hackers understand.

    >
    > >> The only "frying" I've heard of, is Intel ICH5/ICH5R Southbridge
    > >> chips, can have their USB ports fail. When that happens, all the
    > >> USB ports on the computer, fail to operate. No plugged in device
    > >> will be recognized at all. You would not see any activity in UVCView.
    > >> In extreme cases, there will be a burn mark on the Southbridge chip onthe
    > >> motherboard. But many of the ones reported to have
    > >> failed, don't have the burn mark - and that is good, because
    > >> if the chip is not burned by the failure, the computer
    > >> continues to be bootable. When it burns, it is finished, and
    > >> won't boot again. (I get to worry about this, because I have
    > >> that chip on my motherboard :) )

    >
    > >>     Paul- Hide quoted text -

    >
    > >> - Show quoted text -

    >
    > > Hello Paul...sorry for the delay, been very busy the last several days
    > > to visit newsgroups. I did try to download the UVC view.x86.exe. but
    > > never been able to finish downloading this file as it tends to hang up
    > > when its about 65-77% of the program has been downloaded. And it
    > > cannot be refreshed either as it just start from the beginning. I have
    > > done this so many times....but failed.
    > > Therefore I can't evaluate my USB drive.
    > > Is there any mirror for these  site?
    > > BTW, I was starting to think about the efffect of static electricity
    > > on  some computer hardware and got worried that this particular flash
    > > drive got it.
    > > The PC that I plugged my USB ( i found out later was home built). What
    > > is your opinion on this?
    > > Thanks
    > > Roy

    >
    > If the PC is home built, there is a small chance the port is miswired.
    > But the owner would have his/her pile of dead USB devices, if that
    > were the case.
    >
    > As for UVCView, the page used to be on the Microsoft site, and was probably
    > there for a while. It could have been part of some SDK or kit that goes
    > with a Microsoft product, so there are alternate ways to get the tool.
    > I was surprised to find that the page was still available on web.archive.org ,
    > so I've been pointing people there to get a copy.
    >
    > For the download link itself, this would be the index page. The archive.org
    > site took snapshots five times. And what usually happens, is it actually only
    > archives one copy (as long as the other four are detected to be duplicates).
    > So clicking any one of the five links here, should start a download. Maybe
    > you'll get lucky.
    >
    > http://web.archive.org/*/http://download.microsoft.com/download/e/b/a...
    >
    > I clicked on the May 9, 2006 link just now. There was a slight pause, before
    > the dialog came up to save the file. The file downloaded in about five seconds,
    > and file size is 167,231 bytes. I have another copy which is 167,232 bytes.
    > Both seem to work OK. The bigger file has an extra 0x00 byte at the end of
    > the file. The above executable will run the program immediately, without
    > installing anything.
    >
    > Good luck,
    >     Paul


    Hello Paul
    I was able to downloaded the file and immediately run it but
    regardless if the USBflash drive plugged is suspected to be defective
    or intact , it does not react...Is there a special way to run this
    software?
    Thanks
    Roy
     
    Roy, Jun 28, 2008
    #9
  10. Roy

    Paul Guest

    Roy wrote:

    >
    > Hello Paul
    > I was able to downloaded the file and immediately run it but
    > regardless if the USBflash drive plugged is suspected to be defective
    > or intact , it does not react...Is there a special way to run this
    > software?
    > Thanks
    > Roy


    If there is no reaction, then the USB flash is dead. It could be that
    there is a break in where the connector meets the PCB, inside the flash
    packaging.

    You should also test, with a known to be working USB device. That
    will demonstrate how the program is supposed to work, and also prove
    there isn't a problem with the USB ports on the computer you are
    using for this testing.

    I also use a couple Linux LiveCD distributions, for hardware testing.
    Knoppix (knopper.net) and Ubuntu (ubuntu.com), can be booted from
    their respective CDs, without installing any software on the hard
    drive. Using programs like dmesg, lspci, and lsusb in Linux, you
    can list/enumerate the hardware that the OS can "see". But UVCView
    should be doing the same thing, with a much smaller investment
    in time and effort. Those Linux distributions, are a 700MB download.
    Any time I need to prove "it's a hardware problem", I boot one of
    the Linux CDs, and see if the symptoms look the same. For example,
    my first computer had a video (AGP) problem, and the symptoms
    existed in both Windows and Linux.

    Paul
     
    Paul, Jun 28, 2008
    #10
  11. Roy

    Roy Guest

    On Jun 28, 9:41 pm, Paul <> wrote:
    > Roy wrote:
    >
    > > Hello Paul
    > > I was able to downloaded the file and immediately run it but
    > > regardless if the USBflash drive plugged  is suspected to be defective
    > > or intact , it does not react...Is there a special way to run this
    > > software?
    > > Thanks
    > > Roy

    >
    > If there is no reaction, then the USB flash is dead. It could be that
    > there is a break in where the connector meets the PCB, inside the flash
    > packaging.
    >
    > You should also test, with a known to be working USB device. That
    > will demonstrate how the program is supposed to work, and also prove
    > there isn't a problem with the USB ports on the computer you are
    > using for this testing.
    >
    > I also use a couple Linux LiveCD distributions, for hardware testing.
    > Knoppix (knopper.net) and Ubuntu (ubuntu.com), can be booted from
    > their respective CDs, without installing any software on the hard
    > drive. Using programs like dmesg, lspci, and lsusb in Linux, you
    > can list/enumerate the hardware that the OS can "see". But UVCView
    > should be doing the same thing, with a much smaller investment
    > in time and effort. Those Linux distributions, are a 700MB download.
    > Any time I need to prove "it's a hardware problem", I boot one of
    > the Linux CDs, and see if the symptoms look the same. For example,
    > my first computer had a video (AGP) problem, and the symptoms
    > existed in both Windows and Linux.
    >
    >     Paul


    I did try using a working USB device such as the flash drive,
    wireless mouse dongle, it does not react... or does it need more time
    for its operation? Whenever I click the close icon it states that "
    windows cannot close the program, it may need more time for its
    operation etc".

    Further
    the caption says:
    16 Bit MS-DOS Subsystem
    D:\UVCVIE~1.EXE
    C:\DOCUME~\ROYBAS~1\LOCALS~1Temp\. A temporary file needed for
    initialization could not be created or could not be written to. Make
    sure that the directory path exists, and disk space is available.
    Click close to terminate the application
    This surprises me is as I never experienced this with previous command
    prompt application.
    I don't understand why would it have an issue of disk space when I
    still have 35 gigs of free space in my hard drive
    BTW Sorry
    I am not familiar with linux applicationeither..
    Roy
     
    Roy, Jun 28, 2008
    #11
  12. Roy

    Paul Guest

    Roy wrote:
    > On Jun 28, 9:41 pm, Paul <> wrote:
    >> Roy wrote:
    >>
    >>> Hello Paul
    >>> I was able to downloaded the file and immediately run it but
    >>> regardless if the USBflash drive plugged is suspected to be defective
    >>> or intact , it does not react...Is there a special way to run this
    >>> software?
    >>> Thanks
    >>> Roy

    >> If there is no reaction, then the USB flash is dead. It could be that
    >> there is a break in where the connector meets the PCB, inside the flash
    >> packaging.
    >>
    >> You should also test, with a known to be working USB device. That
    >> will demonstrate how the program is supposed to work, and also prove
    >> there isn't a problem with the USB ports on the computer you are
    >> using for this testing.
    >>
    >> I also use a couple Linux LiveCD distributions, for hardware testing.
    >> Knoppix (knopper.net) and Ubuntu (ubuntu.com), can be booted from
    >> their respective CDs, without installing any software on the hard
    >> drive. Using programs like dmesg, lspci, and lsusb in Linux, you
    >> can list/enumerate the hardware that the OS can "see". But UVCView
    >> should be doing the same thing, with a much smaller investment
    >> in time and effort. Those Linux distributions, are a 700MB download.
    >> Any time I need to prove "it's a hardware problem", I boot one of
    >> the Linux CDs, and see if the symptoms look the same. For example,
    >> my first computer had a video (AGP) problem, and the symptoms
    >> existed in both Windows and Linux.
    >>
    >> Paul

    >
    > I did try using a working USB device such as the flash drive,
    > wireless mouse dongle, it does not react... or does it need more time
    > for its operation? Whenever I click the close icon it states that "
    > windows cannot close the program, it may need more time for its
    > operation etc".
    >
    > Further
    > the caption says:
    > 16 Bit MS-DOS Subsystem
    > D:\UVCVIE~1.EXE
    > C:\DOCUME~\ROYBAS~1\LOCALS~1Temp\. A temporary file needed for
    > initialization could not be created or could not be written to. Make
    > sure that the directory path exists, and disk space is available.
    > Click close to terminate the application
    > This surprises me is as I never experienced this with previous command
    > prompt application.
    > I don't understand why would it have an issue of disk space when I
    > still have 35 gigs of free space in my hard drive
    > BTW Sorry
    > I am not familiar with linux applicationeither..
    > Roy


    UVCView.x86.exe should execute immediately when you double click it in
    a folder window. File size is 167,231 bytes. It is not a DOS program.

    When it starts, it should look very similar to this.

    http://www.die.de/blog/content/binary/usbview.png

    I don't know right off hand, what versions of Windows it supports.
    I'm using it on Win2K right now, and it is fine. Something else
    is going on with your system, would be my guess. Are you seeing
    any other strange problems, or is this the only one ?

    Paul
     
    Paul, Jun 28, 2008
    #12
  13. Roy

    Roy Guest

    On Jun 29, 5:23 am, Paul <> wrote:
    > Roy wrote:
    > > On Jun 28, 9:41 pm, Paul <> wrote:
    > >> Roy wrote:

    >
    > >>> Hello Paul
    > >>> I was able to downloaded the file and immediately run it but
    > >>> regardless if the USBflash drive plugged  is suspected to be defective
    > >>> or intact , it does not react...Is there a special way to run this
    > >>> software?
    > >>> Thanks
    > >>> Roy
    > >> If there is no reaction, then the USB flash is dead. It could be that
    > >> there is a break in where the connector meets the PCB, inside the flash
    > >> packaging.

    >
    > >> You should also test, with a known to be working USB device. That
    > >> will demonstrate how the program is supposed to work, and also prove
    > >> there isn't a problem with the USB ports on the computer you are
    > >> using for this testing.

    >
    > >> I also use a couple Linux LiveCD distributions, for hardware testing.
    > >> Knoppix (knopper.net) and Ubuntu (ubuntu.com), can be booted from
    > >> their respective CDs, without installing any software on the hard
    > >> drive. Using programs like dmesg, lspci, and lsusb in Linux, you
    > >> can list/enumerate the hardware that the OS can "see". But UVCView
    > >> should be doing the same thing, with a much smaller investment
    > >> in time and effort. Those Linux distributions, are a 700MB download.
    > >> Any time I need to prove "it's a hardware problem", I boot one of
    > >> the Linux CDs, and see if the symptoms look the same. For example,
    > >> my first computer had a video (AGP) problem, and the symptoms
    > >> existed in both Windows and Linux.

    >
    > >>     Paul

    >
    > > I did try using a working USB device such as the  flash drive,
    > > wireless mouse dongle, it does not react... or does it need more time
    > > for its operation? Whenever I click the close icon it states that "
    > > windows cannot close the program, it may need more time for its
    > > operation etc".

    >
    > > Further
    > > the caption says:
    > > 16 Bit MS-DOS Subsystem
    > > D:\UVCVIE~1.EXE
    > > C:\DOCUME~\ROYBAS~1\LOCALS~1Temp\. A temporary file needed for
    > > initialization could not be created or could not be written to. Make
    > > sure that the directory path exists, and disk space is available.
    > > Click close to terminate the application
    > > This surprises me is as I never experienced this with previous command
    > > prompt application.
    > > I don't understand why would it have an issue of disk space when I
    > > still have 35 gigs of free space in my hard drive
    > > BTW Sorry
    > > I am not familiar with linux  applicationeither..
    > > Roy

    >
    > UVCView.x86.exe should execute immediately when you double click it in
    > a folder window. File size is 167,231 bytes. It is not a DOS program.
    >
    > When it starts, it should look very similar to this.
    >
    > http://www.die.de/blog/content/binary/usbview.png
    >
    > I don't know right off hand, what versions of Windows it supports.
    > I'm using it on Win2K right now, and it is fine. Something else
    > is going on with your system, would be my guess. Are you seeing
    > any other strange problems, or is this the only one ?
    >
    >     Paul- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    I have never experienced such peculiarities with other programs and
    only with that UVCvie...
    My PC is run by WinXP Sp2.
    I could never get it to display the appearance that you showed here
    http://www.die.de/blog/content/binary/usbview.png
     
    Roy, Jun 29, 2008
    #13
  14. Roy

    Paul Guest

    Roy wrote:
    > On Jun 29, 5:23 am, Paul <> wrote:
    >> Roy wrote:
    >>> On Jun 28, 9:41 pm, Paul <> wrote:
    >>>> Roy wrote:
    >>>>> Hello Paul
    >>>>> I was able to downloaded the file and immediately run it but
    >>>>> regardless if the USBflash drive plugged is suspected to be defective
    >>>>> or intact , it does not react...Is there a special way to run this
    >>>>> software?
    >>>>> Thanks
    >>>>> Roy
    >>>> If there is no reaction, then the USB flash is dead. It could be that
    >>>> there is a break in where the connector meets the PCB, inside the flash
    >>>> packaging.
    >>>> You should also test, with a known to be working USB device. That
    >>>> will demonstrate how the program is supposed to work, and also prove
    >>>> there isn't a problem with the USB ports on the computer you are
    >>>> using for this testing.
    >>>> I also use a couple Linux LiveCD distributions, for hardware testing.
    >>>> Knoppix (knopper.net) and Ubuntu (ubuntu.com), can be booted from
    >>>> their respective CDs, without installing any software on the hard
    >>>> drive. Using programs like dmesg, lspci, and lsusb in Linux, you
    >>>> can list/enumerate the hardware that the OS can "see". But UVCView
    >>>> should be doing the same thing, with a much smaller investment
    >>>> in time and effort. Those Linux distributions, are a 700MB download.
    >>>> Any time I need to prove "it's a hardware problem", I boot one of
    >>>> the Linux CDs, and see if the symptoms look the same. For example,
    >>>> my first computer had a video (AGP) problem, and the symptoms
    >>>> existed in both Windows and Linux.
    >>>> Paul
    >>> I did try using a working USB device such as the flash drive,
    >>> wireless mouse dongle, it does not react... or does it need more time
    >>> for its operation? Whenever I click the close icon it states that "
    >>> windows cannot close the program, it may need more time for its
    >>> operation etc".
    >>> Further
    >>> the caption says:
    >>> 16 Bit MS-DOS Subsystem
    >>> D:\UVCVIE~1.EXE
    >>> C:\DOCUME~\ROYBAS~1\LOCALS~1Temp\. A temporary file needed for
    >>> initialization could not be created or could not be written to. Make
    >>> sure that the directory path exists, and disk space is available.
    >>> Click close to terminate the application
    >>> This surprises me is as I never experienced this with previous command
    >>> prompt application.
    >>> I don't understand why would it have an issue of disk space when I
    >>> still have 35 gigs of free space in my hard drive
    >>> BTW Sorry
    >>> I am not familiar with linux applicationeither..
    >>> Roy

    >> UVCView.x86.exe should execute immediately when you double click it in
    >> a folder window. File size is 167,231 bytes. It is not a DOS program.
    >>
    >> When it starts, it should look very similar to this.
    >>
    >> http://www.die.de/blog/content/binary/usbview.png
    >>
    >> I don't know right off hand, what versions of Windows it supports.
    >> I'm using it on Win2K right now, and it is fine. Something else
    >> is going on with your system, would be my guess. Are you seeing
    >> any other strange problems, or is this the only one ?
    >>
    >> Paul- Hide quoted text -
    >>
    >> - Show quoted text -

    >
    > I have never experienced such peculiarities with other programs and
    > only with that UVCvie...
    > My PC is run by WinXP Sp2.
    > I could never get it to display the appearance that you showed here
    > http://www.die.de/blog/content/binary/usbview.png
    >


    I've been looking for another copy, and there is one here.

    ftp://ftp.efo.ru/pub/ftdichip/Utilities/

    File size is 167,232 bytes.
    MD5sum is 93244d84d79314898e62d21cecc4ca5e

    The MD5sum matches the download from the Microsoft site, so seems
    to be legitimate. Give that one a try and see if the behavior is
    any different.

    Maybe someone else understands the significance of -

    "16 Bit MS-DOS Subsystem"

    because I don't. Presumably it is an important clue. I'd
    almost suspect malware, or alternately, an important file
    on your C: drive is corrupted. I tried looking on the
    Microsoft site, and so far, don't see an exact match
    for the symptoms.

    Paul
     
    Paul, Jun 29, 2008
    #14
  15. Roy

    Roy Guest

    On Jun 29, 1:05 pm, Paul <> wrote:
    > Roy wrote:
    > > On Jun 29, 5:23 am, Paul <> wrote:
    > >> Roy wrote:
    > >>> On Jun 28, 9:41 pm, Paul <> wrote:
    > >>>> Roy wrote:
    > >>>>> Hello Paul
    > >>>>> I was able to downloaded the file and immediately run it but
    > >>>>> regardless if the USBflash drive plugged  is suspected to be defective
    > >>>>> or intact , it does not react...Is there a special way to run this
    > >>>>> software?
    > >>>>> Thanks
    > >>>>> Roy
    > >>>> If there is no reaction, then the USB flash is dead. It could be that
    > >>>> there is a break in where the connector meets the PCB, inside the flash
    > >>>> packaging.
    > >>>> You should also test, with a known to be working USB device. That
    > >>>> will demonstrate how the program is supposed to work, and also prove
    > >>>> there isn't a problem with the USB ports on the computer you are
    > >>>> using for this testing.
    > >>>> I also use a couple Linux LiveCD distributions, for hardware testing.
    > >>>> Knoppix (knopper.net) and Ubuntu (ubuntu.com), can be booted from
    > >>>> their respective CDs, without installing any software on the hard
    > >>>> drive. Using programs like dmesg, lspci, and lsusb in Linux, you
    > >>>> can list/enumerate the hardware that the OS can "see". But UVCView
    > >>>> should be doing the same thing, with a much smaller investment
    > >>>> in time and effort. Those Linux distributions, are a 700MB download.
    > >>>> Any time I need to prove "it's a hardware problem", I boot one of
    > >>>> the Linux CDs, and see if the symptoms look the same. For example,
    > >>>> my first computer had a video (AGP) problem, and the symptoms
    > >>>> existed in both Windows and Linux.
    > >>>>     Paul
    > >>> I did try using a working USB device such as the  flash drive,
    > >>> wireless mouse dongle, it does not react... or does it need more time
    > >>> for its operation? Whenever I click the close icon it states that "
    > >>> windows cannot close the program, it may need more time for its
    > >>> operation etc".
    > >>> Further
    > >>> the caption says:
    > >>> 16 Bit MS-DOS Subsystem
    > >>> D:\UVCVIE~1.EXE
    > >>> C:\DOCUME~\ROYBAS~1\LOCALS~1Temp\. A temporary file needed for
    > >>> initialization could not be created or could not be written to. Make
    > >>> sure that the directory path exists, and disk space is available.
    > >>> Click close to terminate the application
    > >>> This surprises me is as I never experienced this with previous command
    > >>> prompt application.
    > >>> I don't understand why would it have an issue of disk space when I
    > >>> still have 35 gigs of free space in my hard drive
    > >>> BTW Sorry
    > >>> I am not familiar with linux  applicationeither..
    > >>> Roy
    > >> UVCView.x86.exe should execute immediately when you double click it in
    > >> a folder window. File size is 167,231 bytes. It is not a DOS program.

    >
    > >> When it starts, it should look very similar to this.

    >
    > >>http://www.die.de/blog/content/binary/usbview.png

    >
    > >> I don't know right off hand, what versions of Windows it supports.
    > >> I'm using it on Win2K right now, and it is fine. Something else
    > >> is going on with your system, would be my guess. Are you seeing
    > >> any other strange problems, or is this the only one ?

    >
    > >>     Paul- Hide quoted text -

    >
    > >> - Show quoted text -

    >
    > > I have never experienced such peculiarities with other programs and
    > > only with that UVCvie...
    > > My PC is run by WinXP Sp2.
    > > I could never get it to display the appearance that you showed here
    > >http://www.die.de/blog/content/binary/usbview.png

    >
    > I've been looking for another copy, and there is one here.
    >
    > ftp://ftp.efo.ru/pub/ftdichip/Utilities/
    >
    > File size is 167,232 bytes.
    > MD5sum is 93244d84d79314898e62d21cecc4ca5e
    >
    > The MD5sum matches the download from the Microsoft site, so seems
    > to be legitimate. Give that one a try and see if the behavior is
    > any different.
    >
    > Maybe someone else understands the significance of -
    >
    >     "16 Bit MS-DOS Subsystem"
    >
    > because I don't. Presumably it is an important clue. I'd
    > almost suspect malware, or alternately, an important file
    > on your C: drive is corrupted. I tried looking on the
    > Microsoft site, and so far, don't see an exact match
    > for the symptoms.
    >
    >     Paul- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Thanks for that link Paul! The UVCview.x86 from that ftp really
    works ! It displays the activity of all the available USB ports and
    its conclusive, the suspect drive is really bugged or possibly fried
    by static electricity as its not shown in the diagram no matter how
    many times I refreshed it.
    Meanwhile a normal flash drive will indicate its connection status.

    Now the question is there a way to retrieve the data DIY or I just
    have to dispose it?.
    Roy
     
    Roy, Jun 29, 2008
    #15
  16. Roy

    Paul Guest

    Roy wrote:
    > On Jun 29, 1:05 pm, Paul <> wrote:
    >> Roy wrote:
    >>> On Jun 29, 5:23 am, Paul <> wrote:
    >>>> Roy wrote:
    >>>>> On Jun 28, 9:41 pm, Paul <> wrote:
    >>>>>> Roy wrote:
    >>>>>>> Hello Paul
    >>>>>>> I was able to downloaded the file and immediately run it but
    >>>>>>> regardless if the USBflash drive plugged is suspected to be defective
    >>>>>>> or intact , it does not react...Is there a special way to run this
    >>>>>>> software?
    >>>>>>> Thanks
    >>>>>>> Roy
    >>>>>> If there is no reaction, then the USB flash is dead. It could be that
    >>>>>> there is a break in where the connector meets the PCB, inside the flash
    >>>>>> packaging.
    >>>>>> You should also test, with a known to be working USB device. That
    >>>>>> will demonstrate how the program is supposed to work, and also prove
    >>>>>> there isn't a problem with the USB ports on the computer you are
    >>>>>> using for this testing.
    >>>>>> I also use a couple Linux LiveCD distributions, for hardware testing.
    >>>>>> Knoppix (knopper.net) and Ubuntu (ubuntu.com), can be booted from
    >>>>>> their respective CDs, without installing any software on the hard
    >>>>>> drive. Using programs like dmesg, lspci, and lsusb in Linux, you
    >>>>>> can list/enumerate the hardware that the OS can "see". But UVCView
    >>>>>> should be doing the same thing, with a much smaller investment
    >>>>>> in time and effort. Those Linux distributions, are a 700MB download.
    >>>>>> Any time I need to prove "it's a hardware problem", I boot one of
    >>>>>> the Linux CDs, and see if the symptoms look the same. For example,
    >>>>>> my first computer had a video (AGP) problem, and the symptoms
    >>>>>> existed in both Windows and Linux.
    >>>>>> Paul
    >>>>> I did try using a working USB device such as the flash drive,
    >>>>> wireless mouse dongle, it does not react... or does it need more time
    >>>>> for its operation? Whenever I click the close icon it states that "
    >>>>> windows cannot close the program, it may need more time for its
    >>>>> operation etc".
    >>>>> Further
    >>>>> the caption says:
    >>>>> 16 Bit MS-DOS Subsystem
    >>>>> D:\UVCVIE~1.EXE
    >>>>> C:\DOCUME~\ROYBAS~1\LOCALS~1Temp\. A temporary file needed for
    >>>>> initialization could not be created or could not be written to. Make
    >>>>> sure that the directory path exists, and disk space is available.
    >>>>> Click close to terminate the application
    >>>>> This surprises me is as I never experienced this with previous command
    >>>>> prompt application.
    >>>>> I don't understand why would it have an issue of disk space when I
    >>>>> still have 35 gigs of free space in my hard drive
    >>>>> BTW Sorry
    >>>>> I am not familiar with linux applicationeither..
    >>>>> Roy
    >>>> UVCView.x86.exe should execute immediately when you double click it in
    >>>> a folder window. File size is 167,231 bytes. It is not a DOS program.
    >>>> When it starts, it should look very similar to this.
    >>>> http://www.die.de/blog/content/binary/usbview.png
    >>>> I don't know right off hand, what versions of Windows it supports.
    >>>> I'm using it on Win2K right now, and it is fine. Something else
    >>>> is going on with your system, would be my guess. Are you seeing
    >>>> any other strange problems, or is this the only one ?
    >>>> Paul- Hide quoted text -
    >>>> - Show quoted text -
    >>> I have never experienced such peculiarities with other programs and
    >>> only with that UVCvie...
    >>> My PC is run by WinXP Sp2.
    >>> I could never get it to display the appearance that you showed here
    >>> http://www.die.de/blog/content/binary/usbview.png

    >> I've been looking for another copy, and there is one here.
    >>
    >> ftp://ftp.efo.ru/pub/ftdichip/Utilities/
    >>
    >> File size is 167,232 bytes.
    >> MD5sum is 93244d84d79314898e62d21cecc4ca5e
    >>
    >> The MD5sum matches the download from the Microsoft site, so seems
    >> to be legitimate. Give that one a try and see if the behavior is
    >> any different.
    >>
    >> Maybe someone else understands the significance of -
    >>
    >> "16 Bit MS-DOS Subsystem"
    >>
    >> because I don't. Presumably it is an important clue. I'd
    >> almost suspect malware, or alternately, an important file
    >> on your C: drive is corrupted. I tried looking on the
    >> Microsoft site, and so far, don't see an exact match
    >> for the symptoms.
    >>
    >> Paul- Hide quoted text -
    >>
    >> - Show quoted text -

    >
    > Thanks for that link Paul! The UVCview.x86 from that ftp really
    > works ! It displays the activity of all the available USB ports and
    > its conclusive, the suspect drive is really bugged or possibly fried
    > by static electricity as its not shown in the diagram no matter how
    > many times I refreshed it.
    > Meanwhile a normal flash drive will indicate its connection status.
    >
    > Now the question is there a way to retrieve the data DIY or I just
    > have to dispose it?.
    > Roy


    I understand there are outfits that will attempt recovery of data from
    USB flash sticks. I don't see a way to do it with software right now,
    unless you can coax the unit to appear in UVCView. If there is absolutely
    no response, then any kind of software probe will fail. (You might start
    with the manufacturer's web site, before searching for an independent
    recovery lab.)

    To recover the data in a hardware lab, I think there are at least two chips
    inside the flash stick. One is the controller, with USB interface. The other
    chip or chips, are the flash storage devices. By removing the flash storage
    chip and connecting it to another controller, a recovery lab may gain access to
    the data. (Or for that matter, they may even have a clip or jig, to probe
    the chip without removing it.)

    If the unit is easy to disassemble, you can look at where the USB connector
    solders to the PCB. If the design concentrates bending stresses all
    at one point, the result can be that a trace to the USB connector is
    broken. If that is the case, then some careful work with a soldering
    iron (not a Weller solder gun), might be able to fix it enough, to do
    data recovery. You would want a soldering iron with a grounded tip, and
    really old fashioned soldering irons, may deliver a small static discharge
    to what they are soldering. But the last small iron I bought from
    Radio Shack, was grounded.

    With regard to why the archive.org version of file failed, as I mentioned
    earlier, the files for download now, are a byte short. There should be
    a byte with 0x00 in it, on the end of the file. My copy of Win2K seems
    to tolerate the missing byte. I guess WinXP is being more careful. The
    FTP site I provided the link to, is not missing the byte, and is the
    full file. So perhaps that is why it worked. I've never had a complaint
    from other people, about the web.archive.org version of the file. I
    guess now I'll have to permanently switch to that new link.

    Paul
     
    Paul, Jun 29, 2008
    #16
  17. Roy

    Roy Guest

    On Jun 30, 12:16 am, Paul <> wrote:
    > Roy wrote:
    > > On Jun 29, 1:05 pm, Paul <> wrote:
    > >> Roy wrote:
    > >>> On Jun 29, 5:23 am, Paul <> wrote:
    > >>>> Roy wrote:
    > >>>>> On Jun 28, 9:41 pm, Paul <> wrote:
    > >>>>>> Roy wrote:
    > >>>>>>> Hello Paul
    > >>>>>>> I was able to downloaded the file and immediately run it but
    > >>>>>>> regardless if the USBflash drive plugged  is suspected to be defective
    > >>>>>>> or intact , it does not react...Is there a special way to run this
    > >>>>>>> software?
    > >>>>>>> Thanks
    > >>>>>>> Roy
    > >>>>>> If there is no reaction, then the USB flash is dead. It could be that
    > >>>>>> there is a break in where the connector meets the PCB, inside the flash
    > >>>>>> packaging.
    > >>>>>> You should also test, with a known to be working USB device. That
    > >>>>>> will demonstrate how the program is supposed to work, and also prove
    > >>>>>> there isn't a problem with the USB ports on the computer you are
    > >>>>>> using for this testing.
    > >>>>>> I also use a couple Linux LiveCD distributions, for hardware testing.
    > >>>>>> Knoppix (knopper.net) and Ubuntu (ubuntu.com), can be booted from
    > >>>>>> their respective CDs, without installing any software on the hard
    > >>>>>> drive. Using programs like dmesg, lspci, and lsusb in Linux, you
    > >>>>>> can list/enumerate the hardware that the OS can "see". But UVCView
    > >>>>>> should be doing the same thing, with a much smaller investment
    > >>>>>> in time and effort. Those Linux distributions, are a 700MB download.
    > >>>>>> Any time I need to prove "it's a hardware problem", I boot one of
    > >>>>>> the Linux CDs, and see if the symptoms look the same. For example,
    > >>>>>> my first computer had a video (AGP) problem, and the symptoms
    > >>>>>> existed in both Windows and Linux.
    > >>>>>>     Paul
    > >>>>> I did try using a working USB device such as the  flash drive,
    > >>>>> wireless mouse dongle, it does not react... or does it need more time
    > >>>>> for its operation? Whenever I click the close icon it states that "
    > >>>>> windows cannot close the program, it may need more time for its
    > >>>>> operation etc".
    > >>>>> Further
    > >>>>> the caption says:
    > >>>>> 16 Bit MS-DOS Subsystem
    > >>>>> D:\UVCVIE~1.EXE
    > >>>>> C:\DOCUME~\ROYBAS~1\LOCALS~1Temp\. A temporary file needed for
    > >>>>> initialization could not be created or could not be written to. Make
    > >>>>> sure that the directory path exists, and disk space is available.
    > >>>>> Click close to terminate the application
    > >>>>> This surprises me is as I never experienced this with previous command
    > >>>>> prompt application.
    > >>>>> I don't understand why would it have an issue of disk space when I
    > >>>>> still have 35 gigs of free space in my hard drive
    > >>>>> BTW Sorry
    > >>>>> I am not familiar with linux  applicationeither..
    > >>>>> Roy
    > >>>> UVCView.x86.exe should execute immediately when you double click it in
    > >>>> a folder window. File size is 167,231 bytes. It is not a DOS program..
    > >>>> When it starts, it should look very similar to this.
    > >>>>http://www.die.de/blog/content/binary/usbview.png
    > >>>> I don't know right off hand, what versions of Windows it supports.
    > >>>> I'm using it on Win2K right now, and it is fine. Something else
    > >>>> is going on with your system, would be my guess. Are you seeing
    > >>>> any other strange problems, or is this the only one ?
    > >>>>     Paul- Hide quoted text -
    > >>>> - Show quoted text -
    > >>> I have never experienced such peculiarities with other programs and
    > >>> only with that UVCvie...
    > >>> My PC is run by WinXP Sp2.
    > >>> I could never get it to display the appearance that you showed here
    > >>>http://www.die.de/blog/content/binary/usbview.png
    > >> I've been looking for another copy, and there is one here.

    >
    > >>ftp://ftp.efo.ru/pub/ftdichip/Utilities/

    >
    > >> File size is 167,232 bytes.
    > >> MD5sum is 93244d84d79314898e62d21cecc4ca5e

    >
    > >> The MD5sum matches the download from the Microsoft site, so seems
    > >> to be legitimate. Give that one a try and see if the behavior is
    > >> any different.

    >
    > >> Maybe someone else understands the significance of -

    >
    > >>     "16 Bit MS-DOS Subsystem"

    >
    > >> because I don't. Presumably it is an important clue. I'd
    > >> almost suspect malware, or alternately, an important file
    > >> on your C: drive is corrupted. I tried looking on the
    > >> Microsoft site, and so far, don't see an exact match
    > >> for the symptoms.

    >
    > >>     Paul- Hide quoted text -

    >
    > >> - Show quoted text -

    >
    > > Thanks for that link Paul! The UVCview.x86 from that ftp really
    > > works ! It displays the activity of  all the available USB ports and
    > > its conclusive, the suspect drive is really bugged or possibly fried
    > > by static electricity as its not shown in the diagram no matter how
    > > many times I refreshed it.
    > > Meanwhile a normal flash drive will indicate its connection status.

    >
    > > Now the question is there a way to retrieve the data DIY or I just
    > > have to dispose it?.
    > > Roy

    >
    > I understand there are outfits that will attempt recovery of data from
    > USB flash sticks. I don't see a way to do it with software right now,
    > unless you can coax the unit to appear in UVCView. If there is absolutely
    > no response, then any kind of software probe will fail. (You might start
    > with the manufacturer's web site, before searching for an independent
    > recovery lab.)
    >
    > To recover the data in a hardware lab, I think there are at least two chips
    > inside the flash stick. One is the controller, with USB interface. The other
    > chip or chips, are the flash storage devices. By removing the flash storage
    > chip and connecting it to another controller, a recovery lab may gain access to
    > the data. (Or for that matter, they may even have a clip or jig, to probe
    > the chip without removing it.)
    >
    > If the unit is easy to disassemble, you can look at where the USB connector
    > solders to the PCB. If the design concentrates bending stresses all
    > at one point, the result can be that a trace to the USB connector is
    > broken. If that is the case, then some careful work with a soldering
    > iron (not a Weller solder gun), might be able to fix it enough, to do
    > data recovery. You would want a soldering iron with a grounded tip, and
    > really old fashioned soldering irons, may deliver a small static discharge
    > to what they are soldering. But the last small iron I bought from
    > Radio Shack, was grounded.
    >
    > With regard to why the archive.org version of file failed, as I mentioned
    > earlier, the files for download now, are a byte short. There should be
    > a byte with 0x00 in it, on the end of the file. My copy of Win2K seems
    > to tolerate the missing byte. I guess WinXP is being more careful. The
    > FTP site I provided the link to, is not missing the byte, and is the
    > full file. So perhaps that is why it worked. I've never had a complaint
    > from other people, about the web.archive.org version of the file. I
    > guess now I'll have to permanently switch to that new link.
    >
    >     Paul- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    I understand....I think cost wise, data recovery from the flash drive
    is not encouraging if a third party will attempt to recover it.
    Regarding DIY with the information you mentioned I can't do it myself
    as that requires some sort of considerable skill in electronics and
    surgical precision and I am not good in doing that.
    I just have to extract the bits and pieces of that important file of
    that busted flash drive from the hard drive of the computer where it
    was copied and recompose it. That s a lot of work to be done but I am
    certain I can recover the lost data better this way...
    Anyway I learned something very important
    To be in careful of plugging any Flash drive on any computer as there
    are some units that have stray static electricity.
    I just verified it from somebody who also plugged a flash drive it was
    busted also by the same PC that destroyed mine.

    Thank you very much for all your help Paul!
    Sincerely
    ROY

    BTW,
    Just another thing. to think about..how come larger external HDD USB
    connected drives is not affected by that PC and how come only the
    flash drives .....?
    Just keep me wondering

    Roy
     
    Roy, Jun 30, 2008
    #17
  18. Roy

    Paul Guest

    Roy wrote:

    >
    > BTW,
    > Just another thing. to think about..how come larger external HDD USB
    > connected drives is not affected by that PC and how come only the
    > flash drives .....?
    > Just keep me wondering
    >
    > Roy


    If you want another lesson to learn from this experience, it would be
    that when visiting a friend, plug your USB flash stick, into a
    rear port on the computer. The rear ports should always be wired
    correctly, as they are soldered to the motherboard. I don't think
    I've ever read an account of a rear port being wired incorrectly.

    It could be, that your friend's computer has a wiring problem with
    the front USB port. Perhaps the D+ and D- pins are wired OK, but
    something is wrong with the +5V and GND signals. (There are four
    signals in all, on the USB interface, plus a ground for the metal
    shield.) What I do when I build a computer, is I verify the signal
    names on the wiring harness, by using a multimeter. I touch a pin
    on the front (using a pinout diagram from the Internet), and use the
    other lead on the meter, to touch the named wire inside the case.
    That is called "buzzing" out the wiring. I check the wiring, because
    I have a couple computer cases here, where the wires are not labeled
    correctly. So the fault may not actually be caused by your friend,
    but by the computer case manufacturer - and because of my experiences,
    I recommend verifying the wiring is correct, if someone is going to
    wire up their own front ports. It seems computer case makers aren't
    that concerned about wiring issues, and are better at bashing and
    cutting metal.

    Paul
     
    Paul, Jun 30, 2008
    #18
  19. Roy

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Somewhere on teh intarweb "Roy" typed:
    > Thanks for that link Paul! The UVCview.x86 from that ftp really
    > works !


    Thanks from me also Paul. I've grabbed that to put in my bag of tricks. :)
    --
    Shaun.

    DISCLAIMER: If you find a posting or message from me
    offensive, inappropriate, or disruptive, please ignore it.
    If you don't know how to ignore a posting, complain to
    me and I will be only too happy to demonstrate... ;-)
     
    ~misfit~, Jun 30, 2008
    #19
  20. Roy

    Roy Guest

    On Jun 30, 1:31 pm, Paul <> wrote:
    > Roy wrote:
    >
    > > BTW,
    > > Just another thing. to think about..how come larger external HDD USB
    > > connected drives is not affected by that PC and how come only the
    > > flash drives .....?
    > > Just keep me wondering

    >
    > > Roy

    >
    > If you want another lesson to learn from this experience, it would be
    > that when visiting a friend, plug your USB flash stick, into a
    > rear port on the computer. The rear ports should always be wired
    > correctly, as they are soldered to the motherboard. I don't think
    > I've ever read an account of a rear port being wired incorrectly.
    >
    > It could be, that your friend's computer has a wiring problem with
    > the front USB port. Perhaps the D+ and D- pins are wired OK, but
    > something is wrong with the +5V and GND signals. (There are four
    > signals in all, on the USB interface, plus a ground for the metal
    > shield.) What I do when I build a computer, is I verify the signal
    > names on the wiring harness, by using a multimeter. I touch a pin
    > on the front (using a pinout diagram from the Internet), and use the
    > other lead on the meter, to touch the named wire inside the case.
    > That is called "buzzing" out the wiring. I check the wiring, because
    > I have a couple computer cases here, where the wires are not labeled
    > correctly. So the fault may not actually be caused by your friend,
    > but by the computer case manufacturer - and because of my experiences,
    > I recommend verifying the wiring is correct, if someone is going to
    > wire up their own front ports. It seems computer case makers aren't
    > that concerned about wiring issues, and are better at bashing and
    > cutting metal.
    >
    >     Paul


    The front side USB slots are not working anymore and there was only
    one remaining free USB PORT and that is located in the rear side or
    rear port and it was that place where I plugged my flash drive that '
    fried ' it. the USB ports adjacent to it are connected to other
    peripheral devices which incidentally are working normally...
    I am also wondering if its the fault of the flash drive due to sloppy
    build?
    Incidentally Both of the damaged flash drives were made by transcend.

    Sorry
    I am not willing to risk another of my flash drives on that
    machine,,,,,
     
    Roy, Jun 30, 2008
    #20
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