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media streaming from router's USB network drive to TV doesn't work

 
 
GMAN
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      15th Mar 2012
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Peter <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>In article <CX58r.120144$(E-Mail Removed)1.easynews.com>,
>(E-Mail Removed) says...
>> In article

> <(E-Mail Removed)>, Flasherly
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> >On Mar 13, 4:23 pm, WindowsAssassin <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> >> Hello,
>> >>
>> >> Media streaming of video files on my pc via the wireless router to my
>> >> TV works well using Windows Media Player with media streaming enabled.
>> >>
>> >> However, when I copy these exact same video files to an external hard
>> >> drive that is attached to the router via USB, I can see the video
>> >> files on my TV but the names are greyed out and I cannot select them
>> >> to play on the TV, as if the file format is not supported.
>> >>
>> >> Why is this? The purpose of copying the video files to the external
>> >> drive is that I want to be able to stream and watch video's on my TV
>> >> without the need to have my pc turned on.
>> >

>
>Sorry, I'm a bit behind on the discussion. Does the TV support playing
>of media files directly without any other external media player being
>required to play those files? Have you confirmed this works? Does the TV
>have USB to allow a direct connection to test this out?
>


google "DLNA"


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital...twork_Alliance

Pretty much the standard all media players follow today
 
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GMAN
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Posts: n/a
 
      15th Mar 2012
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Flasherly <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>On Mar 15, 5:23 am, Peter <(E-Mail Removed)>
>wrote:
>>
>> Sorry, I'm a bit behind on the discussion. Does the TV support playing
>> of media files directly without any other external media player being
>> required to play those files? Have you confirmed this works? Does the TV
>> have USB to allow a direct connection to test this out?

>
>Probably not. There's only a few such concoctions floating around
>with chipped decoder circuitry for maybe premier service provider
>contracts. Stuff like Sony Entertainment with the corporate umph
>behind it to make it fly. Not the sorts of things apt to be found in
>Wallymart. Last I looked their likes require service distribution
>centers to agree to pricing contracts before they can carry the
>brands. Hence the convenience takes they play about adding it "your
>cart" before knowing how much they're into "your wallet" -- of course
>requiring that cart first be registered. Let the advertising games
>begin anew. Like my new car with a base model requirement in
>collusion with Sirius XM satellite streaming, or the $1000 pressure
>system monitor off batteries installed into tire valve stems.
>Lobbyists hard at work safely insuring four 10-cent battery
>replacements are factory certified at an additional $500. Curious if
>Cisco is now chipping routers with an interplay off Microsoft's newest
>media offerings.



OMG, most decent Tv's,blu ray players, gaming devices have DNLA capabilities
now.

 
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Ting Hsu
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Posts: n/a
 
      15th Mar 2012
Wow, lots and lots of misinformation on this topic, enough that it
seems that I'm the only one who has ever streamed video to my TV
without a PC involved.

The DLNA specifies 3 things: a server, a renderer, and a controller.

You need all three parts to actually view a video file on your TV.

But here's the rub: you only need 1 part to be compliant with DLNA.

In the original poster's set up, the one that worked, here's what the
3 parts were.

Server = Router with USB hard drive
Renderer = Windows Media Player on his PC
Controller = TV

The original poster assumed that if he got rid of the "renderer", that
everything would just magically work, because everything was DLNA
compliant. But the router is only compatible with the "server" part of
the DLNA and the TV is only compatible with the "controller" part of
the DLNA. He still needs the "renderer" part in order for everything
to work (and his router ain't it; in fact, I don't know of a single
router that can do the "renderer" portion of the DLNA).

The most common way to get a standalone "renderer" is to build, buy,
or hack a device to provide it. On the buy side, just look up Boxee
Box or WD TV Live as your starting points.
--
// T.Hsu
 
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delta007bhd@gmail.com
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Posts: n/a
 
      16th Mar 2012
On Thursday, 15 March 2012 19:26:27 UTC+1, GMAN wrote:
> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Ting Hsu <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> >On Mar 13, 4:23=A0pm, WindowsAssassin <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> >> Linksys WRT610N simultaneous dual band router
> >> Home cinema that supports DLNA

> >
> >According to the user guide, this router does not actually stream
> >anything; it can store files, not stream them. You need an external
> >media player to stream. Nearly all routers that claim to be "media
> >streaming routers" have this same problem - they only store files, not
> >stream them.
> >http://homedownloads.cisco.com/downl..._UG_NC-WEB.pd=
> >f
> >
> >In addition, it is obvious that your TV does not have a media player
> >built into it. I cannot tell for sure, since you neglected to mention
> >the make/model of your TV, but that's my guess.
> >
> >Thus you need a media player somewhere on your network, which means
> >your choices are...
> >
> >1. Buy a media playing device, like a Boxee Box, or
> >2. Build a media playing device, like an HTPC (home theater PC), or
> >3. Hack an XBox360 or Apple TV with XBMC (a media playing app), or
> >4. Buy an internet ready TV that can play common video formats (I
> >would bring a video on a usb drive to test it in the store). As you
> >now know, not all internet ready TVs support playback of video files.

>
>
> The WRT610N has a built in uPnP/DNLA media server, but you have to turn the
> feature on in the router
>
>
>
> http://www6.nohold.net/Cisco2/ukp.
> aspx?vw=1&docid=d6dc548e38a24088b760cfa3fb190797_17403.xml&pid=96&slnid=3
>
>
> The OP needs to read chapter 3 of the owners manual and it tells you how to
> setup the server in the router
>
> http://homedownloads.cisco.com/downl..._UG_NC-WEB.pdf


The UPnP Media Server is enabled in the web based configuration page of my router. I also formatted the hard drive from there (the router needs it to be FAT32) and then created a folder and scanned the folder from the router webpage.
 
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Flasherly
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Posts: n/a
 
      16th Mar 2012
On Mar 15, 2:32 pm, (E-Mail Removed) (GMAN) wrote:
>
> OMG, most decent Tv's,blu ray players, gaming devices have DNLA capabilities
> now.


Yea -- I hear you, although there's something indecent about DNLA that
stinks to me. It's all digital streams variously for processing, so
adding another connection and support chip for the TeeVee, another
BRay or game box stacked beside or on top a computer -- they're
negating the computer for, lo & behold, sector specific niches of
dedicated in-house subscription equipment. . . .Bah, and bugger 'em
bloody by the scores. Duplicating with lesser equipment what a
decent computer should be able to better achieve. Never spent anything
more than needed just for hardware, know most *all* the freeware
counterparts among useful software, quit games long time ago, no
teevee other than a seldom used aerial, though I do still shop at
Walmart, which is still, of sorts, an indecent place. I wasn't always
this way, of course; just had to work hard at it.

-
They don't get that way for nothing. -Old Greek proverb.
 
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Flasherly
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Posts: n/a
 
      16th Mar 2012
On Mar 14, 8:05 pm, (E-Mail Removed) wrote:

>
> So I copied different video file types onto the external hard drive now to test. An MP4, 2 AVI's, and an MPG video file. All are greyed out except for the MPG which streams and plays fine on my tv. Note that the other videofiles stream fine as well but from my pc to the tv and not from the usb drive.


Yep. That figures: surprise, surprise <NOT> MPEG2 is the IS <industry
standard> for broadcasting satellite streams, least last I looked.
 
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Paul
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Posts: n/a
 
      16th Mar 2012
(E-Mail Removed) wrote:
> On Thursday, 15 March 2012 19:26:27 UTC+1, GMAN wrote:
>> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Ting Hsu <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>> On Mar 13, 4:23=A0pm, WindowsAssassin <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>> Linksys WRT610N simultaneous dual band router
>>>> Home cinema that supports DLNA
>>> According to the user guide, this router does not actually stream
>>> anything; it can store files, not stream them. You need an external
>>> media player to stream. Nearly all routers that claim to be "media
>>> streaming routers" have this same problem - they only store files, not
>>> stream them.
>>> http://homedownloads.cisco.com/downl..._UG_NC-WEB.pd=
>>> f
>>>
>>> In addition, it is obvious that your TV does not have a media player
>>> built into it. I cannot tell for sure, since you neglected to mention
>>> the make/model of your TV, but that's my guess.
>>>
>>> Thus you need a media player somewhere on your network, which means
>>> your choices are...
>>>
>>> 1. Buy a media playing device, like a Boxee Box, or
>>> 2. Build a media playing device, like an HTPC (home theater PC), or
>>> 3. Hack an XBox360 or Apple TV with XBMC (a media playing app), or
>>> 4. Buy an internet ready TV that can play common video formats (I
>>> would bring a video on a usb drive to test it in the store). As you
>>> now know, not all internet ready TVs support playback of video files.

>>
>> The WRT610N has a built in uPnP/DNLA media server, but you have to turn the
>> feature on in the router
>>
>>
>>
>> http://www6.nohold.net/Cisco2/ukp.
>> aspx?vw=1&docid=d6dc548e38a24088b760cfa3fb190797_17403.xml&pid=96&slnid=3
>>
>>
>> The OP needs to read chapter 3 of the owners manual and it tells you how to
>> setup the server in the router
>>
>> http://homedownloads.cisco.com/downl..._UG_NC-WEB.pdf

>
> The UPnP Media Server is enabled in the web based configuration page of my router. I also formatted the hard drive from there (the router needs it to be FAT32) and then created a folder and scanned the folder from the router webpage.


So if I'm following all this now, you've succeeded in getting one format,
to play from WRT610N to TV, the MPG video file.

Now, have you cracked open the TV spec, to see what it mentions in the
way of movie file formats ?

I checked a thread just now, and the TV in their example, had a
chart of formats. The claim in the thread, is DLNA narrows
down the scope of uPnP, and so not a lot of formats are
supported. So this is the kind of chart you're looking for in
the TV manual.

http://i397.photobucket.com/albums/p...ech/Page82.jpg

The thread I saw is here. And the person who provided that page from
a manual, claims you have to match the details pretty exactly, for
it to work.

http://forums.cnet.com/7723-13973_10...ats-supported/

Paul
 
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Rodney Pont
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Posts: n/a
 
      16th Mar 2012
On Thu, 15 Mar 2012 16:33:42 -0700 (PDT), (E-Mail Removed) wrote:

>The UPnP Media Server is enabled in the web based configuration page of my router. I also formatted the hard drive from there (the router needs it to be FAT32) and then created a folder and scanned the folder from the router webpage.


It sounds like you need to convert the files to a format that your TV
understands using something like avs4you <http://www.avs4you.com>.

--
Regards - Rodney Pont
The from address exists but is mostly dumped,
please send any emails to the address below
e-mail rpont (at) gmail (dot) com


 
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delta007bhd@gmail.com
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Posts: n/a
 
      16th Mar 2012
On Friday, 16 March 2012 01:18:29 UTC+1, Paul wrote:
> (E-Mail Removed) wrote:
> > On Thursday, 15 March 2012 19:26:27 UTC+1, GMAN wrote:
> >> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Ting Hsu <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> >>> On Mar 13, 4:23=A0pm, WindowsAssassin <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> >>>> Linksys WRT610N simultaneous dual band router
> >>>> Home cinema that supports DLNA
> >>> According to the user guide, this router does not actually stream
> >>> anything; it can store files, not stream them. You need an external
> >>> media player to stream. Nearly all routers that claim to be "media
> >>> streaming routers" have this same problem - they only store files, not
> >>> stream them.
> >>> http://homedownloads.cisco.com/downl..._UG_NC-WEB.pd=
> >>> f
> >>>
> >>> In addition, it is obvious that your TV does not have a media player
> >>> built into it. I cannot tell for sure, since you neglected to mention
> >>> the make/model of your TV, but that's my guess.
> >>>
> >>> Thus you need a media player somewhere on your network, which means
> >>> your choices are...
> >>>
> >>> 1. Buy a media playing device, like a Boxee Box, or
> >>> 2. Build a media playing device, like an HTPC (home theater PC), or
> >>> 3. Hack an XBox360 or Apple TV with XBMC (a media playing app), or
> >>> 4. Buy an internet ready TV that can play common video formats (I
> >>> would bring a video on a usb drive to test it in the store). As you
> >>> now know, not all internet ready TVs support playback of video files.
> >>
> >> The WRT610N has a built in uPnP/DNLA media server, but you have to turn the
> >> feature on in the router
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> http://www6.nohold.net/Cisco2/ukp.
> >> aspx?vw=1&docid=d6dc548e38a24088b760cfa3fb190797_17403.xml&pid=96&slnid=3
> >>
> >>
> >> The OP needs to read chapter 3 of the owners manual and it tells you how to
> >> setup the server in the router
> >>
> >> http://homedownloads.cisco.com/downl..._UG_NC-WEB.pdf

> >
> > The UPnP Media Server is enabled in the web based configuration page ofmy router. I also formatted the hard drive from there (the router needs itto be FAT32) and then created a folder and scanned the folder from the router webpage.

>
> So if I'm following all this now, you've succeeded in getting one format,
> to play from WRT610N to TV, the MPG video file.
>
> Now, have you cracked open the TV spec, to see what it mentions in the
> way of movie file formats ?
>
> I checked a thread just now, and the TV in their example, had a
> chart of formats. The claim in the thread, is DLNA narrows
> down the scope of uPnP, and so not a lot of formats are
> supported. So this is the kind of chart you're looking for in
> the TV manual.
>
> http://i397.photobucket.com/albums/p...ech/Page82.jpg
>
> The thread I saw is here. And the person who provided that page from
> a manual, claims you have to match the details pretty exactly, for
> it to work.
>
> http://forums.cnet.com/7723-13973_10...ats-supported/
>
> Paul




On Friday, 16 March 2012 01:18:29 UTC+1, Paul wrote:
> (E-Mail Removed) wrote:
> > On Thursday, 15 March 2012 19:26:27 UTC+1, GMAN wrote:
> >> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Ting Hsu <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> >>> On Mar 13, 4:23=A0pm, WindowsAssassin <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> >>>> Linksys WRT610N simultaneous dual band router
> >>>> Home cinema that supports DLNA
> >>> According to the user guide, this router does not actually stream
> >>> anything; it can store files, not stream them. You need an external
> >>> media player to stream. Nearly all routers that claim to be "media
> >>> streaming routers" have this same problem - they only store files, not
> >>> stream them.
> >>> http://homedownloads.cisco.com/downl..._UG_NC-WEB.pd=
> >>> f
> >>>
> >>> In addition, it is obvious that your TV does not have a media player
> >>> built into it. I cannot tell for sure, since you neglected to mention
> >>> the make/model of your TV, but that's my guess.
> >>>
> >>> Thus you need a media player somewhere on your network, which means
> >>> your choices are...
> >>>
> >>> 1. Buy a media playing device, like a Boxee Box, or
> >>> 2. Build a media playing device, like an HTPC (home theater PC), or
> >>> 3. Hack an XBox360 or Apple TV with XBMC (a media playing app), or
> >>> 4. Buy an internet ready TV that can play common video formats (I
> >>> would bring a video on a usb drive to test it in the store). As you
> >>> now know, not all internet ready TVs support playback of video files.
> >>
> >> The WRT610N has a built in uPnP/DNLA media server, but you have to turn the
> >> feature on in the router
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> http://www6.nohold.net/Cisco2/ukp.
> >> aspx?vw=1&docid=d6dc548e38a24088b760cfa3fb190797_17403.xml&pid=96&slnid=3
> >>
> >>
> >> The OP needs to read chapter 3 of the owners manual and it tells you how to
> >> setup the server in the router
> >>
> >> http://homedownloads.cisco.com/downl..._UG_NC-WEB.pdf

> >
> > The UPnP Media Server is enabled in the web based configuration page ofmy router. I also formatted the hard drive from there (the router needs itto be FAT32) and then created a folder and scanned the folder from the router webpage.

>
> So if I'm following all this now, you've succeeded in getting one format,
> to play from WRT610N to TV, the MPG video file.
>
> Now, have you cracked open the TV spec, to see what it mentions in the
> way of movie file formats ?
>
> I checked a thread just now, and the TV in their example, had a
> chart of formats. The claim in the thread, is DLNA narrows
> down the scope of uPnP, and so not a lot of formats are
> supported. So this is the kind of chart you're looking for in
> the TV manual.
>
> http://i397.photobucket.com/albums/p...ech/Page82.jpg
>
> The thread I saw is here. And the person who provided that page from
> a manual, claims you have to match the details pretty exactly, for
> it to work.
>
> http://forums.cnet.com/7723-13973_10...ats-supported/
>
> Paul




On Friday, 16 March 2012 01:18:29 UTC+1, Paul wrote:
> (E-Mail Removed) wrote:
> > On Thursday, 15 March 2012 19:26:27 UTC+1, GMAN wrote:
> >> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Ting Hsu <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> >>> On Mar 13, 4:23=A0pm, WindowsAssassin <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> >>>> Linksys WRT610N simultaneous dual band router
> >>>> Home cinema that supports DLNA
> >>> According to the user guide, this router does not actually stream
> >>> anything; it can store files, not stream them. You need an external
> >>> media player to stream. Nearly all routers that claim to be "media
> >>> streaming routers" have this same problem - they only store files, not
> >>> stream them.
> >>> http://homedownloads.cisco.com/downl..._UG_NC-WEB.pd=
> >>> f
> >>>
> >>> In addition, it is obvious that your TV does not have a media player
> >>> built into it. I cannot tell for sure, since you neglected to mention
> >>> the make/model of your TV, but that's my guess.
> >>>
> >>> Thus you need a media player somewhere on your network, which means
> >>> your choices are...
> >>>
> >>> 1. Buy a media playing device, like a Boxee Box, or
> >>> 2. Build a media playing device, like an HTPC (home theater PC), or
> >>> 3. Hack an XBox360 or Apple TV with XBMC (a media playing app), or
> >>> 4. Buy an internet ready TV that can play common video formats (I
> >>> would bring a video on a usb drive to test it in the store). As you
> >>> now know, not all internet ready TVs support playback of video files.
> >>
> >> The WRT610N has a built in uPnP/DNLA media server, but you have to turn the
> >> feature on in the router
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> http://www6.nohold.net/Cisco2/ukp.
> >> aspx?vw=1&docid=d6dc548e38a24088b760cfa3fb190797_17403.xml&pid=96&slnid=3
> >>
> >>
> >> The OP needs to read chapter 3 of the owners manual and it tells you how to
> >> setup the server in the router
> >>
> >> http://homedownloads.cisco.com/downl..._UG_NC-WEB.pdf

> >
> > The UPnP Media Server is enabled in the web based configuration page ofmy router. I also formatted the hard drive from there (the router needs itto be FAT32) and then created a folder and scanned the folder from the router webpage.

>
> So if I'm following all this now, you've succeeded in getting one format,
> to play from WRT610N to TV, the MPG video file.
>
> Now, have you cracked open the TV spec, to see what it mentions in the
> way of movie file formats ?
>
> I checked a thread just now, and the TV in their example, had a
> chart of formats. The claim in the thread, is DLNA narrows
> down the scope of uPnP, and so not a lot of formats are
> supported. So this is the kind of chart you're looking for in
> the TV manual.
>
> http://i397.photobucket.com/albums/p...ech/Page82.jpg
>
> The thread I saw is here. And the person who provided that page from
> a manual, claims you have to match the details pretty exactly, for
> it to work.
>
> http://forums.cnet.com/7723-13973_10...ats-supported/
>
> Paul




On Friday, 16 March 2012 01:18:29 UTC+1, Paul wrote:
> (E-Mail Removed) wrote:
> > On Thursday, 15 March 2012 19:26:27 UTC+1, GMAN wrote:
> >> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Ting Hsu <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> >>> On Mar 13, 4:23=A0pm, WindowsAssassin <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> >>>> Linksys WRT610N simultaneous dual band router
> >>>> Home cinema that supports DLNA
> >>> According to the user guide, this router does not actually stream
> >>> anything; it can store files, not stream them. You need an external
> >>> media player to stream. Nearly all routers that claim to be "media
> >>> streaming routers" have this same problem - they only store files, not
> >>> stream them.
> >>> http://homedownloads.cisco.com/downl..._UG_NC-WEB.pd=
> >>> f
> >>>
> >>> In addition, it is obvious that your TV does not have a media player
> >>> built into it. I cannot tell for sure, since you neglected to mention
> >>> the make/model of your TV, but that's my guess.
> >>>
> >>> Thus you need a media player somewhere on your network, which means
> >>> your choices are...
> >>>
> >>> 1. Buy a media playing device, like a Boxee Box, or
> >>> 2. Build a media playing device, like an HTPC (home theater PC), or
> >>> 3. Hack an XBox360 or Apple TV with XBMC (a media playing app), or
> >>> 4. Buy an internet ready TV that can play common video formats (I
> >>> would bring a video on a usb drive to test it in the store). As you
> >>> now know, not all internet ready TVs support playback of video files.
> >>
> >> The WRT610N has a built in uPnP/DNLA media server, but you have to turn the
> >> feature on in the router
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> http://www6.nohold.net/Cisco2/ukp.
> >> aspx?vw=1&docid=d6dc548e38a24088b760cfa3fb190797_17403.xml&pid=96&slnid=3
> >>
> >>
> >> The OP needs to read chapter 3 of the owners manual and it tells you how to
> >> setup the server in the router
> >>
> >> http://homedownloads.cisco.com/downl..._UG_NC-WEB.pdf

> >
> > The UPnP Media Server is enabled in the web based configuration page ofmy router. I also formatted the hard drive from there (the router needs itto be FAT32) and then created a folder and scanned the folder from the router webpage.

>
> So if I'm following all this now, you've succeeded in getting one format,
> to play from WRT610N to TV, the MPG video file.
>
> Now, have you cracked open the TV spec, to see what it mentions in the
> way of movie file formats ?
>
> I checked a thread just now, and the TV in their example, had a
> chart of formats. The claim in the thread, is DLNA narrows
> down the scope of uPnP, and so not a lot of formats are
> supported. So this is the kind of chart you're looking for in
> the TV manual.
>
> http://i397.photobucket.com/albums/p...ech/Page82.jpg
>
> The thread I saw is here. And the person who provided that page from
> a manual, claims you have to match the details pretty exactly, for
> it to work.
>
> http://forums.cnet.com/7723-13973_10...ats-supported/
>
> Paul


Right, so to summarise: streaming avi from running pc with windows media player streaming turned on to the tv works fine. Then, when I copy those sameavi files onto a portable hard disk that is attached to my router's usb port, my tv cannot play the avi's anymore (greyed out). The hard disk is formatted using the router's webpage and a shared folder has been enabled as well as media server. My tv can see the shared media but cannot play it. EXCEPT if I copy an mpg onto the disk, this plays fine. I'm totally confused and a total noob about this. If they tell me the router and tv and so on support UPnP and media sharing and usb hard drives and sh*t, I get ****ed when it doesn't play the media.

I might have overlooked stuff since I'm just not into this stuff but I can't find any info such as "beware, beware, you cannot play avi files with this device", neither in the router's manual and neither in the tv manual.

The only chart you talked about I found is page 8 in the blu-ray manual:
http://service.us.panasonic.com/OPERMANPDF/SCBT730.PDF
I don't know why the f**k this is but in this english manual there is no DivX while in my paper manual there is DivX for DVD and BD. Hell, I don't even know where to look anymore, do you look in the tv manual, the blu-ray player manual, the router manual, does it have something to do with codecs on my pc or windows media player, my external disk,...

All this technology and gimmicks will ultimately lead to the decay and fallof our western civilisation, just like the roman empire went down.

 
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Paul
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      16th Mar 2012
(E-Mail Removed) wrote:

>
> Right, so to summarise: streaming avi from running pc with windows media player
> streaming turned on to the tv works fine. Then, when I copy those same avi files
> onto a portable hard disk that is attached to my router's usb port, my tv cannot
> play the avi's anymore (greyed out). The hard disk is formatted using the router's
> webpage and a shared folder has been enabled as well as media server. My tv can
> see the shared media but cannot play it. EXCEPT if I copy an mpg onto the disk,
> this plays fine. I'm totally confused and a total noob about this. If they tell
> me the router and tv and so on support UPnP and media sharing and usb hard drives
> and sh*t, I get ****ed when it doesn't play the media.
>
> I might have overlooked stuff since I'm just not into this stuff but I can't find
> any info such as "beware, beware, you cannot play avi files with this device",
> neither in the router's manual and neither in the tv manual.
>
> The only chart you talked about I found is page 8 in the blu-ray manual:
> http://service.us.panasonic.com/OPERMANPDF/SCBT730.PDF
> I don't know why the f**k this is but in this english manual there is no DivX
> while in my paper manual there is DivX for DVD and BD. Hell, I don't even know
> where to look anymore, do you look in the tv manual, the blu-ray player manual,
> the router manual, does it have something to do with codecs on my pc or windows
> media player, my external disk,...
>
> All this technology and gimmicks will ultimately lead to the decay and fall of
> our western civilisation, just like the roman empire went down.


I always think in terms of the client/server model. One device is a server, the
other is a client. Both have limited intelligence, and sometimes, not even the
manual does justice to the subject. For example, your router won't eat an NTFS
disk drive, and goes with FAT32. And has the usual size limit as well. I don't
think it can accept a 2TB drive. The limit is likely a bit less than that.
I've seen that kind of limit on some NAS boxes, but I'm hard pressed to
explain the number. When a NAS box says "200GB limit", I just throw my hands
in the air, because there is *no* capacity limit in the designs, at the
200GB point. Or at 500GB, or 750GB for that matter. The only capacity
limits I'm aware of, are at 137GB (48bitLBA) and 2.2TB (32 bit sector number).

In this case, both the router and the TV have manuals. The router manual,
is going to acknowledge what formats the router will scan and present
in a menu to other devices. The router is a server, but it may not "stream"
any old thing it finds. If it found a copy of the US Constitution on the
hard drive, it's going to take a pass on that and not bother. Eventually,
after it "scans" the folder, it's ready to pass a "menu" to the other machine.

The client has two interests. It wants to see the "menu", kinda like the
equivalent of a "dir" or "list directory" command. But it's also going
to want to know what kind of movies they are. I presume the "scanning"
the router does, is to classify the movies. The TV will only have certain
licensed codecs in its bag of tools, and the formats supported are going
to be Hollywood formats. So if some Linux guy comes up with something
called "ogg", even though "ogg" is free, the TV is going to laugh at
that format. Maybe the TV company paid $1 for an mp4 license and the
ability to use a codec for it. They're going to want to handle whatever
movie format comes on a DVD, that kind of thing. They're not trying to
build an "all purpose jukebox" in the TV. And apparently, DLNA attempts
to do that, pointing to a limited set of formats as targets for the
client and server. The router isn't DLNA, so may be a bit more open
ended on formats, but you say your TV is DLNA.

If your computer and Windows Media Player, are able to play all the
content, then the router ("server") is able to successfully serve the
movies. If the TV won't touch the meal its served, then we need to
crack the TV manual, as I stated before.

Please provide either the TV make and model, or the URL of the TV
manual itself. There's got to be a table in there, similar to the
example I dug up. If not, the table of formats is floating around
on the Internet, and when you post the make and model, we can look
it up.

Paul
 
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