PC Review


Reply
Thread Tools Rate Thread

Livestock management

 
 
Eric
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      1st May 2009
Hi.. does anybody know if there are any access databases specifically built
for livestock management ? I am new to access and wondering if there is one
or might there be another type of template that will work.. am looking for
something to track the calves, sickness, selling, etc
--or could somebody possibly point me in the right direction to post in the
correct subforum if I have posted in the wrong place

thanks in advance..
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Jeff Conrad [MSFT]
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      1st May 2009
Hi Eric,

This might not be exactly what you want, but have you seen this?
http://www.equinemax.com

--
Jeff Conrad - Access Junkie - MVP Alumnus
SDET II - Access Test Team - Microsoft Corporation

Co-author - Microsoft Office Access 2007 Inside Out
Presenter - Microsoft Access 2007 Essentials
http://www.accessmvp.com/JConrad/accessjunkie.html
Access 2007 Info: http://www.AccessJunkie.com

----------
This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.
Use of included script samples are subject to the terms specified at
http://www.microsoft.com/info/cpyright.mspx
----------

"Eric" wrote in message:
news:(E-Mail Removed)...

> Hi.. does anybody know if there are any access databases specifically
> built
> for livestock management ? I am new to access and wondering if there is
> one
> or might there be another type of template that will work.. am looking for
> something to track the calves, sickness, selling, etc
> --or could somebody possibly point me in the right direction to post in
> the
> correct subforum if I have posted in the wrong place



 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
John W. Vinson
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      1st May 2009
On Fri, 1 May 2009 07:55:00 -0700, Eric <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>Hi.. does anybody know if there are any access databases specifically built
>for livestock management ? I am new to access and wondering if there is one
>or might there be another type of template that will work.. am looking for
>something to track the calves, sickness, selling, etc
> --or could somebody possibly point me in the right direction to post in the
>correct subforum if I have posted in the wrong place
>
> thanks in advance..


Most of the discussion here has to do, not with prebuilt templates or
applications, but with help in building your own from the ground up. It's sort
of the difference between going to the lumberyard and buying a storage shed,
or buying 2x4s, nails, shingles and so on.

If you're interested in some 2x4's and how to use them see
Jeff Conrad's resources page:
http://www.accessmvp.com/JConrad/acc...resources.html

The Access Web resources page:
http://www.mvps.org/access/resources/index.html

A free tutorial written by Crystal (MS Access MVP):
http://allenbrowne.com/casu-22.html

A video how-to series by Crystal:
http://www.YouTube.com/user/LearnAccessByCrystal

MVP Allen Browne's tutorials:
http://allenbrowne.com/links.html#Tutorials

--

John W. Vinson [MVP]
 
Reply With Quote
 
Eric
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      1st May 2009
thanks for the responses.. I am still a newbie to access.. might there be
some templates that are not specifically for livestock, but may work in a
round-about way ?

"John W. Vinson" wrote:

> On Fri, 1 May 2009 07:55:00 -0700, Eric <(E-Mail Removed)>
> wrote:
>
> >Hi.. does anybody know if there are any access databases specifically built
> >for livestock management ? I am new to access and wondering if there is one
> >or might there be another type of template that will work.. am looking for
> >something to track the calves, sickness, selling, etc
> > --or could somebody possibly point me in the right direction to post in the
> >correct subforum if I have posted in the wrong place
> >
> > thanks in advance..

>
> Most of the discussion here has to do, not with prebuilt templates or
> applications, but with help in building your own from the ground up. It's sort
> of the difference between going to the lumberyard and buying a storage shed,
> or buying 2x4s, nails, shingles and so on.
>
> If you're interested in some 2x4's and how to use them see
> Jeff Conrad's resources page:
> http://www.accessmvp.com/JConrad/acc...resources.html
>
> The Access Web resources page:
> http://www.mvps.org/access/resources/index.html
>
> A free tutorial written by Crystal (MS Access MVP):
> http://allenbrowne.com/casu-22.html
>
> A video how-to series by Crystal:
> http://www.YouTube.com/user/LearnAccessByCrystal
>
> MVP Allen Browne's tutorials:
> http://allenbrowne.com/links.html#Tutorials
>
> --
>
> John W. Vinson [MVP]
>

 
Reply With Quote
 
Fred
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      1st May 2009
This looks like an easy application, but very specialized. My guess is that
it would be more difficult and more work to adapt a different "template" than
to build it from scratch.

If you are up for investing sme time and effort in learning Access, you
might start by reading a few of those things that the other posters
recommended, plus post a more detailed description of waht you want to
database and ask for help / recommendations on a table stucture foundation.

If not, you might considere hiring a developer to make one for you, or to
search the livestock industry for software.
 
Reply With Quote
 
Paul Shapiro
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      2nd May 2009
I would take this advice one step further, and suggest that there is
probably a lot more complication to this application than is first apparent.
I would recommend searching for a commercial application. This seems like a
big enough industry there must be at least a few applications available.
Investigate carefully to be SURE it is specified as meeting all of your
needs (don't believe promises of "easy customization") and contact at least
a few users to see if they agree with the marketing claims. Get a demo
version of the software and test it VERY thoroughly before purchase.

As a custom developer, I think it's very hard (or expensive) for a custom
system to be better than a commercial application that's being used by many
diverse users. The commercial system developers have had the benefits of
refining application requirements both over a longer time and with more
users. They hopefully had more money available to invest in program
improvements, since they were being supported by a larger user base.

If you're doing this more for your own enjoyment and the satisfaction of
having built your own application, that's different. But if you're purpose
is the most cost-effective way to get an application that does a good job
running your business, I think you should at least start with the idea of
exhausting the commercial market before you consider building your own. You
said you were new to Access, which puts a pretty significant learning step
in the path. If you're also new to database design and development in
general, then it's a very large step. Nothing wrong with doing that
learning, but you shouldn't think it's the same as building a simple
spreadsheet.

"Fred" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> This looks like an easy application, but very specialized. My guess is
> that
> it would be more difficult and more work to adapt a different "template"
> than
> to build it from scratch.
>
> If you are up for investing sme time and effort in learning Access, you
> might start by reading a few of those things that the other posters
> recommended, plus post a more detailed description of waht you want to
> database and ask for help / recommendations on a table stucture
> foundation.
>
> If not, you might considere hiring a developer to make one for you, or to
> search the livestock industry for software.


 
Reply With Quote
 
Eric
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      2nd May 2009
Thanks for the replies and advice.. I will look more into some of the
commercial programs
Eric

"Paul Shapiro" wrote:

> I would take this advice one step further, and suggest that there is
> probably a lot more complication to this application than is first apparent.
> I would recommend searching for a commercial application. This seems like a
> big enough industry there must be at least a few applications available.
> Investigate carefully to be SURE it is specified as meeting all of your
> needs (don't believe promises of "easy customization") and contact at least
> a few users to see if they agree with the marketing claims. Get a demo
> version of the software and test it VERY thoroughly before purchase.
>
> As a custom developer, I think it's very hard (or expensive) for a custom
> system to be better than a commercial application that's being used by many
> diverse users. The commercial system developers have had the benefits of
> refining application requirements both over a longer time and with more
> users. They hopefully had more money available to invest in program
> improvements, since they were being supported by a larger user base.
>
> If you're doing this more for your own enjoyment and the satisfaction of
> having built your own application, that's different. But if you're purpose
> is the most cost-effective way to get an application that does a good job
> running your business, I think you should at least start with the idea of
> exhausting the commercial market before you consider building your own. You
> said you were new to Access, which puts a pretty significant learning step
> in the path. If you're also new to database design and development in
> general, then it's a very large step. Nothing wrong with doing that
> learning, but you shouldn't think it's the same as building a simple
> spreadsheet.
>
> "Fred" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> > This looks like an easy application, but very specialized. My guess is
> > that
> > it would be more difficult and more work to adapt a different "template"
> > than
> > to build it from scratch.
> >
> > If you are up for investing sme time and effort in learning Access, you
> > might start by reading a few of those things that the other posters
> > recommended, plus post a more detailed description of waht you want to
> > database and ask for help / recommendations on a table stucture
> > foundation.
> >
> > If not, you might considere hiring a developer to make one for you, or to
> > search the livestock industry for software.

>
>

 
Reply With Quote
 
New Member
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 1
 
      30th Apr 2012
HI,
I've programmed one in Access with much VB for use with RFID systems, etc.. What are you trying to do? I have a vested interest in preserving the intellectual properties of my system, but maybe I can help. In the process of rebuilding it as a web ap bovinetracker.com
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
Reply

Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Anyone have a livestock inventory template? CitySlickerRancher Microsoft Excel Misc 1 30th Sep 2008 05:12 PM
Anyone have spreadsheets to keep information wrt: livestock? Dudley and the dogs Microsoft Excel Worksheet Functions 2 15th May 2008 03:53 AM
database for livestock =?Utf-8?B?UGhpbGwgQ29zdGVsbG8=?= Microsoft Access 2 24th Sep 2007 03:34 AM
Using Disk Management in XP for Partition Management =?Utf-8?B?UmljaA==?= Windows XP General 8 18th May 2006 08:16 AM
er ror: Close the Disk Management console, then restart Disk Management micheal Windows XP Hardware 1 7th Nov 2003 06:13 AM


Features
 

Advertising
 

Newsgroups
 


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 09:12 PM.