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Windows 8: RIP, Aero (2003-2012)

 
 
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Zema Bus's Avatar
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      20th May 2012
This is basically a follow up to my post in April about the changes planned for the Windows 8 UI. Paul Thurrott does a great job of extracting and deciphering the information buried in the Microsoft blogs. Keep in mind that Paul Thurrott has been what most would consider to be a Windows fan boy, and has had his winsupersite up since the 90's as proof of that. And though he is frequently very critical of Microsoft's antics and practices, this has got to be the most down I have ever seen him of Windows. The second quoted block of text below really illustrates what's likely going on here. Personally I'm not concerned - I use Linux for most of what I do, Windows 7 which I use for games will be supported for a long time, and Steam is working on adding support for Linux anyway. I'm just fascinated by the Microsoft train-wreck


Quote:
Saturday, May 19, 2012
Windows 8 Release Preview: RIP, Aero (2003-2012)

Microsoft quietly revealed this week that it will kill off the Aero glass interface in Windows 8 and replace it with a flat, Metro-like Explorer that’s more in line with the company’s current design mantra. But this change isn’t just about obfuscation. It’s about the Windows team abandoning the very market that drove Windows’s success for over 25 years in order to chase a coming and potentially illusory market for tablet devices.

In the heady early days of Longhorn, circa 2003, the addition of “glass” to the windows in Windows was seen as both a major push forward and, lest we forget, a way to catch up with the UI translucency effects that Apple had previously added to Mac OS X. Since then, Microsoft shipped its first Aero-based Explorer in Windows Vista in 2006 and then deeply refined this UI in Windows 7 in 2009, adding the effect to the taskbar. But now Microsoft is killing Aero, apparently, removing the glass from Windows 8. And the real reason they’re doing this may surprise you.

As has been the case so often recently, this momentous news comes not via an obviously-titled Microsoft blog post like “Why We’re Killing Aero.” Instead, Microsoft buried this information deep within a mammoth 11,000 word blog post, Creating the Windows 8 user experience, that deals mostly with the history of Windows UIs (yes, seriously, dating back to 1985) and, for Windows 8, the new Metro-based user experiences. Why Microsoft can’t just get to the point is beyond me. But I guess that’s why people like me exist: To cut to the chase.

So let me spare you some pain. A full 10,000+ words into this book-length blog post, Jensen Harris—who, God help me, I just love the guy—finally admits that Microsoft, even this late in the development of Windows 8, is about to change the desktop user interface.

What?!

Here are the relevant parts in which Mr. Harris describes the coming changes:

“We want desktop windows to continue to feel light and airy, and we want a chrome style that doesn’t distract from the content of the app … Aero was designed to help the app’s content to be the center of attention, and for the Windows system UI to recede into the background. This is still relevant today, and while we are moving beyond Aero, we don’t want to lose sight of these goals.”

“We made a conscious effort to relate the visual appearance of the Windows 8 desktop to the visual appearance of the familiar Windows 7 desktop. This helps people who want to predominantly use the desktop feel comfortable and immediately at home in the new environment.”

“We applied the principles of ‘clean and crisp’ when updating window and taskbar chrome. Gone are the glass and reflections. We squared off the edges of windows and the taskbar. We removed all the glows and gradients found on buttons within the chrome. We made the appearance of windows crisper by removing unnecessary shadows and transparency. The default window chrome is white, creating an airy and premium look. The taskbar continues to blend into the desktop wallpaper, but appears less complicated overall. To complete the story, we updated the appearance of most common controls, such as buttons, check boxes, sliders, and the Ribbon. We squared off the rounded edges, cleaned away gradients, and flattened the control backgrounds to align with our chrome changes. We also tweaked the colors to make them feel more modern and neutral.”
Quote:
I’m curious why Microsoft never explained the need to remove Aero. But let me offer up a reason, one that the company had mentioned previously with regards to the downtuned Aero version that’s appeared in Windows 8 builds so far and is mentioned in this mammoth post, too, but not with regards to the desktop:

It’s all about battery life.

Aero, with all its glassy, translucent goodness, is bad for battery life. Metro, meanwhile, which is flat, dull, not transparent, and only full screen, is very good for battery life. It’s predictable. There’s no worry that people will run overlapping anything, eating away at power cycles, because you can’t run overlapping anything with Metro: Everything is full screen and app lifecycles are automatically maintained by the system. God, the desktop was so pesky. How didn’t we see this before?

Whatever.

Rest in peace, Aero. I liked you, a lot. Still do. And I’ll miss you. I’m curious why Windows 8 can’t simply include Aero themes in addition to something flatter and duller, especially for those desktop PC-using power users who will primarily use the desktop environment and not care about (let alone need) better battery life. But I’m starting to see more clearly what’s happening here and starting to accept that Windows is growing into something that isn’t so much for me anymore as it is for some mythical tablet user base that may or may not appear in the future.

That brings me back to my central complaint about Windows 8 generally and Metro specifically: This is a neat thing that Microsoft’s building, it really is. But it should have occurred in something outside of Windows. (It should have been just Windows RT, minus the desktop.) Windows 8 isn’t even Windows anymore. It’s a tablet OS that’s been grafted onto Windows like a monstrous Frankenstein experiment.

And, no, I’m not being petty here. In any technological migration, there are winners and losers and, sometimes, a majority of users who are unknowingly financing the move to something different. In the 1980’s, for example, the Apple II business kept Apple alive while it foisted money-losing Macs into the market until desktop publishing arrived to save the platform and, ultimately, push the Mac well beyond the Apple II.

The migration to Windows 8 is just like that. Today, Microsoft boasts of up to 1.3 billion active Windows users. Windows 8 is not for them, not for the most part: We get a few bones, like Storage Spaces and quicker boot times, but the desktop environment is pretty much just Windows 7++ (or Windows 7+1 for you non-programmers). But it is those very users who don’t want or need tablet functionality that are financing Microsoft’s push towards an OS—that is not really Windows—that will replace what they’re using. Maybe not in Windows 8. Maybe in Windows 9, or 10. But eventually.

Do I feel weird about this? Sure. I’m a dinosaur driving a desktop PC that Microsoft doesn’t really care about anymore. Heck, I just bought a new desktop computer. It’s like I didn’t get the memo.

Message received.
Read the whole article which includes some screen shots at Winsupersite.com
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Windows 8: RIP, Aero (2003-2012)-win8logo.jpeg  

 

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ZemaTalon
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      20th May 2012
Quote:
I'm just fascinated by the Microsoft train-wreck.
me too ... wonder how long we can hold on to Win7, before Win9 surfaces.

 

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      20th May 2012
If Steam make games work in Linux I think that may very well be the turning point for me.

The greater majority of Games now work in Steam, rivals like EA/Origin I could live without anyway.

Apart from games, the only software I need in Windows is MS Publisher, to open all my saved Publisher files. And as I have all the pictures needed to create those files saved I could actually re-create them in Scribus, an open source program similar to Publisher that works in Linux.

Optimistically yours - a Windows user who praised Win 7 only to watch Microsoft seemingly shoot themselves in the foot with it's successor.

 
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      20th May 2012
Quote:
Originally Posted by floppybootstomp View Post

Apart from games, the only software I need in Windows is MS Publisher, to open all my saved Publisher files. And as I have all the pictures needed to create those files saved I could actually re-create them in Scribus, an open source program similar to Publisher that works in Linux.

.
http://blog.documentfoundation.org/2...eoffice-3-5-3/

Quote:
How do I use the Publisher Import filter? It doesn’t seem to be listed as a file type when I go to open the file, and LibreOffice 3.5.3 doesn’t seem to just recognize it when I select “All files” as the file type (it presents me with a window asking for a “filter selection”, and again Microsoft Publisher or anything similar is not in that list).
Comment by Mike Freeman — May 2, 2012 @ 18:49
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Too early. The MS Publisher import filter will be developed in the next few months, and might be available with LibreOffice 4.0 in early 2013.
Comment by italovignoli — May 2, 2012 @ 18:51
or

http://www.ehow.com/how_5904358_open...penoffice.html

Quote:
Open Office provides free programs that are similar to Microsoft Office programs, and most of the Microsoft Office files can be opened by Open Office programs. However, a .pub document cannot be opened by Open Office directly. The .pub file format is compatible with Microsoft Publisher. There is not an equivalent program for Microsoft Office Publisher in Open Office, and the .pub file must be converted to another format before it can be opened in Open Office. Saving the .pub file as a .doc file is an easy way to open the contents of the .pub document with Open Office Writer.
I'm guessing you might be able to do that with Libre Office as well.


 

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sugar 'n spikes
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      21st May 2012
No go with Publisher files I'm afraid I gave a Publisher file a 'doc' file extension and Libre Office turned it's nose up at it. I don't currently have Open Office installed anywhere so haven't tried that.

Still, good to know they're working on it.

Publisher is one of the few good things Microsoft have got right, it's better than Scribus but it is still Microsoft of course. I've been using Publisher since '97.

It wouldn't neccessarily be a drawback to choosing a Linux Distro as main OS though, I have three paid for versions of Windows here - XP, Vista & 7. I also have a machine that will take a variety of hard disks in a caddy (I currently have four disks to swap in and out) so I will probably always have one version of Windows running should I need it, and for Publisher I would need it.

Nope, it's just games. 'Wine' is useless, flawed software and kinda pointless. If Steam get it together to make Windows games work in Linux, not only will they have my undying admiration but they will also make themselves considerably richer.

 
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      21st May 2012
I'm really puzzled by Windows 8 - as there are some really good new features, but I really dislike the new interface. I always assumed that they just forced the metro interface for the preview editions, but that there would be a way to go back to Aero on a desktop machine.

It's not long until the RC is out, so I guess we'll find out a bit more then. Fingers crossed there have been some GUI improvements.
 
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      21st May 2012
http://user.services.openoffice.org/...ic.php?t=13121

Quote:
On Windows at least, you can also open the .doc file in WordPad and then copy all of the text and images and paste them into a new OOo document. It is sometimes quicker to do this and reformat your new OOo document than try to re-work the imported .doc.
http://www.neowin.net/forum/topic/98...les-in-ubuntu/

Quote:
Posted 02 April 2011 - 22:44
You could try LibreOffice Draw it's worked on the occasions I've needed to open pub files.
Top tip should work in Libre. If thems do not work you'll just have to wait or use crayons and paper.

 

"There's a saying in Estonia that in order to see new things, you have to follow common paths - paths you know."
Games people play, you take it or you leave it
Things that they say, honor brite
If I promise you the moon and the stars, would you believe it
Games people play in the middle of the night
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      25th May 2012
Here's Paul Thurrott and Leo Laporte discussing the "dumbening" (of Windows 8) in this podcast:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=32ZdghDGCuI

 

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