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What's the difference between a .pot and and a .ppt file?

 
 
=?Utf-8?B?RGF2ZSBKZW5raW5z?=
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      13th Aug 2007
Can somebody explain the essential differences between the two file types?
(Or maybe point me to a good explanation?)

Also, in PPT 2007, what is the source of the displayed themes that appear on
the ribbon? Do they come from the templates that PowerPoint knows about? I
can see how I can access a custom theme from a themed document, but how do I
get the ribbon to include that theme for all my PowerPoint editing? Very
puzzling ...

--
Dave Jenkins
K5KX
 
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Ute Simon
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      13th Aug 2007
> Can somebody explain the essential differences between the two file types?
> (Or maybe point me to a good explanation?)
>
> Also, in PPT 2007, what is the source of the displayed themes that appear
> on
> the ribbon? Do they come from the templates that PowerPoint knows about?
> I
> can see how I can access a custom theme from a themed document, but how do
> I
> get the ribbon to include that theme for all my PowerPoint editing? Very
> puzzling ...


Hi Dave,

a POT (or POTX in PowerPoint 2007) is a template. It on the one hand defines
background, fonts, margins, colors, etc. of a presentation and on the other
hand can hold sample slides. If you double-click on a template in Windows
explorer, not the file itself is opened, but a new presentation based on
this template. Templates should be stored in a standard template folder, so
that they can be found with File - New. A PPT (or PPTX in 2007) file is a
"normal" presentation, that has slides with content and is normally based on
a template. If you like the background etc. of a file, but don't have the
template, you can convert any presentation into a template by File - Save as
and choose POT (or POTX) as the file format and them delete the slides you
don't need. Up to PowerPoint 2003 you can also rename a PPT to POT to get a
template file, this doesn't work any more in PPT 2007.

In PPT 2007, while templates (POTX) only work for PowerPoint, a theme can
hold information about colors, fonts, and effects, which can be used in Word
and Excel, too. To create a Theme, adjust the settings for background, theme
colors, theme fonts, and theme effects and then Save As a THMX file into the
templates folder. You can change the location of the templates folder in
Word, but it should normally be automatically displayed if you choose to
save as a template or theme.

Best regards,
Ute

--
Ute Simon
Microsoft PowerPoint MVP Team und PowerPoint-User-Team
Das PowerPoint-Event des Jahres: Die PowerPoint-Anwendertage,
14. - 16.10.2007 in Fulda, http://powerpoint.anwendertage.de


 
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=?Utf-8?B?RGF2ZSBKZW5raW5z?=
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      13th Aug 2007
Hi Ute:

Thanks for the explanation - it's very helpful.

We tend to send out .ppt's and say, "Here - use this as a template" which
somewhat flies in the face of the more rigorous use of the term as it applies
to .pot's.

What I'm wrestling with is what's the best way to ensure that the folks we
are dealing with all send us back .ppt (or pptx) files that look the same,
have used the same themes, etc. Do we send them a .ppt and say, "Here -
modify that with your own data"? Or do we say, "Here's a .pot file - save it
someplace and then double-click it in Explorer to start a new .ppt file based
on it."? Is there any benefit to one of these approaches over the other?

Dave Jenkins
K5KX


"Ute Simon" wrote:

> > Can somebody explain the essential differences between the two file types?
> > (Or maybe point me to a good explanation?)
> >
> > Also, in PPT 2007, what is the source of the displayed themes that appear
> > on
> > the ribbon? Do they come from the templates that PowerPoint knows about?
> > I
> > can see how I can access a custom theme from a themed document, but how do
> > I
> > get the ribbon to include that theme for all my PowerPoint editing? Very
> > puzzling ...

>
> Hi Dave,
>
> a POT (or POTX in PowerPoint 2007) is a template. It on the one hand defines
> background, fonts, margins, colors, etc. of a presentation and on the other
> hand can hold sample slides. If you double-click on a template in Windows
> explorer, not the file itself is opened, but a new presentation based on
> this template. Templates should be stored in a standard template folder, so
> that they can be found with File - New. A PPT (or PPTX in 2007) file is a
> "normal" presentation, that has slides with content and is normally based on
> a template. If you like the background etc. of a file, but don't have the
> template, you can convert any presentation into a template by File - Save as
> and choose POT (or POTX) as the file format and them delete the slides you
> don't need. Up to PowerPoint 2003 you can also rename a PPT to POT to get a
> template file, this doesn't work any more in PPT 2007.
>
> In PPT 2007, while templates (POTX) only work for PowerPoint, a theme can
> hold information about colors, fonts, and effects, which can be used in Word
> and Excel, too. To create a Theme, adjust the settings for background, theme
> colors, theme fonts, and theme effects and then Save As a THMX file into the
> templates folder. You can change the location of the templates folder in
> Word, but it should normally be automatically displayed if you choose to
> save as a template or theme.
>
> Best regards,
> Ute
>
> --
> Ute Simon
> Microsoft PowerPoint MVP Team und PowerPoint-User-Team
> Das PowerPoint-Event des Jahres: Die PowerPoint-Anwendertage,
> 14. - 16.10.2007 in Fulda, http://powerpoint.anwendertage.de
>
>
>

 
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Ute Simon
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      14th Aug 2007
> Thanks for the explanation - it's very helpful.
>
> We tend to send out .ppt's and say, "Here - use this as a template" which
> somewhat flies in the face of the more rigorous use of the term as it
> applies
> to .pot's.
>
> What I'm wrestling with is what's the best way to ensure that the folks we
> are dealing with all send us back .ppt (or pptx) files that look the same,
> have used the same themes, etc. Do we send them a .ppt and say, "Here -
> modify that with your own data"? Or do we say, "Here's a .pot file - save
> it
> someplace and then double-click it in Explorer to start a new .ppt file
> based
> on it."? Is there any benefit to one of these approaches over the other?



Hi Dave,

it depends on the frequency of use: If you hold a conference and have
developed a template for this event, each of the speakers will need the
template only once. For many of them it might be easier then, if you send
them a PPT (or PPTX) file and ask them to use that for their slides for the
event. As they will not need it again, it does not make sense to store it as
a template.

If you are working in a corporate environment and want your employees to use
the same slide design in every meeting in the coming months, you need to use
a "real" template (POT or POTX). Make them store it in their template
folders or provide it on a standard template folder on your corporate
network, depending on your IT infrastructure.

And it depends on their IT knowledge: Even many IT specialists will not know
how to use the new themes (THMX) in Office 2007. So if they are not your
employees, don't bother them with your Theme. If you want to use it to
standardize Corporate Identity, educate them how to use it.

Best regards,
Ute

--
Ute Simon
Microsoft PowerPoint MVP Team und PowerPoint-User-Team
Das PowerPoint-Event des Jahres: Die PowerPoint-Anwendertage,
14. - 16.10.2007 in Fulda, http://powerpoint.anwendertage.de


 
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Steve Rindsberg
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      16th Aug 2007

> What I'm wrestling with is what's the best way to ensure that the folks we
> are dealing with all send us back .ppt (or pptx) files that look the same,
> have used the same themes, etc. Do we send them a .ppt and say, "Here -
> modify that with your own data"? Or do we say, "Here's a .pot file - save it
> someplace and then double-click it in Explorer to start a new .ppt file based
> on it."? Is there any benefit to one of these approaches over the other?


I'm away from the office right now but give me a shout in ten days or so, Dave.
You've got the email address. I'd like to show you something you might find very
useful.

-----------------------------------------
Steve Rindsberg, PPT MVP
PPT FAQ: www.pptfaq.com
PPTools: www.pptools.com
================================================


 
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