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Paul
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      12th Jul 2009
Jim Ludwig wrote:
> Paul,
> You are on the right track with this I think. I did indeed have the
> printer plugged into my PCI USB 2.0 card before I installed the
> software. So I uninstalled the software and started from scratch.
> There comes a point in the software installation when it prompts me to
> plug the printer into the usb slot. When I do, the found new hardware
> wizard starts saying it detected usb composite device. Again though, it
> creates a restore point and while the graphic of the files being
> transferred is on the screen, the computer reboots itself and my
> installation fails. So then I discovered that I can install the
> software and bypass plugging in the printer until later. So I did this
> and removed the driver disc from the drive. However, every time I try
> plugging the printer into the port, I get the same rebooting result. It
> evidently finds the necessary driver on the hard drive somewhere (that's
> why I took the cd out because I didn't know where it was tying to find
> the driver), but it can't install it. Also, as long as I keep the
> printer plugged in, I get the wizard everytime the computer boots. Any
> ideas as to what is causing the computer to reboot?
> Thanks,
> Jim


The reboot can be because of a crash. Do you see a blue screen with
an error message flash by ? It is possible to prevent immediate
rebooting, by a setting in a control panel.

Control Panels:System:Advanced:Startup and Recovery:untick Automatically restart

If you're getting a BSOD, now you should be able to see the error
number.

If, on the other hand, the crash and reboot is more uncontrolled, you
may get different symptoms.

I don't know too many tricks for dealing with these giant
printer software packages. On the one hand, you can try to
clean out the USB stack (and then let Windows rediscover the
hardware again). That may help if something is lodged in the
registry, which is upsetting things.

http://www.usbman.com/Guides/Cleanup...afe%20Mode.htm

" Windows Safe Mode

The order of removal must be followed exactly

* Delete USB peripheral devices (Scanners, Printers, Cameras etc.)
* Delete HID and/or Composite USB (Human Interface Devices)
* Delete USB Root Hub(s) (Universal Host Controllers)
* Delete USB Host Controller(s) (Universal Host Controllers) "

There is a setupapi.log file on the computer, and sometimes the
tail end of that file has interesting stuff in it. For the moment,
I'd try to capture a BSOD, if that is what is happening. Maybe
it'll hint at the problem.

Actually, I do have another suggestion for you. In your initial
posting, you indicate that the built-in USB is in sad shape,
while the USB PCI card works fine. If you aren't using a USB
keyboard, I might be tempted to move all USB devices
to the USB PCI card, and then go into the BIOS and disable
the built-in USB. Maybe this reboot problem is related to
Windows having a look at your "sad" USB hardware and
encountering a problem there.

I don't think a USB keyboard will work with a USB PCI card,
to give you access to the BIOS. For that, you should try a
PS/2 keyboard instead. The PCI card is good once you're out
of the BIOS, but while in the BIOS, there are limits as to
what hardware is supported. If you want a keyboard to work
in the BIOS, it should be PS/2 type, or if it is USB, it
should be plugged into the built-in USB ports (USB ports on
the motherboard chipset, are the ones that get supported).

There is only one chipset, which seems to be subject to a
significant number of failures on USB. The Intel chipset
with an ICH5 or ICH5R Southbridge, tends to get bad USB ports.
I've probably seen at least twenty posts now, involving stuff
like that. The really unlucky people, end up with a burned
chip like this one. The funny thing is, I have a motherboard
with one of these on it. I like to pretend it is a
ticking time bomb :-) The chip has no heatsink, so it is
easy to check for the burn mark.

http://onfinite.com/libraries/179057/2ea.jpg

Paul
 
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Jim Ludwig
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      15th Jul 2009
Paul,
Two things...
First, I learned so much just from your reply to my post. You are obviously
pretty knowledgable about this stuff. Thank you for the informative reply.
Second, your suggestion indeed worked. I deleted the entire usb stack from
device manager and let everything reload itself on a reboot and that fixed
all my problems. As I mention in my OP that I have installed a PCI USB 2.0
card. I used the driver from the cd that came with the card. Recently, I
upgraded to Win XP Service Pack 3. After I wiped the stack clean, I just
let XP load all of its native drivers and everything seems to be working
fine. Thank you very much for your assistance.
Jim


"Paul" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:h3deec$4n2$(E-Mail Removed)-september.org...
> Jim Ludwig wrote:
>> Paul,
>> You are on the right track with this I think. I did indeed have the
>> printer plugged into my PCI USB 2.0 card before I installed the software.
>> So I uninstalled the software and started from scratch. There comes a
>> point in the software installation when it prompts me to plug the printer
>> into the usb slot. When I do, the found new hardware wizard starts
>> saying it detected usb composite device. Again though, it creates a
>> restore point and while the graphic of the files being transferred is on
>> the screen, the computer reboots itself and my installation fails. So
>> then I discovered that I can install the software and bypass plugging in
>> the printer until later. So I did this and removed the driver disc from
>> the drive. However, every time I try plugging the printer into the port,
>> I get the same rebooting result. It evidently finds the necessary driver
>> on the hard drive somewhere (that's why I took the cd out because I
>> didn't know where it was tying to find the driver), but it can't install
>> it. Also, as long as I keep the printer plugged in, I get the wizard
>> everytime the computer boots. Any ideas as to what is causing the
>> computer to reboot?
>> Thanks,
>> Jim

>
> The reboot can be because of a crash. Do you see a blue screen with
> an error message flash by ? It is possible to prevent immediate
> rebooting, by a setting in a control panel.
>
> Control Panels:System:Advanced:Startup and Recovery:untick
> Automatically restart
>
> If you're getting a BSOD, now you should be able to see the error
> number.
>
> If, on the other hand, the crash and reboot is more uncontrolled, you
> may get different symptoms.
>
> I don't know too many tricks for dealing with these giant
> printer software packages. On the one hand, you can try to
> clean out the USB stack (and then let Windows rediscover the
> hardware again). That may help if something is lodged in the
> registry, which is upsetting things.
>
> http://www.usbman.com/Guides/Cleanup...afe%20Mode.htm
>
> " Windows Safe Mode
>
> The order of removal must be followed exactly
>
> * Delete USB peripheral devices (Scanners, Printers, Cameras etc.)
> * Delete HID and/or Composite USB (Human Interface Devices)
> * Delete USB Root Hub(s) (Universal Host Controllers)
> * Delete USB Host Controller(s) (Universal Host Controllers) "
>
> There is a setupapi.log file on the computer, and sometimes the
> tail end of that file has interesting stuff in it. For the moment,
> I'd try to capture a BSOD, if that is what is happening. Maybe
> it'll hint at the problem.
>
> Actually, I do have another suggestion for you. In your initial
> posting, you indicate that the built-in USB is in sad shape,
> while the USB PCI card works fine. If you aren't using a USB
> keyboard, I might be tempted to move all USB devices
> to the USB PCI card, and then go into the BIOS and disable
> the built-in USB. Maybe this reboot problem is related to
> Windows having a look at your "sad" USB hardware and
> encountering a problem there.
>
> I don't think a USB keyboard will work with a USB PCI card,
> to give you access to the BIOS. For that, you should try a
> PS/2 keyboard instead. The PCI card is good once you're out
> of the BIOS, but while in the BIOS, there are limits as to
> what hardware is supported. If you want a keyboard to work
> in the BIOS, it should be PS/2 type, or if it is USB, it
> should be plugged into the built-in USB ports (USB ports on
> the motherboard chipset, are the ones that get supported).
>
> There is only one chipset, which seems to be subject to a
> significant number of failures on USB. The Intel chipset
> with an ICH5 or ICH5R Southbridge, tends to get bad USB ports.
> I've probably seen at least twenty posts now, involving stuff
> like that. The really unlucky people, end up with a burned
> chip like this one. The funny thing is, I have a motherboard
> with one of these on it. I like to pretend it is a
> ticking time bomb :-) The chip has no heatsink, so it is
> easy to check for the burn mark.
>
> http://onfinite.com/libraries/179057/2ea.jpg
>
> Paul
>


 
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Paul
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Posts: n/a
 
      16th Jul 2009
Jim Ludwig wrote:
> Paul,
> Two things...
> First, I learned so much just from your reply to my post. You are
> obviously pretty knowledgable about this stuff. Thank you for the
> informative reply.
> Second, your suggestion indeed worked. I deleted the entire usb stack
> from device manager and let everything reload itself on a reboot and
> that fixed all my problems. As I mention in my OP that I have installed
> a PCI USB 2.0 card. I used the driver from the cd that came with the
> card. Recently, I upgraded to Win XP Service Pack 3. After I wiped the
> stack clean, I just let XP load all of its native drivers and everything
> seems to be working fine. Thank you very much for your assistance.
> Jim
>


Not that knowledgeable :-) Glad it worked out for you.

Paul
 
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