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Re: New CPU causes BSOD. HELP!

 
 
Paul
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Posts: n/a
 
      13th Dec 2011
Colin B. wrote:
> Hey everyone;
>
> I'm running XP SP3 on an older system. I had an E2200 CPU in an MSI
> motherboard (P35 Neo2). Last night I dropped a new CPU in--an E8500.
> Now the system will pass POST fine and the BIOS recognises the new CPU,
> but Windows won't boot. It gets to the logo screen, then flashes a BSOD
> and reboots.
>
> I've gone into the advanced startup options and said "don't reboot on
> failure" (or whatever the wording is), which allowed me to capture the
> Stop code: 0x8e.
>
> I ran Windows Memory test overnight and after 145 passes, it found no
> errors so I think I'm safe there.
>
> Also, I can't boot into safe mode. It does the same thing.
>
> Ideas? Is it actually a bad CPU or Windows just being annoying?
>
> Thanks,
> Colin
>


Did you make sure the BIOS was updated to the suggested minimum version first ?

http://www.msi.com/product/mb/P35-Ne...div=CPUSupport

http://www.msi.com/product/mb/P35-Neo2.html#/?div=BIOS

Other than that, you're going from FSB800 to FSB1333, and if you were
previously overclocking, you might have a RAM divider set improperly
or something.

It could be a bad CPU. That's certainly possible.

You could go into the BIOS, record any custom settings necessary to
get the computer to boot. Then, shut down and "clear CMOS" and
enter the BIOS settings again. Choices such as "Auto" in the BIOS,
should select stock frequencies for things. The only thing you have
to watch, is that you get the boot order set up properly again,
and the disk interface in the right mode (IDE, AHCI, RAID etc).

Instead of testing with Windows, when you make major hardware
changes, you can instead test with a Linux LiveCD, as that
doesn't reference the hard drives at all. You can go to mersenne.org/freesoft
and get a copy of Prime95, and use that as a load test. There is a
Linux version, as well as a Windows version. So you can do some
basic stability testing, from Linux. But only do that, after
you've done some checking about BIOS version, cleared CMOS
(with all power removed from the system). Then, it should be
safe to set things up again, and do some testing from say
a Ubuntu LiveCD. If a LiveCD crashes, no one gets hurt. You
can leave the hard drives disconnected for safety while
doing that. That way, there is less likely to be some kind
of corruption on the hard drive.

The BIOS should be flashed, while your old stable processor
is inserted. Once the new BIOS is in place, you can install
the new processor. If your setup is at all unstable, it
generally isn't a good idea to flash the BIOS in that state.
Even with a dual BIOS motherboard, there is some danger involved.

Your "8e" error is "KERNEL_MODE_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED". When
you get a BSOD, it's a good idea to write down the driver
name or the like, if it is printed on the screen. The kernel
can be tipped over by a driver.

http://aumha.org/a/stop.htm

I wouldn't have thought your processor was so radically different,
that Windows is getting tripped up. Your E2200 is a dual core,
and so is the E8500, and they're both Core2 processors.
What's not to like ? I would think the same HAL driver would
work. Activation might be affected, if enough hardware changes
have accumulated, but you'd have already heard about that
from the computer, if that was the case. And activation
shouldn't be crashing the kernel. Something else is doing that.

http://ark.intel.com/products/33925/...Hz-800-MHz-FSB)

http://aumha.org/win5/a/wpa.htm

I'm assuming here, that your E8500 is brand new. If you got the
E8500 off Ebay, it could have been tortured by it's previous
owner, made to drink liquid nitrogen and the like. If it's brand
new, then you know it hasn't been abused. Batches of bad processors
do escape the fab, but not that often. In terms of the quality of
testing, they generally give the processors a good test before
shipping them. Cheaper parts ($0.25 ICs) don't get nearly as much
testing.

Paul
 
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Paul
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      14th Dec 2011
Colin B. wrote:

>
> So this is my plan for the next round of "homework" (Bah, I'm too old to
> be troubleshooting junk like this!):
>
> 1) Reset the CMOS and retry
> 2) Boot from a Linux LiveCD and test the CPU. I'm thinking of using
> stresslinux - any thoughts?
> 3) Try to do a fresh XP install to a spare HDD I have.
> 4) ???
>
> Oh, just in passing I should also mention temperature: At first it was
> floating aroung 51C in the BIOS, but I decided to reseat the cooling
> fan (used the original fan from the E2200--both CPUs are 65W, so it
> should be sufficient), and now the BIOS is reporting about 41-43C; even
> immediately after Windows crashes. If I can get the livecd to run, then
> I should be able to monitor this closer.
>
> Thanks,
> Colin
>


Any kind of stress test will do.

The nice thing about Prime95, is that the program computes maths
with a known answer, allowing it to check that any computations
done are correct. It was originally intended, to help users contributing
to the Mersenne prime number project, to be able to weed out bad hardware.
The Mersenne prime project will fork out the same work, to more than one
machine, to seek confirmation, so even if machines aren't error free, they
can look at the response of multiple machines for better quality results.

If you only have one computer, you have the option of returning to running
the E2200, until you have all your tools in hand, and are ready to start
testing. I recommend two computers minimum, for home builders/hackers. I've
actually managed to break two machines while working on them, and needed a
third to make CDs, download stuff, and allow me to web surf for an answer, so
that's my current record for busting things :-) But normally, if something
breaks here, a second machine is enough.

You can always go to a computer recycler, and find some old Pentium III
box, which would be good enough for emergency downloads. Throw in a
$20 DVD burner, and your "liferaft" computer is ready. It might not be
fast enough for anything else, but for bailing out your main machine,
it would be enough.

Paul
 
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philo
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Posts: n/a
 
      23rd Dec 2011
On 12/14/2011 01:01 AM, Colin B. wrote:
> Paul<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> Colin B. wrote:
>>
>>>
>>> So this is my plan for the next round of "homework" (Bah, I'm too old to
>>> be troubleshooting junk like this!):
>>>
>>> 1) Reset the CMOS and retry
>>> 2) Boot from a Linux LiveCD and test the CPU. I'm thinking of using
>>> stresslinux - any thoughts?
>>> 3) Try to do a fresh XP install to a spare HDD I have.
>>> 4) ???
>>>
>>> Oh, just in passing I should also mention temperature: At first it was
>>> floating aroung 51C in the BIOS, but I decided to reseat the cooling
>>> fan (used the original fan from the E2200--both CPUs are 65W, so it
>>> should be sufficient), and now the BIOS is reporting about 41-43C; even
>>> immediately after Windows crashes. If I can get the livecd to run, then
>>> I should be able to monitor this closer.
>>>
>>> Thanks,
>>> Colin
>>>

>>
>> Any kind of stress test will do.
>>
>> The nice thing about Prime95, is that the program computes maths
>> with a known answer, allowing it to check that any computations
>> done are correct. It was originally intended, to help users contributing
>> to the Mersenne prime number project, to be able to weed out bad hardware.
>> The Mersenne prime project will fork out the same work, to more than one
>> machine, to seek confirmation, so even if machines aren't error free, they
>> can look at the response of multiple machines for better quality results.
>>
>> If you only have one computer, you have the option of returning to running
>> the E2200, until you have all your tools in hand, and are ready to start
>> testing. I recommend two computers minimum, for home builders/hackers. I've
>> actually managed to break two machines while working on them, and needed a
>> third to make CDs, download stuff, and allow me to web surf for an answer, so
>> that's my current record for busting things :-) But normally, if something
>> breaks here, a second machine is enough.
>>
>> You can always go to a computer recycler, and find some old Pentium III
>> box, which would be good enough for emergency downloads. Throw in a
>> $20 DVD burner, and your "liferaft" computer is ready. It might not be
>> fast enough for anything else, but for bailing out your main machine,
>> it would be enough.

>
> So I hereby declare the CPU to be bad.
>



<snip>

It's essentially impossible for a CPU to be bad if the machine boots.

Try clocking it down to see if you can get the machine to boot
 
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BillW50
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Posts: n/a
 
      24th Dec 2011
On 12/23/2011 4:38 PM, philo wrote:
> It's essentially impossible for a CPU to be bad if the machine boots.


I don't know about that! I've seen some bad CPUs that would boot some OS.

--
Bill
Gateway M465e ('06 era) - Thunderbird v3.0
Centrino Core2 Duo 2GHz - 1.5GB - Windows 7
 
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philo
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      24th Dec 2011
On 12/23/2011 05:05 PM, BillW50 wrote:
> On 12/23/2011 4:38 PM, philo wrote:
>> It's essentially impossible for a CPU to be bad if the machine boots.

>
> I don't know about that! I've seen some bad CPUs that would boot some OS.
>




Anything is possible
but in the ten+ years I've been doing repairs
I've only seen one dead cpu...and it was a dead-duck 100% failure.

It was one I had inadvertently over-voltaged
(back in the days of settable jumpers)
 
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Peter Foldes
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Posts: n/a
 
      24th Dec 2011
Paul

For your info only the "8e" error "KERNEL_MODE_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED" can also be
another issue altogether depending on the OP's XP system. See the link below.

Knowledge Base

The HaxDoor virus may cause a "STOP 0x00000050" or "STOP 0x0000008e" error message
PSS ID Number: 903251

Article Last Modified on 6/30/2005


ms-help://MS.MSDNQTR.2005OCT.1033/enu_kbwinnetsvrkb/winnetsvrkb/903251.htm

Affecting the following XP systems

a.. Microsoft Windows XP Tablet PC Edition
a.. Microsoft Windows XP Professional
a.. Microsoft Windows XP Media Center Edition
a.. Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition
a.. Microsoft Windows XP 64-Bit Edition

The above does not affect Vista or Win 7 systems


--
Peter
Please Reply to Newsgroup for the benefit of others
Requests for assistance by email can not and will not be acknowledged.
This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.
http://www.microsoft.com/protect


"Paul" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message news:jc807m$ne2$(E-Mail Removed)...
> Colin B. wrote:
>> Hey everyone;
>>
>> I'm running XP SP3 on an older system. I had an E2200 CPU in an MSI
>> motherboard (P35 Neo2). Last night I dropped a new CPU in--an E8500.
>> Now the system will pass POST fine and the BIOS recognises the new CPU,
>> but Windows won't boot. It gets to the logo screen, then flashes a BSOD
>> and reboots.
>>
>> I've gone into the advanced startup options and said "don't reboot on
>> failure" (or whatever the wording is), which allowed me to capture the
>> Stop code: 0x8e.
>>
>> I ran Windows Memory test overnight and after 145 passes, it found no
>> errors so I think I'm safe there.
>>
>> Also, I can't boot into safe mode. It does the same thing.
>>
>> Ideas? Is it actually a bad CPU or Windows just being annoying?
>>
>> Thanks,
>> Colin
>>

>
> Did you make sure the BIOS was updated to the suggested minimum version first ?
>
> http://www.msi.com/product/mb/P35-Ne...div=CPUSupport
>
> http://www.msi.com/product/mb/P35-Neo2.html#/?div=BIOS
>
> Other than that, you're going from FSB800 to FSB1333, and if you were
> previously overclocking, you might have a RAM divider set improperly
> or something.
>
> It could be a bad CPU. That's certainly possible.
>
> You could go into the BIOS, record any custom settings necessary to
> get the computer to boot. Then, shut down and "clear CMOS" and
> enter the BIOS settings again. Choices such as "Auto" in the BIOS,
> should select stock frequencies for things. The only thing you have
> to watch, is that you get the boot order set up properly again,
> and the disk interface in the right mode (IDE, AHCI, RAID etc).
>
> Instead of testing with Windows, when you make major hardware
> changes, you can instead test with a Linux LiveCD, as that
> doesn't reference the hard drives at all. You can go to mersenne.org/freesoft
> and get a copy of Prime95, and use that as a load test. There is a
> Linux version, as well as a Windows version. So you can do some
> basic stability testing, from Linux. But only do that, after
> you've done some checking about BIOS version, cleared CMOS
> (with all power removed from the system). Then, it should be
> safe to set things up again, and do some testing from say
> a Ubuntu LiveCD. If a LiveCD crashes, no one gets hurt. You
> can leave the hard drives disconnected for safety while
> doing that. That way, there is less likely to be some kind
> of corruption on the hard drive.
>
> The BIOS should be flashed, while your old stable processor
> is inserted. Once the new BIOS is in place, you can install
> the new processor. If your setup is at all unstable, it
> generally isn't a good idea to flash the BIOS in that state.
> Even with a dual BIOS motherboard, there is some danger involved.
>
> Your "8e" error is "KERNEL_MODE_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED". When
> you get a BSOD, it's a good idea to write down the driver
> name or the like, if it is printed on the screen. The kernel
> can be tipped over by a driver.
>
> http://aumha.org/a/stop.htm
>
> I wouldn't have thought your processor was so radically different,
> that Windows is getting tripped up. Your E2200 is a dual core,
> and so is the E8500, and they're both Core2 processors.
> What's not to like ? I would think the same HAL driver would
> work. Activation might be affected, if enough hardware changes
> have accumulated, but you'd have already heard about that
> from the computer, if that was the case. And activation
> shouldn't be crashing the kernel. Something else is doing that.
>
> http://ark.intel.com/products/33925/...Hz-800-MHz-FSB)
>
> http://aumha.org/win5/a/wpa.htm
>
> I'm assuming here, that your E8500 is brand new. If you got the
> E8500 off Ebay, it could have been tortured by it's previous
> owner, made to drink liquid nitrogen and the like. If it's brand
> new, then you know it hasn't been abused. Batches of bad processors
> do escape the fab, but not that often. In terms of the quality of
> testing, they generally give the processors a good test before
> shipping them. Cheaper parts ($0.25 ICs) don't get nearly as much
> testing.
>
> Paul


 
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BillW50
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      28th Dec 2011
In news:jd3pq3$qsn$(E-Mail Removed),
philo wrote:
> On 12/23/2011 05:05 PM, BillW50 wrote:
>> On 12/23/2011 4:38 PM, philo wrote:
>>> It's essentially impossible for a CPU to be bad if the machine
>>> boots.

>>
>> I don't know about that! I've seen some bad CPUs that would boot
>> some OS.

>
> Anything is possible
> but in the ten+ years I've been doing repairs
> I've only seen one dead cpu...and it was a dead-duck 100% failure.
>
> It was one I had inadvertently over-voltaged
> (back in the days of settable jumpers)


I've seen CPUs crippled due to the lack of cooling. And they would pass
POST and boot up some OS and not others. In fact, I have an Intel
Celeron 370 right here which you can have if you would like to play with
that acts just this way. There was nothing wrong with the cooling system
per se, just the motherboard misread the CPU temp 10F lower than normal
at idle and 40F lower at max. Thus it saw no need to run the fan on
high to cool down the CPU.

--
Bill
Gateway M465e ('06 era) - OE-QuoteFix v1.19.2
Centrino Core Duo T2400 1.83GHz - 2GB - Windows XP SP3


 
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Char Jackson
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Posts: n/a
 
      28th Dec 2011
On Wed, 28 Dec 2011 13:10:19 -0600, "BillW50" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>I've seen CPUs crippled due to the lack of cooling. And they would pass
>POST and boot up some OS and not others. In fact, I have an Intel
>Celeron 370 right here which you can have if you would like to play with
>that acts just this way. There was nothing wrong with the cooling system
>per se, just the motherboard misread the CPU temp 10F lower than normal
>at idle and 40F lower at max. Thus it saw no need to run the fan on
>high to cool down the CPU.


Just wire the CPU fan to run at full speed all the time. Too noisy?

 
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philo
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Posts: n/a
 
      29th Dec 2011
On 12/28/2011 01:10 PM, BillW50 wrote:
> In news:jd3pq3$qsn$(E-Mail Removed),
> philo wrote:
>> On 12/23/2011 05:05 PM, BillW50 wrote:
>>> On 12/23/2011 4:38 PM, philo wrote:
>>>> It's essentially impossible for a CPU to be bad if the machine
>>>> boots.
>>>
>>> I don't know about that! I've seen some bad CPUs that would boot
>>> some OS.

>>
>> Anything is possible
>> but in the ten+ years I've been doing repairs
>> I've only seen one dead cpu...and it was a dead-duck 100% failure.
>>
>> It was one I had inadvertently over-voltaged
>> (back in the days of settable jumpers)

>
> I've seen CPUs crippled due to the lack of cooling. And they would pass
> POST and boot up some OS and not others. In fact, I have an Intel
> Celeron 370 right here which you can have if you would like to play with
> that acts just this way.


You don't need to send it to me , I believe you!

Just about anything is possible


There was nothing wrong with the cooling system
> per se, just the motherboard misread the CPU temp 10F lower than normal
> at idle and 40F lower at max. Thus it saw no need to run the fan on
> high to cool down the CPU.
>


 
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